Feature Channels: Nature

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Released: 5-May-2021 5:00 PM EDT
UNH Research: More Than One Way for Animals to Survive Climate Change
University of New Hampshire

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire found that to live in hotter more desert-like surroundings, and exist without water, there is more than one genetic mechanism allowing animals to adapt. This is important not only for their survival but may also provide important biomedical groundwork to develop gene therapies to treat human dehydration related illnesses, like kidney disease.

Newswise: Bees thrive where it's hot and dry: A unique biodiversity hotspot located in North America
Released: 5-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Bees thrive where it's hot and dry: A unique biodiversity hotspot located in North America
Pensoft Publishers

The United States-Mexico border traverses through large expanses of unspoiled land in North America, including a newly discovered worldwide hotspot of bee diversity.

Newswise: Meet the freaky fanged frog from the Philippines
Released: 5-May-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Meet the freaky fanged frog from the Philippines
University of Kansas

Researchers at the University of Kansas have described a new species of fanged frog discovered in the Philippines that's nearly indistinguishable from a species on a neighboring island except for its unique mating call and key differences in its genome.

Newswise: How a Yale scientist and REM star named an ant for a Warhol 'Superstar'
Released: 5-May-2021 12:45 PM EDT
How a Yale scientist and REM star named an ant for a Warhol 'Superstar'
Yale University

The ant came in a small vial of ethanol, sealed in a plastic bag, and packed in a small cardboard box. It was addressed to Yale's Douglas B. Booher.

Newswise: Tiny plastic particles in the environment
Released: 4-May-2021 9:25 AM EDT
Tiny plastic particles in the environment
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

The images leave no one cold: giant vortices of floating plastic trash in the world's oceans with sometimes devastating consequences for their inhabitants – the sobering legacy of our modern lifestyle. Weathering and degradation processes produce countless tiny particles that can now be detected in virtually all ecosystems. But how dangerous are the smallest of them, so-called nanoplastics? Are they a ticking time bomb, as alarming media reports suggest? In the latest issue of the journal Nature Nanotechnology, a team from Empa and ETH Zurich examines the state of current knowledge – or lack thereof – and points out how these important questions should be addressed.

Newswise: NSF awards UAH’s Dr. Niemiller $1.029 million 
for groundwater biodiversity study
Released: 3-May-2021 10:40 AM EDT
NSF awards UAH’s Dr. Niemiller $1.029 million for groundwater biodiversity study
University of Alabama Huntsville

A proposal to conduct the first comprehensive assessment of groundwater biodiversity in the central and eastern United States has earned a University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) assistant professor of biological science a five-year, $1.029 million National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award.

Newswise: New View of Species Interactions Offers Clues to Preserve Threatened Ecosystems
Released: 30-Apr-2021 1:25 PM EDT
New View of Species Interactions Offers Clues to Preserve Threatened Ecosystems
University of California San Diego

Scientists from around the world have produced a new analysis—believed to be the most detailed study of specialized ecological data from global forests—that is furthering science’s understanding of species interactions and how diversity contributes to the preservation of ecosystem health.

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Released: 29-Apr-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Using science to serve nature
University of California, Irvine

Amid the extreme aridity of the vast Colorado Desert of eastern San Diego County, a ribbon of greenery allows life to thrive. The Sentenac Cienega area inside Anza-Borrego Desert State Park is more than 100 miles southeast of Irvine. It contains a desert wetland, which is part of the San Felipe Creek watershed that is fed by nearby mountains and ultimately flows into the Salton Sea.

Newswise: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to Launch New Center for Ocean and Climate Research
with Gift from Francis E Fowler IV
Released: 28-Apr-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution to Launch New Center for Ocean and Climate Research with Gift from Francis E Fowler IV
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Woods Hole, Mass. (April 28, 2021) --Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) today announced the establishment of the Francis E. Fowler IV Center for Ocean and Climate to seek new knowledge and new solutions at the intersection of oceanography and climate science. A generous gift from Francis E. Fowler IV established the center and will enable it to immediately commence operations.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Climate crises in Mesopotamia prompted the first stable forms of State
Universita di Bologna

During the Bronze Age, Mesopotamia was witness to several climate crises. In the long run, these crises prompted the development of stable forms of State and therefore elicited cooperation between political elites and non-elites.

Newswise: Keeping Social Distance (From Wildlife)
Released: 21-Apr-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Keeping Social Distance (From Wildlife)
Wildlife Conservation Society

Six feet of social distance may be the new norm between people, but a new WCS report says if you don’t want to disturb wildlife, you need to keep waaaaaaay back.

Newswise: Spring 2021 emergence of Brood X cicadas: Indiana University experts available to comment
Released: 20-Apr-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Spring 2021 emergence of Brood X cicadas: Indiana University experts available to comment
Indiana University

Indiana University experts in biology and ecology are available to comment on the emergence of the Brood X cicadas, a spectacular event that occurs every 17 years in the eastern United States.

Newswise: Mountain high: Andean forests have high potential to store carbon under climate change
Released: 19-Apr-2021 8:45 AM EDT
Mountain high: Andean forests have high potential to store carbon under climate change
Washington University in St. Louis

The Andes Mountains of South America are the most species-rich biodiversity hotspot for plant and vertebrate species in the world. But the forest that climbs up this mountain range provides another important service to humanity. Andean forests are helping to protect the planet by acting as a carbon sink, absorbing carbon dioxide and keeping some of this climate-altering gas out of circulation, according to new research published in Nature Communications.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 2:20 PM EDT
‘Our Changing Menu’: Warming climate serves up meal remake
Cornell University

How will climate change affect the world’s dinner plates?

Released: 7-Apr-2021 12:55 PM EDT
One of Africa’s Rarest Primates Protected by… Speedbumps
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study revealed that a drastic reduction of deaths of one of Africa’s rarest primates, the Zanzibar red colobus (Piliocolobus kirkii), followed the installation of four speedbumps along a stretch of road where the species frequently crossed.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Your Lawn Could Help Save the Bees
University of Georgia

University of Georgia and U.S. Department of Agriculture researchers identified bees that were collecting pollen from the flowers of a turfgrass called centipedegrass. The researchers have been looking for ways to reverse the decline of pollinator populations by examining centipedegrass as a food source for pollinators, with hopes of normalizing low-maintenance, bee-friendly lawns.

2-Apr-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Plant, Animal Surfaces Inspire Infection-Proof Engineered Implants
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Dragonfly wings, lotus leaves, cicada wings -- thanks to millennia of evolution, nature has optimized the ways these surfaces and others behave to offer antibacterial functionality. An international, interdisciplinary team of researchers is trying to find the best way to translate these features to create nature-inspired bactericidal surfaces for use in medical implants. They discuss the surface structures and chemical compositions for an ideal implant material in the journal Applied Physics Reviews.

Released: 5-Apr-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Fireflies have a potential -- protective 'musical armor' against bats
Tel Aviv University

A new study at Tel Aviv University reveals a possible defense mechanism developed by fireflies for protection against bats that might prey on them.

31-Mar-2021 2:05 PM EDT
How Would Geoengineering Impact Nature?
Stony Brook University

Should humans use technology to put the brakes on global warming? Stratospheric aerosol intervention (SAI) is a climate intervention that has been studied as a way to help cool the Earth. But what would be the consequences to natural systems of SAI? This question is being examined by a large scientific research team.

Released: 31-Mar-2021 6:05 AM EDT
A tale of two forests could reveal path forward for saving endangered lemurs
Washington University in St. Louis

In one Madagascar forest, the trees teem with lemurs. In another forest just 150 miles away, the last few individuals of a small local population may soon be lost. Scientists are joining up to figure out how to best support these two endangered species.

Released: 29-Mar-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Natural resources decrease income inequality in resource-rich countries
Ural Federal University

A group of researchers from Russia, Germany, the Czech Republic, and Switzerland contest the common belief that resource-based economies have higher levels of within-country inequality than resource-scarce economies.

29-Mar-2021 8:05 AM EDT
New oil palm map to inform policy and landscape-level planning
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new map of the extent and year of detection of oil palm plantations will help understand trends in oil palm expansion.

Released: 26-Mar-2021 10:05 AM EDT
The persistent danger after landscape fires
University of Vienna

Every year, an estimated four percent of the world's vegetated land surface burns, leaving more than 250 megatons of carbonized plants behind. For the first time, a study by the University of Vienna has now recorded elevated concentrations of environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFR) in these charcoals - in some cases even up to five years after the fire.

Newswise: Butterfly increase and decline related to climate
Released: 22-Mar-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Butterfly increase and decline related to climate
University of Georgia

Climate is likely the biggest driver of butterfly abundance change, according to a new study by University of Georgia entomologists.

Newswise: Carbon uptake in regrowing Amazon forest threatened by climate and human disturbance
17-Mar-2021 10:55 AM EDT
Carbon uptake in regrowing Amazon forest threatened by climate and human disturbance
University of Bristol

Large areas of forests regrowing in the Amazon to help reduce carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, are being limited by climate and human activity.

Newswise: Green space or light at night – how do we improve health?
Released: 18-Mar-2021 9:05 PM EDT
Green space or light at night – how do we improve health?
University of Adelaide

There is a growing body of evidence that exposure to green space is good for our health but a new study from the University of Adelaide has found that this may equally be due to how much light we are exposed to at night.

Newswise: “Ghost Forests” Expanding Along Northeast U.S. Coast
Released: 16-Mar-2021 10:40 AM EDT
“Ghost Forests” Expanding Along Northeast U.S. Coast
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Why are “ghost forests” filled with dead trees expanding along the mid-Atlantic and southern New England coast? Higher groundwater levels linked to sea-level rise and increased flooding from storm surges and very high tides are likely the most important factors, according to a Rutgers study on the impacts of climate change that suggests how to enhance land-use planning.

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Released: 11-Mar-2021 2:05 PM EST
The secrets of the best rainbows on Earth
University of Hawaii at Manoa

Rainbows are some of the most spectacular optical phenomena in the natural world and Hawai'i has an amazing abundance of them.

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Released: 11-Mar-2021 1:55 PM EST
Mapping the best places to plant trees
Cell Press

Reforestation could help to combat climate change, but whether and where to plant trees is a complex choice with many conflicting factors. To combat this problem, researchers reporting in the journal One Earth on December 18 have created the Reforestation Hub, an interactive map of reforestation opportunity in the United States.

Released: 11-Mar-2021 1:35 PM EST
The world's oldest crater from a meteorite isn't an impact crater after all
University of Waterloo

Several years after scientists discovered what was considered the oldest crater a meteorite made on the planet, another team found it's actually the result of normal geological processes.

Newswise: Fossilized feeding frenzy:
Released: 11-Mar-2021 3:05 AM EST
Fossilized feeding frenzy:
University of Vienna

An international team of scientists with Fridgeir Grímsson from the University of Vienna has found a previously unknown fossil fly species in old lake sediments of the Messel Pit, a UNESCO World Heritage Site in Germany. In the stomach of the fossil insect, pollen from various plants could be detected, which allows rare insights into the feeding behavior, the ecology and the role of the fly as a pollinator.

Newswise: Firefly Tourism Takes Flight, Sparking Wonder and Concern
8-Mar-2021 10:55 AM EST
Firefly Tourism Takes Flight, Sparking Wonder and Concern
Tufts University

About 1 million tourists a year seek out the energetic displays of light made by fireflies in habitats across the globe. The authors warn that ecotourism threatens to extinguish firefly populations and outline sustainable measures that can be taken to ensure future generations will enjoy the show.

Newswise: How a ladybug warps space-time
Released: 10-Mar-2021 11:00 AM EST
How a ladybug warps space-time
University of Vienna

Researchers at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences, led by Markus Aspelmeyer have succeeded in measuring the gravitational field of a gold sphere, just 2 mm in diameter, using a highly sensitive pendulum - and thus the smallest gravitational force. The experiment opens up new possibilities for testing the laws of gravity on previously unattained small scales. The results are published in the journal Nature.

Newswise: Here’s How Insects Coax Plants into Making Galls
24-Feb-2021 10:20 AM EST
Here’s How Insects Coax Plants into Making Galls
Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)

Scientists have identified proteins in aphid saliva that can alter plant development. These proteins drive abnormal growths called galls, which give insects a protected place to feed and reproduce.

Released: 1-Mar-2021 12:05 PM EST
The risk of ADHD may be lower if children grow up in green environments
Aarhus University

The amount of green space surrounding children's homes could be important for their risk of developing ADHD. This is shown by new research results from iPSYCH.

Newswise: Search and rescue volunteers from Sandia respond to wilderness misadventures
Released: 1-Mar-2021 11:20 AM EST
Search and rescue volunteers from Sandia respond to wilderness misadventures
Sandia National Laboratories

A dozen Sandia National Laboratories employees volunteer to go off the beaten trail and give back to their community by participating in wilderness searches and rescues. As members of the Albuquerque Mountain Rescue Council, they use their technical expertise to solve the complex challenges involved in finding lost hikers and hoisting injured rock climbers to safety.

Newswise: Freshwater outflow from Beaufort Sea could alter global climate patterns
Released: 25-Feb-2021 11:40 AM EST
Freshwater outflow from Beaufort Sea could alter global climate patterns
Los Alamos National Laboratory

The Beaufort Sea, the Arctic Ocean’s largest freshwater reservoir, has increased its freshwater content by 40 percent over the last two decades, putting global climate patterns at risk.

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Released: 23-Feb-2021 12:05 PM EST
Whale Sharks show remarkable capacity to recover from injuries
University of Southampton

A new study has for the first time explored the rate at which the world's largest fish, the endangered whale shark, can recover from its injuries.

Newswise: Don’t focus on genetic diversity to save our species
Released: 22-Feb-2021 8:05 PM EST
Don’t focus on genetic diversity to save our species
University of Adelaide

Scientists at the University of Adelaide have challenged the common assumption that genetic diversity of a species is a key indicator of extinction risk.

Released: 22-Feb-2021 10:45 AM EST
Using human rights laws may be most effective way of harnessing international legislation to protect
University of Exeter

Using laws governing human rights may be the best way of harnessing international legislation and tribunals to protect the Amazon, a new study shows.

Newswise: Pioneering research reveals gardens are secret powerhouse for pollinators
18-Feb-2021 11:40 AM EST
Pioneering research reveals gardens are secret powerhouse for pollinators
University of Bristol

Home gardens are by far the biggest source of food for pollinating insects, including bees and wasps, in cities and towns, according to new research.

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Released: 19-Feb-2021 2:05 PM EST
Global study of 48 cities finds nature sanitizes 41.7 million tons of human waste a year
Cell Press

The first global-scale assessment of the role ecosystems play in providing sanitation finds that nature provides at least 18% of sanitation services in 48 cities worldwide, according to researchers in the United Kingdom and India.

Newswise: NSU & Coral Restoration Foundation™ Join Forces to Save Coral Diversity
Released: 16-Feb-2021 11:00 AM EST
NSU & Coral Restoration Foundation™ Join Forces to Save Coral Diversity
Nova Southeastern University

Around the world, coral reefs are under pressure from a host of stressors, including global warming, pollution, and disease events. Now, two leading groups – Nova Southeastern University and the Coral Restoration Foundation™ – are teaming up to establish a new “coral ark” for critically endangered coral species where genetically diverse corals will be housed to bank and protect their important genetic diversity.

Newswise: Starling Success Traced to Rapid Adaptation
Released: 9-Feb-2021 11:55 AM EST
Starling Success Traced to Rapid Adaptation
Cornell University

Love them or hate them, there’s no doubt the European Starling is a wildly successful bird. A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines this non-native species from the inside out to learn what exactly happened at the genetic level as the starling population exploded and spread all across North America?

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Released: 8-Feb-2021 1:10 PM EST
Better understanding the reasons behind Arctic amplified warming
École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL)

It's clear that rising greenhouse gas emissions are the main driver of global warming.

Newswise: High CO2 to slow tropical fish move to cooler waters
8-Feb-2021 8:40 AM EST
High CO2 to slow tropical fish move to cooler waters
University of Adelaide

Under increasing global warming, tropical fish are escaping warmer seas by extending their habitat ranges towards more temperate waters. But a new study shows that the ocean acidification predicted under continuing high CO2 emissions may make cooler, temperate waters less welcoming.

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Released: 5-Feb-2021 4:05 PM EST
Mapping hotspots of undersized fish and crustaceans may aid sustainable fishing practices
Frontiers

A new study in Frontiers in Marine Science provides a first-of-its-kind evaluation of which regions of southern European seas are in the most need of fishing restrictions.

Newswise: When the Bloom Is Off
2-Feb-2021 4:05 PM EST
When the Bloom Is Off
Universite de Montreal

In a study published today in Current Biology, Canadian biology professors Simon Joly and Daniel Schoen show that cleistogamy, as this type of self-pollination is known, is strongly associated with bilaterally symmetric flowers, such as orchids, that have a single plane of symmetry instead of multiple ones.

Released: 3-Feb-2021 10:05 AM EST
To Touch and to Smell – a Nature Experience that Creates Happiness
American Technion Society

According to new findings by researcher's at Israel's Technion, the senses -- mainly smell and touch -- are vital in the process that allows us to relax and enjoy nature.


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