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Medicine

Science

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Ocean, Virus, Bacteria, Marine, gut microbiome, Microbial Communities, viral diversity, human gut, Ecosystem

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Jan-2018 1:00 PM EST

Science

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Research, Ecology, Oceans, Climate Change, Environment

Marine Vegetation Can Mitigate Ocean Acidification, UCI Study Finds

Marine plants and seaweeds in shallow coastal ecosystems can play a key role in alleviating the effects of ocean acidification, and their robust population in shoreline environments could help preserve declining shellfish life, according to a study by University of California, Irvine ecologists.

Medicine

Science

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Coral, Climate Change, Ocean, Acidification, Microbiome

How Climate Change Weakens Coral ‘Immune Systems’

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Researchers at The Ohio State University and their colleagues have demonstrated how rising temperatures and acidification combine to destabilize different populations of coral microbes—that is, unbalance the natural coral “microbiome."

Science

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Climate Change, Environment, Global Warming, Sea Turtles, Sea turtle conservation, Sea Turtle Hatchlings, Sea Turtle Eggs, Reptiles, Sex Ratios, Temperature-dependent Sex Determination, sex determination, Conservation, Embryogenesis, Phentotype

Double Trouble: Moisture, Not Just Heat Impacts Sex of Sea Turtle Hatchlings

Male sea turtles are disappearing and not just in Australia. FAU researchers found that 97 to 100 percent of hatchlings in southeast Florida have been female since 2002. They are the first to show why and how moisture conditions inside the nest in addition to heat affect the development and sex ratios of turtle embryos, using a novel technique they developed to estimate sex ratios with a male-specific, transcriptional molecular marker Sox9.

Science

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University of Washington, Oceanography, Fluid Dynamics, Ocean Science, Ocean Pollution, ocean physics

Temporary 'Bathtub Drains' in the Ocean Concentrate Flotsam

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An experiment using hundreds of plastic drifters in the Gulf of Mexico shows that rather than simply spread out, as current calculations would predict, many of them clumped together in a tight cluster.

Science

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collective computation, Animal Behavior, Complexity

How Living Systems Compute Solutions to Problems

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No individual fish or bee or neuron has enough information by itself to solve a complex problem, but together they can accomplish amazing things. In research recently published in Science Advances, Eleanor Brush (University of Maryland), David Krakauer, and Jessica Flack address how this is possible through a study of the emergence of social structure in primate social groups.

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Scale-Eating Fish Adopt Clever Parasitic Methods to Survive

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A small group of fishes — possibly the world’s cleverest carnivorous grazers — feeds on the scales of other fish in the tropics. A team led by biologists at the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Laboratories is trying to understand these scale-feeding fish and how this odd diet influences their body evolution and behavior.

Science

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Enviroment, climate disruption, global warming, reptile eggs, turtles, conservation, wildlife, endangered, , Barrier Reef

Green Sea Turtles Could Face Extinction as Temperatures Rise in Great Barrier Reef

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Science

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Arctic, Marine Life, artificial light, Zooplankton, Marine Science, Climate Change

Shedding Light on Life in the Arctic

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Scientists know that light triggers zooplankton and other marine organisms to move up and down in the water column during normal day and night cycles. Now, an international team of researchers has found that zooplankton are also susceptible to artificial light from research vessels.

Science

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Mahmood Shivji, Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography, Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, Guy Harvey Research Institute, Guy Harvey, Nova Southeastern University, Tiger Shark, shark conservation, shark tracking

Tagged Tiger Shark Proving Unstoppable

For more than a decade, researchers at NSU's Guy Harvey Research Institute have been tagging and tracking sharks in order to study their migratory patterns and more. One tiger shark - Andy - is now the longest-ever tracked tiger shark, providing years worth of data for researchers.







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