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Article ID: 709762

Bromethalin is poisoning the parrots of Telegraph Hill

University of Georgia

Bromethalin, a common rat poison, is the agent responsible for a neurological disease that has sickened or killed birds from a popular flock of naturalized parrots that reside primarily in the Telegraph Hill area in north San Francisco, according to a new study led by the University of Georgia Infectious Diseases Laboratory and funded by Mickaboo Companion Bird Rescue.

Released:
18-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709619

Why Fly the Coop? With Shortage of Mates, Some Birds Choose to Help Others Raise Offspring

Florida State University

After a five-year experiment, researchers from Florida State University and the Tallahassee-based Tall Timbers Research Station found that when fewer mates were available for brown-headed nuthatches, these small pine-forest birds opted to stay home and help their parents or other adults raise their offspring.

Released:
14-Mar-2019 9:40 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    13-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 709274

Protected areas could help large herbivores bounce back after war

PLOS

Large herbivore populations can substantially recover after war-induced declines, given that protected area management is provided, according to a study published March 13 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marc Stalmans of Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique, and colleagues. But the community structure may take longer to restore, as the rate of recovery varies for different populations.

Released:
7-Mar-2019 11:20 AM EST
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Article ID: 709055

Study: Climate Change is Leading to Unpredictable Ecosystem Disruption for Migratory Birds

Cornell University

Using data on 77 North American migratory bird species from the eBird citizen-science program, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology say that, in as little as four decades, it may be very difficult to predict how climate change will affect migratory bird populations and the ecosystems they inhabit. Their conclusions are presented in a paper published in the journal Ecography.  

Released:
5-Mar-2019 3:10 AM EST
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Article ID: 708633

Spring migration is now earlier in European and North American birds

University of Helsinki

The greatest advances were found among short-distance migrants that winter in Europe or North America: about 1.5-2 days per decade. Long-distance migrants that winter in the tropics have also advanced the start of their migration

Released:
25-Feb-2019 12:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    21-Feb-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 708014

How bird feather patterns form

PLOS

Feathers evolved in dinosaurs and are a key characteristic of birds today. They are arranged in a precise hexagonal pattern in a bird’s skin, but it has been unclear how this happens.

Released:
13-Feb-2019 8:30 AM EST
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Article ID: 708428

Origins of giant extinct New Zealand bird traced to Africa

University of Adelaide

Scientists have revealed the African origins of New Zealand’s most mysterious giant flightless bird – the now extinct adzebill – showing that some of its closest living relatives are the pint-sized flufftails from Madagascar and Africa.

Released:
20-Feb-2019 7:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 708429

New study: How to save a seabird

University of Washington

A new study outlines more than a decade of success in reducing seabird bycatch in Alaska’s longline fisheries, and where there’s still room for improvement.

Released:
20-Feb-2019 7:05 PM EST
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Article ID: 708337

Protecting Small Forests Fails to Protect Bird Biodiversity

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Simply protecting small forests will not maintain the diversity of the birds they support over the long run, a Rutgers-led study says. Forests need to be carefully monitored and managed to maintain their ecological integrity.

Released:
20-Feb-2019 8:20 AM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    13-Feb-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 707738

White-tailed deer shape acoustic properties of their forest habitat

PLOS

White-tailed deer feeding habits shape the acoustic properties of their forest habitat, potentially affecting the vocal communication of understory-dwelling songbirds and other species, according to a study published February 13, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Timothy J. Boycott from Vassar College, USA, and colleagues.

Released:
7-Feb-2019 1:25 PM EST

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