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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Sep-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 719170

Actions to Save Coral Reefs Could Benefit All Ecosystems

James Cook University

Scientists say bolder actions to protect coral reefs from the effects of global warming will benefit all ecosystems, including those on land.

Released:
18-Sep-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Newswise: 211584_web.jpg

Article ID: 719195

North Atlantic haddock use magnetic compass to guide them

University of Miami, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science

A new study found that the larvae of haddock, a commercially important type of cod, have a magnetic compass to find their way at sea.

Released:
18-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT

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All Journal News, Marine Science

Languages:

English

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Article ID: 719164

Researchers explore fish movement to enhance underwater robots

Penn State College of Engineering

To understand the sensing, control and physics of fish-swimming with the goal of mimicking their performance in advanced robotics, researchers in the Penn State Department of Mechanical Engineering, in collaboration with the University of Houston and the University of Virginia, have recently been awarded a $1.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Released:
18-Sep-2019 9:00 AM EDT
Newswise: Elephant Seal 'Supermoms' Produce Most of the Population, Study Finds

Article ID: 719085

Elephant Seal 'Supermoms' Produce Most of the Population, Study Finds

University of California, Santa Cruz

Most of the pups born in an elephant seal colony in California over a span of five decades were produced by a relatively small number of long-lived "supermoms", according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz.

Released:
17-Sep-2019 11:15 AM EDT

Article ID: 719075

New study measures how much of corals’ nutrition comes from hunting

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

A new study is revealing that more of corals’ nutrients come from hunting than previously expected, information that may help predict the fate of coral reefs as global ocean temperatures rise.

Released:
17-Sep-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Newswise: 211205_web.jpg

Article ID: 719015

Four billion particles of microplastics discovered in major body of water

University of South Florida

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (September 12, 2019)- A new study from the University of South Florida St. Petersburg and Eckerd College estimates the waters of Tampa Bay contain four billion particles of microplastics, raising new questions about the impact of pollution on marine life in this vital ecosystem.

Released:
16-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Research Results

Channels:

All Journal News, Environmental Health, Marine Science, Pollution

Languages:

English

Newswise: 211396_web.jpg

Article ID: 719012

Hope for coral recovery may depend on good parenting

University of Southern California (USC)

The fate of the world's coral reefs could depend on how well the sea creatures equip their offspring to cope with global warming.

Released:
16-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Sep-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 718824

Antibiotic Resistance Surges in Dolphins, Mirroring Humans

Florida Atlantic University

Scientists obtained a total of 733 pathogen isolates from 171 individual wild Bottlenose dolphins in Florida and found that the overall prevalence of resistance to at least one antibiotic for the 733 isolates was 88.2 percent. Resistance was highest to erythromycin, followed by ampicillin. It is likely that these isolates from dolphins originated from a source where antibiotics are regularly used, potentially entering the marine environment through human activities or discharges from terrestrial sources.

Released:
11-Sep-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Newswise: California's Critical Refuge: Marine Protected Areas

Article ID: 718916

California's Critical Refuge: Marine Protected Areas

California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

California is home to 800 square miles of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) that provide refuge to some of the most iconic and diverse marine species. What began as an effort to conserve and protect the state’s marine ecosystems now has the potential to offer critical reference points for measuring the future impacts of climate change on marine ecosystems. Learn how California State University researchers are working to advance marine knowledge and preserve the state's ocean resources.

Released:
12-Sep-2019 1:05 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    11-Sep-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 718649

Long before other fish, ancient sharks found an alternative way to feed

University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers from the University of Chicago have used tools developed to explore 3D movements and mechanics of modern-day fish jaws to analyze a fossil fish for the first time.

Released:
9-Sep-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Research Results

Channels:

All Journal News, Marine Science, Paleontology

Languages:

English


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