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Newswise: Successful ‘alien’ bird invasions are location dependent
  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 714610

Successful ‘alien’ bird invasions are location dependent

University of Utah

A new study published today in Nature, shows that alien bird introductions are most successful in locations and climates similar to their native habitats and in places where other alien species are already established. The discovery is important for understanding the processes that help or hinder species moving between locations, and the next steps for predicting and limiting the threat of future biological invasions.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Newswise: Bird of Prey: Evocative Film Reveals World’s Rarest Eagle and a New Chapter of Hope

Article ID: 714351

Bird of Prey: Evocative Film Reveals World’s Rarest Eagle and a New Chapter of Hope

Cornell University

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s debut film, the award-winning documentary Bird of Prey, is now available on iTunes, Amazon, and Vimeo. With fewer than 800 Great Philippine Eagles remaining on Earth, the film tells the moving tale of a small but devoted group of people who are determined to save these magnificent birds from extinction.

Released:
13-Jun-2019 1:05 PM EDT

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Newswise: Analysis: World’s Protected Areas Safeguard Only a Fraction of Wildlife

Article ID: 713963

Analysis: World’s Protected Areas Safeguard Only a Fraction of Wildlife

Wildlife Conservation Society

A new analysis published in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment shows that the world’s protected areas (PAs) are experiencing major shortfalls in staffing and resources and are therefore failing on a massive scale to safeguard wildlife.

Released:
5-Jun-2019 10:05 AM EDT

Channels:

All Journal News, Birds, Nature, Wildlife

Languages:

English

Article ID: 713915

New research explores the mechanics of how birds flock

University of New Orleans

Wildlife researchers have long tried to understand why birds fly in flocks and how different types of flocks work.

Released:
4-Jun-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Channels:

All Journal News, Birds, Wildlife

Languages:

English

Newswise: Organic animal farms benefit birds nesting in agricultural environments

Article ID: 713034

Organic animal farms benefit birds nesting in agricultural environments

University of Helsinki

The abundance of bird species living in agricultural environments has decreased both in Finland and elsewhere in Europe.

Released:
16-May-2019 2:05 PM EDT
ASA_Master_Brand_CMYK.JPG
  • Embargo expired:
    15-May-2019 1:30 PM EDT

Article ID: 712715

Can Sound Protect Eagles from Wind Turbine Collisions?

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Every year, bald and golden eagles are killed when they inadvertently fly into wind turbine blades. One possible way to prevent these deaths is to chase the birds away with acoustic signals. To determine what types of sounds are most effective in deterring the birds, researchers tested the behavioral responses of bald eagles to a battery of both natural and synthetic acoustic stimuli. Auditory neuroscientist JoAnn McGee will present the results of those tests at the 177th ASA Meeting, May 13-17.

Released:
10-May-2019 1:05 PM EDT
ASA_Master_Brand_CMYK.JPG
  • Embargo expired:
    15-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 712704

New Whistle Alerts Bats to Steer Clear of Wind Turbines

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Wind turbines are a critical component in the strategy for energy independence, but these massive structures are also killing bats. Now, researchers from Texas A&M University are exploring a unique passive acoustic whistle mounted on turbine blades to warn bats of the deadly turbines using a sound they can easily hear and recognize. They will present the team’s research findings at the 177th ASA Meeting.

Released:
10-May-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Newswise: How Sea Level Rise Affects Birds in Coastal Forests
  • Embargo expired:
    9-May-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 712502

How Sea Level Rise Affects Birds in Coastal Forests

North Carolina State University

Saltwater intrusion changes coastal vegetation that provides bird habitat. Researchers found that the transition from forests to marshes along the North Carolina coast due to climate change could benefit some bird species of concern for conservation.

Released:
7-May-2019 1:30 PM EDT
Newswise: Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet

Article ID: 712281

Bats evolved diverse skull shapes due to echolocation, diet

University of Washington

In a paper published May 2 in Nature Communications, a University of Washington team reports that two major forces have shaped bat skulls over their evolutionary history -- echolocation and diet -- generating a huge diversity of skull shapes across more than 1,300 bat species today.

Released:
2-May-2019 1:00 PM EDT
Newswise: What Drives Multiple Female Acorn Woodpeckers to Share a Nest?

Article ID: 712260

What Drives Multiple Female Acorn Woodpeckers to Share a Nest?

Cornell University

Acorn Woodpeckers live in close-knit family groups and have one of the most complex breeding systems of any bird in the world. In about 20 percent of family groups, up to 3 related females may lay eggs in the same nest. They raise the chicks cooperatively with one or more related males. This behavior is known as joint nesting or “cooperative polyandry.” Only five other species of birds worldwide are known to do this. The reasons that may be driving the behavior are outlined in a study recently published in The American Naturalist.

Released:
2-May-2019 9:00 AM EDT

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