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Article ID: 705622

Salmon May Lose the Ability to Smell Danger as Carbon Emissions Rise

University of Washington

New research shows that the powerful sense of smell Pacific salmon rely on for migration, finding food and avoiding predators might be in trouble as carbon emissions continue to be absorbed by our ocean.

Released:
18-Dec-2018 12:05 PM EST

Article ID: 705608

Extraordinary 'faithful father' revealed by study of smooth guardian frog of Borneo

University of Kansas

LAWRENCE -- Stay-at-home dads might find their spirit animal in the smooth guardian frog of Borneo. A new pair of research papers authored by an investigator at the University of Kansas shows the male of the smooth guardian frog species (Limnonectes palavanensis) is a kind of amphibian "Mr. Mom" -- an exemplar of male parental care in the animal kingdom.

Released:
18-Dec-2018 11:35 AM EST
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Article ID: 705565

Conservation Success Depends on Habits and History

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The ghosts of harvesting can haunt today’s conservation efforts. Conserving or overharvesting a renewable resource like fish or other wildlife is often determined by habits and past decisions, according to a Rutgers-led study that challenges conventional expectations that the collapse of fast-growing natural resources is unlikely.

Released:
17-Dec-2018 3:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 705555

Warning over deep-sea 'gold rush'

University of Exeter

A "gold rush" of seabed mining could lead to unprecedented damage to fragile deep-sea ecosystems, researchers have warned.

Released:
17-Dec-2018 12:30 PM EST

Article ID: 705515

Texas State collaboration identified new sex chromosome formation in swordtail fish

Texas State University

Texas State University researchers have contributed to groundbreaking research that has identified the formation of a new sex chromosome in Xiphophorus fish.

Released:
17-Dec-2018 9:00 AM EST
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Article ID: 705495

Missing ocean monitoring instrument found after five years at sea

National Oceanography Centre

After going missing on Christmas Day five years ago, deep ocean measuring equipment belonging to the UK’s National Oceanography Centre (NOC) has just been found on a beach in Tasmania by a local resident after making an incredible 14,000 km journey across the ocean.

Released:
14-Dec-2018 12:25 PM EST
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Article ID: 705485

For These Critically Endangered Marine Turtles, Climate Change Could be a Knockout Blow

Florida State University

Researchers from FSU’s Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science suggest that projected increases in air temperatures, rainfall inundation and blistering solar radiation could significantly reduce hawksbill hatching success at a selection of major nesting beaches.

Released:
14-Dec-2018 11:05 AM EST

Article ID: 705467

New Research Finds Human Impact is Leading to Higher Salinity Levels in Freshwater Resources

California State University, Monterey Bay

New research finds that the combined effects of land use and climate change are resulting in increased salinity levels in rivers and streams, further highlighting an emerging threat to freshwater resources, biodiversity and ecosystem functions across the United States.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 9:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 705413

Coral larvae use sound to find a home on the reef

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Choosing a place to call home is one of the most consequential choices a coral can make. In the animal's larval stage, it floats freely in the ocean--but once it settles down, it anchors itself permanently to the rocky substrate of a reef, and remains stuck there for the rest of its life. Exactly how these larvae choose a specific place to live, however, is largely unclear.

Released:
13-Dec-2018 11:40 AM EST
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Article ID: 705381

Argentina Creates Two Massive Marine Parks

Wildlife Conservation Society

The Government of Argentina has created two massive offshore marine parks in the southwest Atlantic that will help protect the diverse marine life of the Patagonian Sea, according to WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and a host of other partners who have worked for years to protect these biodiverse seascapes.

Released:
12-Dec-2018 7:05 PM EST

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