Feature Channels: Nature

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Released: 10-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
The survivability of animal species depends on the number of offspring
Tel Aviv University

Researchers from Tel Aviv University took part in a new international study proposing an amendment to the widely accepted theory on the extinction of animal species - by moving the focus from the animal's body size to its reproductive capacity.

Newswise: Acoustical Evolution Increases Battle Between Predator, Prey
4-Jun-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Acoustical Evolution Increases Battle Between Predator, Prey
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

In the battle between hunter and hunted, sound plays an integral part in success or failure. In the case of bats vs. moths, the insects are using acoustics against their winged foes. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Thomas Neil from the University of Bristol will discuss how moth wings have evolved in composition and structure to help them create anti-bat defenses. The session, "Moth wings are acoustic metamaterials," will take place Wednesday, June 9.

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Released: 8-Jun-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Tree diversity may save the forest: Advocating for biodiversity to mitigate climate change
Yokohama National University

When it comes to climate change, policymakers may fail to see the trees for the forest. Turns out that the trees may be the answer after all, according to a study published by authors from more than seven countries on June 3rd in Nature Climate Change.

Newswise: First Global Statistical Analysis of Harmful Algal Blooms
Released: 8-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
First Global Statistical Analysis of Harmful Algal Blooms
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

June 8, 2021 -- The first-ever global statistical analysis of trends in harmful algal blooms (HABs) has shown that, worldwide, there is no significant increase in HABs events, but that in some regions, events that include toxic species of algae affecting humans and wildlife are on the rise. In addition, the study finds that human activity, primarily aquaculture in coastal waters, and the economic impacts that HABs event cause to the fast-growing growing industry, is likely behind the perceived increase.

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Released: 7-Jun-2021 4:20 PM EDT
Sea Turtle Week: FSU Marine Biologist Available to Comment on Importance of these Keystone Species
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: June 7, 2021 | 2:14 pm | SHARE: Sea turtles have existed on Earth for more than 100 million years.But today, most species of these oceangoing reptiles are threatened or endangered. Scientists and resource managers are working to better understand and manage their populations, and they’re using work like that led by Mariana Fuentes, an associate professor in the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Science at Florida State University.

Released: 4-Jun-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Gift to establish K. Lisa Yang Center for Conservation Bioacoustics
Cornell University

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s Center for Conservation Bioacoustics will begin a new era of innovation thanks to a major gift from the philanthropist and Lab Advisory Board member K. Lisa Yang.

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Released: 3-Jun-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Solar energy and pollinator conservation: A path for real impact?
Entomological Society of America (ESA)

Amid the steady growth of solar energy production in the United States, pollinator conservation at solar installations has become an appealing secondary pursuit, but the long-term success of such efforts remains to be seen.

Newswise: MEDIA ADVISORY: Story, Feature Ideas from 180th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Released: 3-Jun-2021 1:40 PM EDT
MEDIA ADVISORY: Story, Feature Ideas from 180th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

The 180th ASA Meeting, being held virtually June 8-10, will feature sessions on how the COVID-19 pandemic impacted hearing health, affected noise annoyance in urban settings, and adjusted how teachers talked and listened to their students. There will be presentations on how acoustics shapes speech in children, impacts mental health, and potentially signals health problems.

Newswise: UW researchers investigate mining-related deforestation in the Amazon
Released: 3-Jun-2021 11:55 AM EDT
UW researchers investigate mining-related deforestation in the Amazon
University of Wisconsin-Madison

If you’re wearing gold jewelry right now, there’s a good chance it came from an illegal mining operation in the tropics and surfaced only after some rainforest was sacrificed, according to a team of University of Wisconsin researchers who studied regulatory efforts to curb some of these environmentally damaging activities.

Newswise: World’s Lakes Losing Oxygen Rapidly as Planet Warms
Released: 2-Jun-2021 11:15 AM EDT
World’s Lakes Losing Oxygen Rapidly as Planet Warms
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Oxygen levels in the world’s temperate freshwater lakes are declining rapidly — faster than in the oceans — a trend driven largely by climate change that threatens freshwater biodiversity and drinking water quality.

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Released: 28-May-2021 1:35 PM EDT
COVID-19 kept our parks busy, but not everyone ventured outside
University of Queensland

Public use of parks and reserves increased only slightly during last year's COVID-19 national lockdown despite gyms and sports facilities shutting down, a University of Queensland study found.

Newswise: The Role of Warming Climate on Forest Reproduction
Released: 26-May-2021 12:35 PM EDT
The Role of Warming Climate on Forest Reproduction
Humboldt State University

Building on 16 years of research, Forestry Professor David Greene has found evidence that mast seeding—the boom-or-bust crop cycle typical of most tree species—is governed by a simple weather cue that operates asynchronously across the continent.

Newswise: Pollinating insects can help soybean yields
Released: 25-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Pollinating insects can help soybean yields
Iowa State University

Insects can help soybean yields by carrying out more effective pollination, according to a recently published study conducted by an international team of scientists. The study suggests introducing pollinator habitat to soybean fields may lead to production benefits, in addition to environmental advantages.

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Released: 20-May-2021 2:40 PM EDT
High risk of conflict between humans and elephants and lions
University of Helsinki

Elephants and lions are iconic species that help raise substantial funds for conservation. However, they also pose significant threats to people, crops, and livestock, and are themselves threatened with extinction.

Newswise: Earth’s Vegetation Is Changing Faster Today Than It Has Over the Last 18,000 Years
18-May-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Earth’s Vegetation Is Changing Faster Today Than It Has Over the Last 18,000 Years
University of Wisconsin-Madison

A global survey of fossil pollen has discovered that the planet’s vegetation is changing at least as quickly today as it did when the last ice sheets retreated around 10,000 years ago.

Released: 19-May-2021 4:35 PM EDT
Insect and animal invasions can teach us about COVID-19
University of Leeds

Invasions by alien insect and animal species have much in common with outbreaks of infectious diseases and could tell us a great deal about how pandemics spread, according to a research paper published today.

Released: 19-May-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Bees interrupted
Michigan State University

During a 15-year study of wild bees visiting blueberry fields during their blooming season, researchers caught an unexpected glimpse of how extreme weather events can impact bee populations highlighting the need for more long-term studies, says a Michigan State University researcher.

Released: 14-May-2021 4:55 PM EDT
Environmental chemist's work demonstrated conclusively that CFCs were responsible for the massive destruction of stratospheric ozone
Newswise

Environmental chemist's work demonstrated conclusively that CFCs were responsible for the massive destruction of stratospheric ozone

Newswise: NSU Researcher Part of Team to Sequence the Genome of One of the World’s Most Elusive Big Cats – the Leopard
Released: 14-May-2021 10:15 AM EDT
NSU Researcher Part of Team to Sequence the Genome of One of the World’s Most Elusive Big Cats – the Leopard
Nova Southeastern University

They are some of the most beautiful, and elusive, animals on the plant. Leopards. In a major scientific step, the whole genome DNA sequence of 23 individual leopards have been interpreted.

Newswise: How Moths Find Their Flame - Genetics of Mate Attraction Discovered
Released: 14-May-2021 5:00 AM EDT
How Moths Find Their Flame - Genetics of Mate Attraction Discovered
Tufts University

Biologists have revealed for the first time the genetics linking pheromone signals produced by female moths and the neuronal response driving male attraction to females. The ability to predict mate choice will help in understanding how species diverge, and how to control agricultural pests.

Released: 12-May-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Iconic bird makes its home on campus
University of California, Irvine

With its tree-laden campus and adjacent protected natural reserves, UCI enjoys being home to a great variety of bird species. One particular raptor continues to capture the attention of the many avid birders in Orange County: the white-tailed kite. This iconic bird of Orange County – named for its ability to hover in the air while hunting –nearly went extinct throughout California in the early 1900s due to human-related threats.

Released: 12-May-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Only 17 percent of free-flowing rivers are protected, new research shows
Northern Arizona University

New research published in special issue of Sustainability co-edited by NAU researcher finds that biodiversity commitments will be key to freshwater protection

Newswise: A Crisis of Comfort
Released: 11-May-2021 11:30 AM EDT
A Crisis of Comfort
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

In "The Comfort Crisis," UNLV journalism professor Michael Easter investigates how our modern-day comforts are linked to some of our most pressing problems—obesity, chronic disease, depression—and how by leaving our comfort zone, we can improve our overall mental, physical, and spiritual wellbeing.

Newswise: 264436_web.jpg
Released: 10-May-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Rapid lifestyle changes during early COVID-19 pandemic had no impact on climate change
University of Tokyo

Despite the rapid and significant changes in consumption patterns witnessed during the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic, Japanese households maintained their normal levels of greenhouse gases emissions.

Newswise: 264466_web.jpg
Released: 10-May-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Conservationists concerned about illegal hunting and exploitation of porcupines in Indonesia
Pensoft Publishers

Porcupines are frequently traded across Asia, and Indonesia, home to five species, is no exception.

Released: 5-May-2021 5:00 PM EDT
UNH Research: More Than One Way for Animals to Survive Climate Change
University of New Hampshire

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire found that to live in hotter more desert-like surroundings, and exist without water, there is more than one genetic mechanism allowing animals to adapt. This is important not only for their survival but may also provide important biomedical groundwork to develop gene therapies to treat human dehydration related illnesses, like kidney disease.

Newswise: Bees thrive where it's hot and dry: A unique biodiversity hotspot located in North America
Released: 5-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Bees thrive where it's hot and dry: A unique biodiversity hotspot located in North America
Pensoft Publishers

The United States-Mexico border traverses through large expanses of unspoiled land in North America, including a newly discovered worldwide hotspot of bee diversity.

Newswise: Meet the freaky fanged frog from the Philippines
Released: 5-May-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Meet the freaky fanged frog from the Philippines
University of Kansas

Researchers at the University of Kansas have described a new species of fanged frog discovered in the Philippines that's nearly indistinguishable from a species on a neighboring island except for its unique mating call and key differences in its genome.

Newswise: How a Yale scientist and REM star named an ant for a Warhol 'Superstar'
Released: 5-May-2021 12:45 PM EDT
How a Yale scientist and REM star named an ant for a Warhol 'Superstar'
Yale University

The ant came in a small vial of ethanol, sealed in a plastic bag, and packed in a small cardboard box. It was addressed to Yale's Douglas B. Booher.

Newswise: Tiny plastic particles in the environment
Released: 4-May-2021 9:25 AM EDT
Tiny plastic particles in the environment
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

The images leave no one cold: giant vortices of floating plastic trash in the world's oceans with sometimes devastating consequences for their inhabitants – the sobering legacy of our modern lifestyle. Weathering and degradation processes produce countless tiny particles that can now be detected in virtually all ecosystems. But how dangerous are the smallest of them, so-called nanoplastics? Are they a ticking time bomb, as alarming media reports suggest? In the latest issue of the journal Nature Nanotechnology, a team from Empa and ETH Zurich examines the state of current knowledge – or lack thereof – and points out how these important questions should be addressed.

Newswise: NSF awards UAH’s Dr. Niemiller $1.029 million 
for groundwater biodiversity study
Released: 3-May-2021 10:40 AM EDT
NSF awards UAH’s Dr. Niemiller $1.029 million for groundwater biodiversity study
University of Alabama Huntsville

A proposal to conduct the first comprehensive assessment of groundwater biodiversity in the central and eastern United States has earned a University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) assistant professor of biological science a five-year, $1.029 million National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award.

Newswise: New View of Species Interactions Offers Clues to Preserve Threatened Ecosystems
Released: 30-Apr-2021 1:25 PM EDT
New View of Species Interactions Offers Clues to Preserve Threatened Ecosystems
University of California San Diego

Scientists from around the world have produced a new analysis—believed to be the most detailed study of specialized ecological data from global forests—that is furthering science’s understanding of species interactions and how diversity contributes to the preservation of ecosystem health.

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Released: 29-Apr-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Using science to serve nature
University of California, Irvine

Amid the extreme aridity of the vast Colorado Desert of eastern San Diego County, a ribbon of greenery allows life to thrive. The Sentenac Cienega area inside Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is more than 100 miles southeast of Irvine. It contains a desert wetland, which is part of the San Felipe Creek watershed that is fed by nearby mountains and ultimately flows into the Salton Sea.

Newswise: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to Launch New Center for Ocean and Climate Research
with Gift from Francis E Fowler IV
Released: 28-Apr-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to Launch New Center for Ocean and Climate Research with Gift from Francis E Fowler IV
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Woods Hole, Mass. (April 28, 2021) --Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) today announced the establishment of the Francis E. Fowler IV Center for Ocean and Climate to seek new knowledge and new solutions at the intersection of oceanography and climate science. A generous gift from Francis E. Fowler IV established the center and will enable it to immediately commence operations.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Climate crises in Mesopotamia prompted the first stable forms of State
Universita di Bologna

During the Bronze Age, Mesopotamia was witness to several climate crises. In the long run, these crises prompted the development of stable forms of State and therefore elicited cooperation between political elites and non-elites.

Newswise: Keeping Social Distance (From Wildlife)
Released: 21-Apr-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Keeping Social Distance (From Wildlife)
Wildlife Conservation Society

Six feet of social distance may be the new norm between people, but a new WCS report says if you don’t want to disturb wildlife, you need to keep waaaaaaay back.

Newswise: Spring 2021 emergence of Brood X cicadas: Indiana University experts available to comment
Released: 20-Apr-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Spring 2021 emergence of Brood X cicadas: Indiana University experts available to comment
Indiana University

Indiana University experts in biology and ecology are available to comment on the emergence of the Brood X cicadas, a spectacular event that occurs every 17 years in the eastern United States.

Newswise: Mountain high: Andean forests have high potential to store carbon under climate change
Released: 19-Apr-2021 8:45 AM EDT
Mountain high: Andean forests have high potential to store carbon under climate change
Washington University in St. Louis

The Andes Mountains of South America are the most species-rich biodiversity hotspot for plant and vertebrate species in the world. But the forest that climbs up this mountain range provides another important service to humanity. Andean forests are helping to protect the planet by acting as a carbon sink, absorbing carbon dioxide and keeping some of this climate-altering gas out of circulation, according to new research published in Nature Communications.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 2:20 PM EDT
‘Our Changing Menu’: Warming climate serves up meal remake
Cornell University

How will climate change affect the world’s dinner plates?

Released: 7-Apr-2021 12:55 PM EDT
One of Africa’s Rarest Primates Protected by… Speedbumps
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study revealed that a drastic reduction of deaths of one of Africa’s rarest primates, the Zanzibar red colobus (Piliocolobus kirkii), followed the installation of four speedbumps along a stretch of road where the species frequently crossed.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Your Lawn Could Help Save the Bees
University of Georgia

University of Georgia and U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers identified bees that were collecting pollen from the flowers of a turfgrass called centipedegrass. The researchers have been looking for ways to reverse the decline of pollinator populations by examining centipedegrass as a food source for pollinators, with hopes of normalizing low-maintenance, bee-friendly lawns.

2-Apr-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Plant, Animal Surfaces Inspire Infection-Proof Engineered Implants
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Dragonfly wings, lotus leaves, cicada wings -- thanks to millennia of evolution, nature has optimized the ways these surfaces and others behave to offer antibacterial functionality. An international, interdisciplinary team of researchers is trying to find the best way to translate these features to create nature-inspired bactericidal surfaces for use in medical implants. They discuss the surface structures and chemical compositions for an ideal implant material in the journal Applied Physics Reviews.

Released: 5-Apr-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Fireflies have a potential -- protective 'musical armor' against bats
Tel Aviv University

A new study at Tel Aviv University reveals a possible defense mechanism developed by fireflies for protection against bats that might prey on them.

31-Mar-2021 2:05 PM EDT
How Would Geoengineering Impact Nature?
Stony Brook University

Should humans use technology to put the brakes on global warming? Stratospheric aerosol intervention (SAI) is a climate intervention that has been studied as a way to help cool the Earth. But what would be the consequences to natural systems of SAI? This question is being examined by a large scientific research team.

Released: 31-Mar-2021 6:05 AM EDT
A tale of two forests could reveal path forward for saving endangered lemurs
Washington University in St. Louis

In one Madagascar forest, the trees teem with lemurs. In another forest just 150 miles away, the last few individuals of a small local population may soon be lost. Scientists are joining up to figure out how to best support these two endangered species.

29-Mar-2021 8:05 AM EDT
New oil palm map to inform policy and landscape-level planning
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new map of the extent and year of detection of oil palm plantations will help understand trends in oil palm expansion.


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