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Released: 15-Jan-2021 2:50 PM EST
45% of adults over 65 lack online medical accounts that could help them sign up for COVID-19 vaccinations
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

As the vaccination of older adults against COVID-19 begins across the country, new poll data suggests that many of them don’t yet have access to the “patient portal” online systems that could make it much easier for them to schedule a vaccination appointment. In all, 45% of adults aged 65 to 80 had not set up an account with their health provider’s portal system.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 20-Jan-2021 4:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 15-Jan-2021 2:50 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Jan-2021 4:00 PM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Kenneth Altshuler, M.D., Who Led UT Southwestern Department of Psychiatry For 23 Years, Dies At 91
Released: 15-Jan-2021 2:00 PM EST
Kenneth Altshuler, M.D., Who Led UT Southwestern Department of Psychiatry For 23 Years, Dies At 91
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Jan. 15, 2021 – Kenneth Altshuler, M.D., a professor emeritus and longtime chair of psychiatry at UT Southwestern who helped to advance mental health causes in Dallas, died Jan. 6. He was 91.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 1:30 PM EST
New England Journal of Medicine publishes COVID-19 treatment trial results
University of Texas at San Antonio

A clinical trial involving COVID-19 patients hospitalized at UT Health San Antonio and University Health, among roughly 100 sites globally, found that a combination of the drugs baricitinib and remdesivir reduced time to recovery, according to results published Dec. 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Released: 15-Jan-2021 1:05 PM EST
Dairy product purchasing differs in households with and without children
Elsevier

American dairy consumers are often influenced by a variety of factors that can affect their buying habits. These factors include taste, preference, government information, cultural background, social media, and the news.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 12:40 PM EST
DNA test can quickly identify pneumonia in patients with severe COVID-19, aiding faster treatment
University of Cambridge

Researchers have developed a DNA test to quickly identify secondary infections in COVID-19 patients, who have double the risk of developing pneumonia while on ventilation than non-COVID-19 patients.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 12:20 PM EST
Target Discovered That Halts Osteoarthritis-Like Knee Cartilage Degeneration
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

In a mouse study, researchers used nanotechnology and previous knowledge of a protein pathway to significantly reduce knee cartilage degeneration and pain

Released: 15-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Commends Evidence-Based 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, Notes Opportunities for Future Updates
Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics commends the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for developing the 2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 11:30 AM EST
UW researchers develop tool to equitably distribute limited vaccines
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and UW Health have developed a tool that incorporates a person’s age and socioeconomic status to prioritize vaccine distribution among people who otherwise share similar risks due to their jobs.

Newswise: New delivery method cuts required dose, promises relief from adverse side effects of antipsychotic medication
Released: 15-Jan-2021 10:35 AM EST
New delivery method cuts required dose, promises relief from adverse side effects of antipsychotic medication
McMaster University

A team of neuroscientists and engineers at McMaster University has created a nasal spray to deliver antipsychotic medication directly to the brain instead of having it pass through the body.

13-Jan-2021 11:15 AM EST
Mount Sinai Finds That Transgender Women Can Safely Stay On Their Hormone Treatments During Gender Affirming Surgery, Without An Increase of Blood Clots
Mount Sinai Health System

This is the first study to demonstrate that there is no difference in blood clots when transgender women remain on estrogen hormone therapy for gender affirming surgery. Because both estrogen therapy and surgery can increase a person’s risk of blood clots, experts had long suggested that transgender women stop taking estrogen when undergoing gender affirming surgery. However, there was previously no published data on the blood clot risk specific to transgender women undergoing surgery.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 9:45 AM EST
CHOP Researchers Find NTRK Fusions More Common than Expected in Pediatric Tumors
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

In a large study of pediatric cancer patients, researchers from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have analyzed the frequency, fusion partners, and clinical outcome of neurotrophic tyrosine receptor kinase (NTRK) fusions, which are clinical biomarkers that identify patients suitable for treatment with FDA-approved TRK inhibitors. The researchers found that NTRK fusions are more common in pediatric tumors and also involve a wider range of tumors than adult cancers, information that could help prioritize screening for NTRK fusions in pediatric cancer patients who might benefit from treatment with TRK inhibitors.

14-Jan-2021 5:00 PM EST
AACI Partners With Federal Vaccine Panel to Promote Cancer Patient Health
Association of American Cancer Institutes (AACI)

AACI was invited last summer to join the Vaccine Consultation Panel (VCP) alongside other leading health and science organizations in the U.S. Through the VCP, AACI has received periodic updates on the development and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines and participated in efforts to educate the cancer center community and the general public on the importance of widespread vaccine uptake.

Newswise: Researchers Help Pioneer New Era in Prostate Cancer Active Surveillance
Released: 15-Jan-2021 8:55 AM EST
Researchers Help Pioneer New Era in Prostate Cancer Active Surveillance
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers are looking at ways to combine imaging and biomarkers to predict prostate cancer progression more accurately.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 8:55 AM EST
The First Dose of the Pfizer Vaccine Gives About 50% COVID Protection, Not 91% Claimed by Those Who Want to Speed Up Immunization
Newswise

The NEJM paper actually states that the efficacy between the first and second doses was found to be 52 percent when given 21 days apart. After the second dose, the efficacy raises to 95 percent.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 8:20 AM EST
Houston Methodist study finds males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females
Houston Methodist

A new Houston Methodist study found males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, have complications and die from the virus than females, independent of age. The peer-reviewed observational study appears in PLOS ONE, a multidisciplinary journal published by the Public Library of Science.

Released: 15-Jan-2021 8:20 AM EST
NIH Revises Treatment Guidelines for Ivermectin for the Treatment of COVID-19
Front Line COVID-19 Critical Care Alliance (FLCCC Alliance)

NIH Revises Treatment Guidelines for Ivermectin for the Treatment of COVID-19 Ivermectin is Now a Therapeutic Option for Doctors & Prescribers

Newswise: Glaucoma Research Foundation to Honor Leaders in Glaucoma Innovation at their 2021 Virtual Gala
Released: 15-Jan-2021 8:10 AM EST
Glaucoma Research Foundation to Honor Leaders in Glaucoma Innovation at their 2021 Virtual Gala
Glaucoma Research Foundation

The Catalyst Award will be presented to Ramin Valian of Allergan, an AbbVie Company, in recognition of Allergan's ongoing leadership and commitment to the development of innovative treatments to advance glaucoma care.

14-Jan-2021 8:00 AM EST
An Unexpected, and Novel, Target for Prostate Cancer – Our Biological Clock
Thomas Jefferson University

Researchers find that CRY-1, a regulator of circadian rhythms, promotes tumor progression by altering DNA repair.

Newswise: Studying and Treating COVID-19’s Long-Term Impact
Released: 14-Jan-2021 6:05 PM EST
Studying and Treating COVID-19’s Long-Term Impact
Rush University Medical Center

The CDC is funding a Rush-led effort in which 8 academic medical centers will track the clinical, physical and mental functioning -- including neuro-cognition and fatigue – of nearly 5000 COVID patients for two years to better assess the long-term outcomes of the disease.

Newswise: Mercy Medical Center’s HIPEC Program Exceeds Standards, Positions Mercy as National Leader in Field
Released: 14-Jan-2021 5:20 PM EST
Mercy Medical Center’s HIPEC Program Exceeds Standards, Positions Mercy as National Leader in Field
Mercy Medical Center

Drs. Armando Sardi, Vadim Gushchin, and Kurtis Campbell, Surgical Oncology Department at Mercy Medical Center, are regarded for their training and skills in utilizing HIPEC to treat advanced stages of abdominal cancer (peritoneal surface malignancies). New findings by a prestigious organization of clinicians adds to this reputation, placing Mercy’s program among the nation’s best.

Newswise: Potential COVID-19 Drug Is Successful in Lab Study
Released: 14-Jan-2021 5:20 PM EST
Potential COVID-19 Drug Is Successful in Lab Study
Rush University Medical Center

A new potential therapy for COVID-19 developed by researchers at Rush University Medical Center has shown success in preventing the disease’s symptoms in mice.

Newswise: Acute itching in eczema patients linked to environmental allergens
Released: 14-Jan-2021 4:50 PM EST
Acute itching in eczema patients linked to environmental allergens
Washington University in St. Louis

New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that allergens in the environment often are to blame for episodes of acute itch in eczema patients, and that the itching often doesn’t respond to antihistamines because the itch signals are being carried to the brain along a previously unrecognized pathway that current drugs don’t target.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 4:50 PM EST
UNH Researchers Discover New Inhibitor Drug Combination for Rare Form of Cancer
University of New Hampshire

Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), a rare form of lymphoma, does not have any known cure and only one FDA-approved treatment making it challenging to treat patients. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire took the novel approach of targeting specific cell proteins that control DNA information using inhibitors, or drugs, that were effective in reducing the growth of the cancer cells and when combined with a third drug were even more successful in killing the WM cancer cells which could lead to more treatment options.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 2:20 PM EST
Exposure to violence takes a toll on the socioemotional well-being of Californians
UC Davis Health

A survey of Californians finds that exposure to violence has pervasive social and emotional impacts on people, especially when firearms are involved.

Newswise: Loyola Medicine Offers Men's Health Tips for the New Year
Released: 14-Jan-2021 1:55 PM EST
Loyola Medicine Offers Men's Health Tips for the New Year
Loyola Medicine

A new year brings a new opportunity to focus on health, and Loyola Medicine Men's Health Center Director Kevin McVary, MD is offering tips for a healthier 2021.

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Embargo will expire: 19-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 14-Jan-2021 1:35 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 19-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

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Released: 14-Jan-2021 12:35 PM EST
Rare quadruple-helix DNA found in living human cells with glowing probes
Imperial College London

New probes allow scientists to see four-stranded DNA interacting with molecules inside living human cells, unravelling its role in cellular processes.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 12:25 PM EST
MIND and Mediterranean diets associated with later onset of Parkinson's disease
University of British Columbia

A new study from UBC researchers suggests a strong correlation between following the MIND and Mediterranean diets and later onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). While researchers have long known of neuroprotective effects of the MIND diet for diseases like Alzheimer's and dementia, this study is the first to suggest a link between this diet and brain health for Parkinson's disease (PD).

Newswise: Reverse engineering 3D chromosome models for individual cells
Released: 14-Jan-2021 12:10 PM EST
Reverse engineering 3D chromosome models for individual cells
University of Illinois at Chicago

A new computational technique that uses heat map data to reverse engineer highly detailed models of chromosomes. Through this work, researchers have uncovered new information about the close spatial relationships that chromatin folding creates between genes that can be highly distant from one another along DNA strands.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
Population density and virus strains will affect how regions can resume normal life
University of Wisconsin-Madison

As a new, apparently more transmissible version of the virus that causes COVID-19 has appeared in several countries, new research finds that the transmissibility of viral strains and the population density of a region will play big roles in how vaccination campaigns can help towns and cities return to more normal activities. The findings suggest that directing vaccines toward densely populated counties would help to interrupt transmission of the disease.

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Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:55 AM EST
Scientists are a step closer to developing 'smart' stem cells - made from human fat
University of New South Wales

A new type of stem cell - that is, a cell with regenerative abilities - could be closer on the horizon, a new study led by UNSW Sydney shows.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:45 AM EST
Fast food restaurant proximity likely doesn't affect children's weight
Oxford University Press

A new paper in Q Open finds that the availability of fast food restaurants on the route between children's houses and their schools does not affect children's weight.

Newswise: Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation Announces Sponsorship by United Therapeutics
Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:45 AM EST
Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation Announces Sponsorship by United Therapeutics
Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) has announced United Therapeutics' sponsorship of the PFF Registry, a research resource that tracks clinical data, blood samples and patient-reported outcomes from individuals living with pulmonary fibrosis nationwide.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:35 AM EST
Discrimination may increase risk of anxiety disorders regardless of genetics, study finds
Tufts University

Exposure to discrimination plays a significant role in the risk of developing anxiety and related disorders, even – in a first – after accounting for potential genetic risks, according to a multidisciplinary team of health researchers led by Tufts University and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:25 AM EST
Cancer Models Created by Mechanical Engineers Offer New Insight Into Tumor Growth
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

In research published today in Integrative Biology, a team of engineers from Rensselaer developed an in vitro — in the lab — lymphatic vessel model to study the growth of tumor emboli, collections of tumor cells within vessels that are often associated with increased metastasis and tumor recurrence.

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Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:15 AM EST
How the brain paralyzes you while you sleep
University of Tsukuba

We laugh when we see Homer Simpson falling asleep while driving, while in church, and while even operating the nuclear reactor.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 11:10 AM EST
Neither ‘meniscal’ nor ‘mechanical’ symptoms predict findings on knee arthroscopy
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Orthopaedic surgeons have traditionally been taught that certain types of knee symptoms indicate damage to specialized structures called the menisci. But these “meniscal” and “mechanical” symptoms do not reflect what surgeons will find at knee arthroscopy, reports a study in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

13-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
Study shows sharp decline in cancer screenings and diagnoses during the first COVID-19 surge
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

In one of the first studies to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer diagnoses, researchers at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center document a substantial decline in cancer and precancer diagnoses at the Northeast’s largest health care system during the first peak of the pandemic because of a drop in the number of cancer screening tests performed.

12-Jan-2021 3:05 PM EST
Cardiac Rehabilitation is Underused Across the Country. One Simple Change Could Fix That.
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Making doctors opt out from prescribing cardiac rehabilitation instead of opting in increased referrals by roughly 70 percent

12-Jan-2021 11:00 AM EST
Scientists Take Important Step Toward Using Retinal Cell Transplants to Treat Blindness
Mount Sinai Health System

Retinal cells derived from a cadaver human eye survived when transplanted into the eyes of primate models, an important advance in the development of cell therapy to treat blindness, according to a study published on January 14 in Stem Cell Reports.

Newswise: Behaviors Surrounding Oral Sex May Increase HPV-Related Cancer Risk
Released: 14-Jan-2021 10:10 AM EST
Behaviors Surrounding Oral Sex May Increase HPV-Related Cancer Risk
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A wide breadth of behaviors surrounding oral sex may affect the risk of oral HPV infection and of a virus-associated head and neck cancer that can be spread through this route, a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center suggests. These findings add nuance to the connection between oral sex and oropharyngeal cancer — tumors that occur in the mouth and throat — and could help inform research and public health efforts aimed at preventing this disease.

12-Jan-2021 1:55 PM EST
Restricting Malt Liquor Sales is Linked to Reductions in Neighborhood Crime
Research Society on Alcoholism

Restricting the sale of malt liquor beer can help reduce crime in some communities, according to a new study. Malt liquor beer — high in alcohol content, low cost, and widely sold in liquor stores and convenience stores — is linked to heavy drinking, public inebriation, disorderly conduct, drug activity and other crimes. Consequently, since the 1990s, some cities have restricted its sale. In Washington state, certain urban neighborhoods were designated Alcohol Impact Areas and targeted with policies including restrictions on sales of malt liquor and similar products. Unpublished evaluations of these interventions have suggested positive social and health effects, but the research on crime impacts has been limited, with mixed findings. The study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research found that malt liquor sales restrictions are associated with declining urban crime.

12-Jan-2021 1:45 PM EST
People Feeling Angry Are Willing to Purchase Alcohol at Higher Prices But May Not Know It
Research Society on Alcoholism

People who’ve been provoked to anger are willing to purchase alcohol at higher prices, but may not be aware of their increased urge to drink, according to a new study. Anger, hostility, and aggression are known to relate to drinking, with anger a risk factor for heavy alcohol use. Building on previous studies that have deliberately manipulated emotional states to explore their effects on substance use, researchers at Wayne State University, Michigan, designed an experiment that could help clarify whether anger can motivate people to drink . For the study in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, the investigators sought to induce anger in participants and measure the effect of that anger on the desire to drink. They used two measures of drinking urges: self-reported alcohol craving and a behavioral task that assesses people’s motivation to drink.

Newswise: Researchers Link Cellular Transport Pathway to Aggressive Brain Cancer
7-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
Researchers Link Cellular Transport Pathway to Aggressive Brain Cancer
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at McGill University have identified a new cellular pathway that limits the growth and spread of brain tumors by controlling the recycling of cell surface receptor proteins. The study, which will be published January 14 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that the pathway, which involves a protein called Rab35, is defective in many patients with glioblastoma and that restoring Rab35’s activity could be a new therapeutic strategy for this deadly form of brain cancer.

Released: 14-Jan-2021 9:55 AM EST
Males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females, study finds
PLOS

Males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, more likely to have complications and more likely to die from the virus than females, independent of age, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Farhaan Vahidy of Houston Methodist Research Institute, US, and colleagues.

Newswise: A Rift in the Retina May Help Repair the Optic Nerve
Released: 14-Jan-2021 9:00 AM EST
A Rift in the Retina May Help Repair the Optic Nerve
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In experiments in mouse tissues and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found that removing a membrane that lines the back of the eye may improve the success rate for regrowing nerve cells damaged by blinding diseases. The findings are specifically aimed at discovering new ways to reverse vision loss caused by glaucoma and other diseases that affect the optic nerve, the information highway from the eye to the brain.


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