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19-May-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Offshore Wind Farms Could Disturb Marine Mammal Behavior #ASA182
Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

When an offshore wind farm pops up, there is a period of noisy but well-studied and in most cases regulated construction. Once the turbines are operational, they provide a valuable source of renewable energy while emitting a constant lower level of sound.

Newswise: More reptile species may be at risk of extinction than previously thought
23-May-2022 11:10 AM EDT
More reptile species may be at risk of extinction than previously thought
PLOS

Machine learning tool estimates extinction risk for species previously unprioritized for conservation.

Released: 25-May-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Newly discovered ancient Amazonian cities reveal how urban landscapes were built without harming nature
University of Exeter

A newly discovered network of “lost” ancient cities in the Amazon could provide a pivotal new insight into how ancient civilisations combined the construction of vast urban landscapes while living alongside nature.

23-May-2022 5:05 AM EDT
Pets or threats? Goldfish might be harmful to biodiversity
Queen's University Belfast

A new study has highlighted the potential threat of pet fish to biodiversity.

Released: 20-May-2022 3:30 PM EDT
Satellites and drones can help save pollinators
University of Exeter

Satellites and drones can provide key information to protect pollinators, researchers say.

Newswise: 'Traffic calming' boosts breeding on coral reefs
Released: 20-May-2022 12:40 PM EDT
'Traffic calming' boosts breeding on coral reefs
University of Exeter

Coral reef fish breed more successfully if motorboat noise is reduced, new research shows.

Released: 19-May-2022 12:45 PM EDT
Researchers propose global initiative to study female health across species
University of California, Santa Barbara

Giraffes have the highest blood pressure of all mammals — up to 300/200, more than double that of a typical human. But pregnant giraffes don’t suffer from pre-eclampsia, a dangerous disorder caused by hypertension.

Newswise: Satellite monitoring of biodiversity moves within reach
Released: 19-May-2022 11:45 AM EDT
Satellite monitoring of biodiversity moves within reach
University of Zurich

Internationally comparable data on biodiversity is needed to protect threatened ecosystems, restore destroyed habitats and counteract the negative effects of global biodiversity loss.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-finds-why-baby-leatherback-marine-turtles-can-t-see-the-sea
VIDEO
Released: 19-May-2022 8:30 AM EDT
Study Finds Why Baby Leatherback Marine Turtles Can’t ‘See the Sea’
Florida Atlantic University

For most sea turtles, the journey to find the ocean from their nests is pretty straightforward. However, leatherback hatchlings more often crawl around in circles trying to find the ocean. Circling delays their entry into the ocean, wastes energy, and places them at greater danger from natural predators. Under different moon phases: bright light during full moon and only starlight under new moon, researchers have a better understanding of why this circling behavior happens and why it is most commonly observed in leatherbacks.

Released: 19-May-2022 1:35 AM EDT
Both nature and nurture contribute to signatures of socioeconomic status in the brain
University of Pennsylvania

Your education, your job, your income, the neighborhood you live in: Together these factors are considered to represent socioeconomic status (SES) and contribute to a variety of health and social outcomes, from physical and mental health to educational achievement and cognitive capacities.

Released: 9-May-2022 3:55 PM EDT
Nonlethal parasites reduce how much their wild hosts eat, leading to ecosystem effects
Washington University in St. Louis

Deer, caribou, bison and other similar animals are often infected by a range of internal parasites, including worms called helminths. Although many of these infections are not lethal, they can still impact health or animal behavior.

Newswise: Brain Size Determined The Chances of Survival Among Large Animals
Released: 9-May-2022 1:25 PM EDT
Brain Size Determined The Chances of Survival Among Large Animals
Tel Aviv University

Researchers at Tel Aviv University, and the University of Naples, have examined the mass extinction of large animals over the past tens of thousands of years and found that extinct species had, on average, much smaller brains than species that survived.

Newswise: These Bats Deter Predators By Buzzing Like Hornets
Released: 9-May-2022 12:00 PM EDT
These Bats Deter Predators By Buzzing Like Hornets
Cell Press

In Batesian mimicry, a harmless species imitates a more dangerous one in an evolutionary “ruse” that affords the mimic protection from would-be predators. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on May 9, 2022, have discovered the first case of acoustic Batesian mimicry in mammals and one of very few documented in any species: greater mouse-eared bats imitate the buzzing sound of a stinging insect to discourage predatory owls from eating them.

Newswise: Consensus approach proposed to protect human health from intentional and wild forest fires
Released: 9-May-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Consensus approach proposed to protect human health from intentional and wild forest fires
University of Washington

Climate change and decades of fire suppression that have increased fuels are contributing to larger and more intense wildfires and, in order to improve forest health and reduce these explosive fires, prescribed and managed fire is necessary.

Released: 4-May-2022 1:30 PM EDT
New report assesses global anti-deforestation measures
International Union of Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO)

Reducing deforestation and forest degradation and their associated carbon emissions (REDD+) is part of the solution to climate change.

Newswise:Video Embedded how-a-soil-microbe-could-rev-up-artificial-photosynthesis
VIDEO
Released: 29-Apr-2022 2:00 PM EDT
How a Soil Microbe Could Rev Up Artificial Photosynthesis
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

When it comes to fixing carbon, plants have nothing on soil bacteria that can do it 20 times faster. The secret is an enzyme that “juggles” reaction ingredients. Scientists hope to optimize this process for producing fuels, antibiotics and other products from CO2.

Newswise: UTEP Receives $5M NIH Grant to Build Imaging and Behavioral Neuroscience Facility
Released: 28-Apr-2022 7:05 PM EDT
UTEP Receives $5M NIH Grant to Build Imaging and Behavioral Neuroscience Facility
University of Texas at El Paso

The Imaging and Behavioral Neuroscience facility will be built on the first floor of the Interdisciplinary Research Building as part of a $5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Released: 28-Apr-2022 3:45 PM EDT
Study: Diminishing Arctic Sea Ice Has Lasting Impacts on Global Climate
University at Albany, State University of New York

As the impacts of climate change are felt around the world, no area is experiencing more drastic changes than the northern polar region.

Released: 28-Apr-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Bird populations in eastern Canada declining due to forest ‘degradation,’ research shows
Oregon State University

Bird species that live in wooded areas are under stress from human-caused changes to forest composition, according to new research led by Oregon State University that quantifies the effects of forest “degradation” on bird habitat.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Climate resilient microalgae could help restore coral reefs
Uppsala University

Coral species exhibit different temperature tolerances.

Newswise: New Study Offers Improved Pathways for Monitoring and Evaluation of Climate Adaptation Conservation Initiatives
Released: 27-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
New Study Offers Improved Pathways for Monitoring and Evaluation of Climate Adaptation Conservation Initiatives
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study offers pathways to improve monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of climate-informed conservation while revealing how practitioners are currently monitoring conservation adaptation projects.

Newswise: Protecting species for the good of global climate
Released: 26-Apr-2022 11:20 AM EDT
Protecting species for the good of global climate
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

When the global community is expected to meet for the second part of the UN Biodiversity Conference in Kunming, China, in autumn, it must also adopt the next generation of UN biodiversity targets.

Newswise: Study looks at Impact of Native American Land Use on Forests
Released: 26-Apr-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Study looks at Impact of Native American Land Use on Forests
State University of New York at Geneseo

In a new article published in the Journal of Biogeography, SUNY Geneseo geographer Associate Professor Stephen Tulowiecki and four undergraduate researchers examined the influence of Native American land use on the composition of historic forests in the Northeastern United States. The team found that Native American settlements and land use had a lesser effect on the distribution of tree species across the region when compared to climate and soil conditions.

Newswise: Meet the forest microbes that can survive megafires
Released: 25-Apr-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Meet the forest microbes that can survive megafires
University of California, Riverside

New UC Riverside research shows fungi and bacteria able to survive redwood tanoak forest megafires are microbial “cousins” that often increase in abundance after feeling the flames.

Newswise: Jiminy's wings turned out as fine as his conscience
Released: 25-Apr-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Jiminy's wings turned out as fine as his conscience
Kyoto University

Three intercellular pathways in crickets signal the formation of dorsal wings.

Released: 22-Apr-2022 4:35 PM EDT
Protected areas can be the beating heart of nature recovery in the UK, but they must be more than lines on a map
British Ecological Society

A new report launched today (22 April) by the British Ecological Society (BES) says that the UK government’s commitment to protect 30% of land and sea by 2030 offers the opportunity to revitalise the contribution of protected areas to nature recovery.

Newswise: Freshwater habitats are fragile pockets of exceptional biodiversity
Released: 22-Apr-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Freshwater habitats are fragile pockets of exceptional biodiversity
University of Arizona

While much research has focused on the striking differences in biodiversity between tropical and temperate regions, another, equally dramatic, pattern has gone largely unstudied: the differences in species richness among Earth's three major habitat types – land, oceans and freshwater.

Newswise: Taylor Swift, the millipede: Scientists name a new species after the singer
Released: 18-Apr-2022 10:50 AM EDT
Taylor Swift, the millipede: Scientists name a new species after the singer
Pensoft Publishers

Taylor Swift, U.S. singer-songwriter known for hits such as “Shake It Off” and “You Belong With Me”, has earned a new accolade—she now has a new species of millipede named in her honor.

Newswise: Lost South American wildflower named “extinctus” rediscovered (but still endangered)
Released: 15-Apr-2022 10:30 AM EDT
Lost South American wildflower named “extinctus” rediscovered (but still endangered)
Field Museum

Scientific names get chosen for lots of reasons-- they can honor an important person, or hint at what an organism looks like or where it’s from. For a tropical wildflower first described by scientists in 2000, the scientific name “extinctus” was a warning.

Newswise: DSCF4063-768x512.jpg
Released: 12-Apr-2022 6:05 PM EDT
Deforestation drives climate change that harms remaining forest
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., April 12, 2022 – In a paper published today in Nature Communications, a team led by scientists from the University of California, Irvine, using climate models and satellite data, reveal for the first time how protecting tropical forests can yield climate benefits that enhance carbon storage in nearby areas. Many climate scientists use computer simulations to mimic the planet’s climate as it exists today and how it may exist in the future as humanity keeps emitting greenhouse gases.

Released: 8-Apr-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Melting ice caps may not shut down ocean current
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Most simulations of our climate’s future may be overly sensitive to Arctic ice melt as a cause of abrupt changes in ocean circulation, according to new research led by scientists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Climate scientists count the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (or AMOC) among the biggest tipping points on the way to a planetary climate disaster.

Newswise: Human activity ‘helped fuel’ red tide events, new study reveals
Released: 8-Apr-2022 9:25 AM EDT
Human activity ‘helped fuel’ red tide events, new study reveals
University of Florida

The study found that while a combination of factors contributes to red tide blooms, human activity has played a consistent role in intensifying them during the past decade.

Newswise: World’s largest International Dark Sky Reserve created by McDonald Observatory, Community Partners
Released: 7-Apr-2022 4:15 PM EDT
World’s largest International Dark Sky Reserve created by McDonald Observatory, Community Partners
University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

The world’s largest International Dark Sky Reserve is coming to Texas and Mexico, thanks to a partnership between The University of Texas at Austin’s McDonald Observatory, The Nature Conservancy, the International Dark-Sky Association (IDA) and many others.

Newswise: Global team of scientists determine 'fingerprint' for how much heat, drought is too much for forests
1-Apr-2022 3:00 PM EDT
Global team of scientists determine 'fingerprint' for how much heat, drought is too much for forests
University of Florida

A new study, “Global field observations of tree die-off reveal hotter-drought fingerprint for Earth’s forests,” compiled a global database of the published locations of climate-induced forest die-off events, from 1970-2018, across 675 locations. After analyzing the climate conditions at each location during each event, researchers found a common ‘hotter-drought fingerprint’ for Earth’s forests, a term that describes the combination of higher temperatures and more frequent droughts for a lethal set of climate conditions.

Newswise: “Tree of life” could help slow climate change
Released: 4-Apr-2022 3:45 PM EDT
“Tree of life” could help slow climate change
University of Leeds

Changing the way fruit is gathered from a “tree of life” could have hugely positive environmental and financial impacts in Amazonia, according to a new study.

Newswise: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and collaborators launch world’s largest kelp map
Released: 4-Apr-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and collaborators launch world’s largest kelp map
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

To further investigate and track kelp growth and survival over time, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, The Nature Conservancy, University of California Los Angeles, and the University of California Santa Barbara have launched the world’s largest map of kelp forest canopies extending from Baja California, Mexico to the Oregon-Washington border.

31-Mar-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Crowdsourcing campaign identifies drivers of tropical forest loss
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

To combat forest loss in the tropics, a new study uses crowdsourcing to identify the drivers of deforestation. The resulting dataset can be used to create high-resolution maps and help policymakers apply the best protection measures.

Newswise: The 25 Happiest U.S. City Park Systems, Ranked by Scientists
24-Mar-2022 10:50 AM EDT
The 25 Happiest U.S. City Park Systems, Ranked by Scientists
University of Vermont

Feeling unhappy? Go find a park—the bigger the better—and try taking a walk outdoors. That’s the takeaway of a major new study measuring the happiness effects of city parks in the 25 largest U.S. cities. The happiness benefit of urban nature on users was akin to the mood spike people experience on holidays like Thanksgiving or New Year’s Day. The research is the largest study of its kind—using massive amounts of data from social media—to quantify the mood boosting benefits on urban nature. The happiest place on Twitter? The great outdoors. The study will appear March 30 at 2 pm EST in PLOS One journal.

Newswise: WVU scientists can discuss rare earth extraction, a potential gamechanger for the U.S. environment and economy
Released: 30-Mar-2022 12:15 PM EDT
WVU scientists can discuss rare earth extraction, a potential gamechanger for the U.S. environment and economy
West Virginia University

Ahead of a West Virginia University scientist’s testimony to a U.S. Senate committee on Thursday (March 31), researchers can discuss the University’s advancements in developing a process to extract rare earths and critical materials from acid mine drainage and coal waste.

Newswise: European earthworms reduce insect populations in North American forests
Released: 30-Mar-2022 10:45 AM EDT
European earthworms reduce insect populations in North American forests
German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig

At least since the last ice age, about 10,000 years ago, there have been almost no earthworms in the northern part of North America.

Newswise: Enjoy the Outdoors: Preparing for Spring Allergies
Released: 28-Mar-2022 9:30 AM EDT
Enjoy the Outdoors: Preparing for Spring Allergies
LifeBridge Health

The arrival of spring makes it easier to get active outdoors, but for many, allergies can be a deterrent to outdoor fun. Learn how to not let allergies keep you from springtime fun in the sun!

Released: 25-Mar-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Yes, microplastics have been found in human blood
Newswise

An article says that microplastics have been found in human blood for the first time. We rate this claim as true, although more studies are needed to determine if these substances in humans are associated with a public health risk.

Newswise: Indian forest loss ‘worse than feared’ due to climate change
Released: 24-Mar-2022 11:45 AM EDT
Indian forest loss ‘worse than feared’ due to climate change
University of Reading

Forest loss in India could become an even bigger problem than anticipated in the coming years, with new research revealing climate change has caused significant recent losses.

Released: 23-Mar-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Neighbourhoods feeling the heat as medium density housing robs suburbs of street and garden trees
University of South Australia

University of South Australia researchers are calling for new national planning policies to mandate the inclusion of trees in any future housing developments and architectural designs.

Newswise: Research finds neighborhood green space tied to lower health care costs
Released: 21-Mar-2022 1:20 PM EDT
Research finds neighborhood green space tied to lower health care costs
Clemson University

A Clemson University faculty member collaborating with researchers from Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research, has found that nature’s benefits may include savings on health care costs. The research, published March 17, 2022 in Environment International, suggests health care systems may spend hundreds of dollars less per person per year on medical care for people living in neighborhoods with the most green space than they do on those living near the least trees, shrubs and grass.

Newswise: Evolution in Chicago’s clover: DePaul University researchers help chart global human impact on nature
Released: 18-Mar-2022 1:35 PM EDT
Evolution in Chicago’s clover: DePaul University researchers help chart global human impact on nature
DePaul University

Jalene LaMontagne, associate professor of ecology, and Windsor Aguirre, associate professor of evolutionary biology, are among hundreds of researchers who collected clover in 160 cities all over the world. The research, published this week in the journal “Science,” offers insight into how urbanization is transforming the genetic properties of plants and animals around us.

Newswise: Fast-melting alpine permafrost may contribute to rising global temperatures
Released: 15-Mar-2022 12:15 PM EDT
Fast-melting alpine permafrost may contribute to rising global temperatures
University of Arizona

From the ancient sludge of lakebeds in Asia's Tibetan Plateau, scientists can decipher a vision of Earth's future.

Released: 14-Mar-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Scientists estimate invasive insects will kill 1.4 million US street trees by 2050
British Ecological Society

A new study estimates that over the next 30 years, 1.4 million street trees will be killed by invasive insects, costing over 900 million dollars to replace.


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