Feature Channels: Race and Ethnicity

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Released: 7-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Asthma attacks plummeted among Black and hispanic/latinx individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Asthma attacks account for almost 50 percent of the cost of asthma care which totals $80 billion each year in the United States

Released: 7-May-2021 9:30 AM EDT
Study finds racial disparities in concussion symptom knowledge among college athletes
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Among collegiate football players and other athletes, Black athletes recognize fewer concussion-related symptoms than their White counterparts, reports a study in the May/June issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official journal of the Brain Injury Association of America, JHTR is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Released: 6-May-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Addressing Systemic Racism in Academia: Live Expert Panel for May 19, 5:30pm ET
Newswise

Experts from the American Thoracic Society will discuss issues with systemic racism in academia as a follow-up to their session on this topic at the virtual 2021 ATS Annual Conference.

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Embargo will expire: 12-May-2021 4:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 6-May-2021 3:00 PM EDT

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Released: 6-May-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Fear of losing health insurance keeps 1 in 6 workers in their jobs
West Health Institute

One out of every six adult workers (16%) in the United States are staying in jobs they might otherwise leave out of fear of losing their employer-sponsored health insurance, according to a new West Health-Gallup survey of more than 3,800 U.S. adults.

Released: 5-May-2021 5:05 PM EDT
4DMedical Teaming with ATS Diversity Fund to Improve Access and Equity in American Health Care
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

The American Thoracic Society is recognized for its commitment to diversity and inclusion and is respected as a powerful advocate protecting the health of the American people by encouraging increased investment in public health care. During the ATS 2021 International Conference starting May 14, respiratory imaging disruptor 4DMedical is partnering with the ATS to make better health care technologies accessible to those who need it the most.

Newswise: New mutation raises risk for AFib, heart failure for people of color
Released: 5-May-2021 4:55 PM EDT
New mutation raises risk for AFib, heart failure for people of color
University of Illinois at Chicago

A new mutation found in a gene associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation poses a significantly increased risk for heart failure in Black people.

Released: 5-May-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Study Finds More COVID-19 Cases, Deaths for Nursing Homes with More Black Residents
Columbia University School of Nursing

Nursing homes (NHs) with Black residents had higher rates of COVID-19 infection and deaths during the first wave of the pandemic compared to those with no Black residents, according to new research from Columbia University School of Nursing.

Released: 5-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
A Calculator that Predicts Risk of Lung Cancer Underperforms in Diverse Populations
Thomas Jefferson University

Research finds that a commonly used risk-prediction model for lung cancer does not accurately identify high-risk Black patients who could benefit from early screening.

Released: 5-May-2021 12:00 AM EDT
$3.5 Million Grant Supports Effort Led by Penn Medicine to Diversify Alzheimer’s Disease Research
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Department of Health’s CURE program announced it will award a $3.5M grant to Penn Medicine researchers and community partners to address the underrepresentation of Black adults in Alszheimer’s Disease research. The grant supports the Aging Brain Cohort Dedicated to Diversity (ABCD2) study, a research and training initiative led by David Wolk, MD.

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Released: 3-May-2021 2:50 PM EDT
WashU Expert: FDA menthol ban would benefit Black, younger Americans
Washington University in St. Louis

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s proposed ban on menthol-flavored cigarettes and all flavored cigars could be particularly beneficial for Black and young people, says an expert on tobacco control at Washington University in St. Louis.“Around 80% of adult Black smokers and more than half of people age 18-34 use menthol brands,” said Todd Combs, research assistant professor at the Brown School who works on the Advancing Science & Practice in the Retail Environment (ASPiRE) project, which uses agent-based modeling to test the potential impact of retail tobacco policies.

Newswise: “Colorblindness” Complicates Race-related Conversations between White Parents and Preadolescent Children, Study Finds
30-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
“Colorblindness” Complicates Race-related Conversations between White Parents and Preadolescent Children, Study Finds
University of Vermont

When talking to their children about race, white parents' use of phrases like "I don't see race" can send mixed messages to their children about racial socialization and racial ideology.

30-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
The Effects of Eliminating Race-Based Adjustments in Estimates of Kidney Function
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• Clinical equations that estimate individuals’ kidney function include an adjustment for Black race. This study examined the impact of dropping this race adjustment on patient care. • The estimated prevalence of chronic kidney disease among Black adults would double if race adjustments were eliminated. • Eliminating race adjustments could lead to major changes in medication prescribing for Black patients, but it would not negatively affect the accuracy of kidney failure predictions.

Newswise: Care Teams Differ for Black, White Surgical Patients in the Same Hospitals
29-Apr-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Care Teams Differ for Black, White Surgical Patients in the Same Hospitals
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study finds Black patients are more likely to die after their heart bypass surgery if they’re at a hospital where some care teams see mostly white patients and others see mostly Black patients. On the other hand, mortality rates are comparable between Black and white patients after heart bypass surgery when the teams of health care providers at their hospitals all care for patients of all races.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Down the stretch they come: FSU history professor talks about milestone ride for Kentucky Derby jockey
Florida State University

By: Kathleen Haughney | Published: April 29, 2021 | 10:30 am | SHARE: All eyes are on Louisville, Kentucky, this weekend for the annual Run for the Roses. The 147th Kentucky Derby will take place Saturday, May 1, at the famed Churchill Downs with 20 horses competing for the first leg of the Triple Crown.Kendrick Carmouche will be riding the horse Bourbonic.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 9:45 AM EDT
Many Hispanics died of COVID-19 because of work exposure
Ohio State University

Hispanic Americans have died of COVID-19 at a disproportionately high rate compared to whites because of workplace exposure to the virus, a new study suggests.

Newswise: Republicans Became More Vaccine Hesitant as the Coronavirus Pandemic Unfolded
Released: 28-Apr-2021 9:05 PM EDT
Republicans Became More Vaccine Hesitant as the Coronavirus Pandemic Unfolded
University of California San Diego

Individuals who self-identify as Republicans became more skeptical of a potential COVID-19 vaccine and other inoculations, such as the flu shot, over the course of the pandemic, reveals a new study by the University of California San Diego’s Rady School of Management.

Newswise:Video Embedded people-of-color-hardest-hit-by-air-pollution-from-nearly-all-emission-sources
VIDEO
Released: 28-Apr-2021 5:35 PM EDT
People of color hardest hit by air pollution from nearly all emission sources
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A new study that models peoples’ exposure to air pollution—resolved by race-ethnicity and income level—shows that exposure disparities among people of color and white people are driven by nearly all, rather than only a few, emission source types.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Columbia Begins Vision Screening Program for NYC Public Housing Residents
Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Residents of some NYC public housing developments can get free vision screening and eye exams in their building, as part of a new study led by Columbia University’s Department of Ophthalmology.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 8:05 AM EDT
More Than 25% of Infants Not Getting Common Vaccinations, Study Finds
University of Virginia Health System

Researchers Identify Troubling Disparities Along Race, Income, Education Lines

27-Apr-2021 6:15 PM EDT
Integrated Cardiothoracic Residency Continues to be Most Challenging Specialty to Match
American Association for Thoracic Surgery (AATS)

Research presented today at the AATS 101st Annual Meeting, shows that the six year Integrated Cardiothoracic (CT I-6) residency continues to be the most challenging to match, while the pool of applicants has become more diverse.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 2:15 PM EDT
Impact of COVID-19 on racial-ethnic minorities among persons with opioid use disorder
University of Connecticut

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted health disparities for people of color, who have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic.

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VIDEO
Released: 26-Apr-2021 11:20 AM EDT
Why Skin Issues in Patients of Color are Neglected, Mistreated
Cedars-Sinai

With cosmetic procedures in high demand during the pandemic, Cedars-Sinai dermatologist Jasmine Obioha, MD, has seen an unfortunate side effect: botched treatments for patients of color.

Newswise: Stigma Remains a Barrier in HIV Prevention and Treatment
Released: 26-Apr-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Stigma Remains a Barrier in HIV Prevention and Treatment
Rutgers School of Public Health

Stigma and discrimination, such as homophobia and racism, impede engagement in HIV prevention and use of biomedical tools for treatment in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive gay and bisexual men, according to a Rutgers study.

Released: 23-Apr-2021 10:35 AM EDT
‘Emancipation’s Daughters’ celebrates five iconic Black women
Cornell University

In “Emancipation’s Daughters,” Richardson examines five iconic Black women leaders – Mary McLeod Bethune, Rosa Parks, Condoleezza Rice, Michelle Obama and Beyoncé – who have contested racial stereotypes and constructed new national narratives of Black womanhood in the United States.

Newswise: Rush University Faculty Member Presents at Puerto Rican/Latinx Health Summit
Released: 22-Apr-2021 4:25 PM EDT
Rush University Faculty Member Presents at Puerto Rican/Latinx Health Summit
Rush University Medical Center

During the Puerto Rican/Latinx Health Summit, Lisa Sanchez-Johnsen, PhD, who is a member of the health and wellness team for the Puerto Rican Agenda, presented a talk titled “Puerto Rican-Centered Obesity Research.”

Released: 22-Apr-2021 3:55 PM EDT
UIC students breaking down stereotypes about young Black men
University of Illinois at Chicago

A group at the University of Illinois Chicago is on a mission to break down stereotypes of who young Black men are and what they’re capable of. We Are Men (WAM) is a program at UIC’s Jane Addams College of Social Work.

Newswise: Blacks, Hispanics, Impoverished People Have Worse Survival Rates Among Teens, Adults Under 40 With Cancer
Released: 22-Apr-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Blacks, Hispanics, Impoverished People Have Worse Survival Rates Among Teens, Adults Under 40 With Cancer
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – April 22, 2021 – Being Black or Hispanic, living in high-poverty neighborhoods, and having Medicaid or no insurance coverage are associated with higher mortality in men and women under 40 with cancer, a review by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers found.

Released: 22-Apr-2021 10:00 AM EDT
UChicago Medicine’s community benefit investment totals $567.1 million in fiscal 2020
University of Chicago Medical Center

The UChicago Medicine health system provided $567.1 million in community benefits and services to the South Side, and UChicago Medicine Ingalls Memorial provided $89.5 million to Harvey and nearby areas.

Newswise: Henry Ford Cancer Institute Receives Grant to Reduce Prostate Cancer Disparities Among Black Men
Released: 21-Apr-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Henry Ford Cancer Institute Receives Grant to Reduce Prostate Cancer Disparities Among Black Men
Henry Ford Health System

Henry Ford Cancer Institute has received a $250,000 grant from Pfizer Global Medical Grants and the American Cancer Society to reduce prostate cancer disparities among Black men. While all men are at risk for prostate cancer, Black men are at an increased risk for developing and dying from prostate cancer.

Newswise: TTUHSC Medical Students Educate about COVID-19 Vaccination Misconceptions with Outreach to Hispanic Communities
Released: 21-Apr-2021 2:00 PM EDT
TTUHSC Medical Students Educate about COVID-19 Vaccination Misconceptions with Outreach to Hispanic Communities
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Student members of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) Latino Medical Student Association (LMSA) answered questions and myths about the COVID-19 vaccine for the Hispanic community.

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Released: 21-Apr-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Five factors that led to Chauvin guilty verdicts
Washington University in St. Louis

Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin was convicted April 20 on three charges in the death of George Floyd. Collectively, people across the country breathed a sigh of relief because far too often, the story has been police killing people of color with impunity, says an expert on race and the law at Washington University in St.

Newswise: Johns Hopkins Medicine Mental Health Experts Available for Interviews Following Trial Verdict in Death of George Floyd
Released: 21-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Johns Hopkins Medicine Mental Health Experts Available for Interviews Following Trial Verdict in Death of George Floyd
Johns Hopkins Medicine

The outcome of the highly sensitive trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd can cause many different emotions for people. Last May, Floyd’s death sparked a societal reckoning that prompted protests against racial injustice and police brutality. Demonstrations also took place following the jury’s decision on April 20. How can adults cope with their emotions following the verdict as well as help their children cope?

Released: 20-Apr-2021 5:40 PM EDT
FSU experts available for context after Chauvin verdict
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: April 20, 2021 | 5:23 pm | SHARE: Florida State University has experts available to offer context on topics related to the Derek Chauvin trial and verdict.POLICING AND POLICE REFORMEmma E. Fridel, assistant professor, College of Criminology and Criminal Justice (201) 452-0384; researches violence and aggression with a focus on homicide, including school violence, homicide-suicide, serial and mass murder and fatal officer-citizen encounters.

Newswise: Roswell Park, Wilmot Cancer Institute Collaborate on First Large Study of Immunotherapy in Black Cancer Patients
Released: 20-Apr-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Roswell Park, Wilmot Cancer Institute Collaborate on First Large Study of Immunotherapy in Black Cancer Patients
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

A new collaboration between two Western New York cancer research leaders will help oncologists learn whether Black and white cancer patients respond differently to a game-changing immunotherapy treatment, and seeks to improve the safety and effectiveness of these newer drugs in diverse populations.

Released: 20-Apr-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Diversity in ClimateTech program to support diverse founders leading clean tech startups
Cornell University

Cornell University and Chloe Capital launched Diversity in ClimateTech, a new program to recruit, educate, inspire, and support capitalization in Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC) and women founders developing startups with clean tech innovations.

Newswise: How Racial Violence Affects Black Americans' Mental Health
Released: 20-Apr-2021 11:35 AM EDT
How Racial Violence Affects Black Americans' Mental Health
Washington University in St. Louis

Black Americans experience an increase in poor mental health days during weeks when two or more incidents of anti-Black violence occur and when national interest surrounding the events is higher, according to a new study.

20-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Taking Vitamin D Could Lower Heart Disease Risk for People with Dark Skin
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

New research suggests a simple step could help millions of people reduce their risk of heart disease: make sure to get enough vitamin D. Elucidating linkages between skin pigmentation, vitamin D and indicators of cardiovascular health, the new study, combined with evidence from previous research, suggests vitamin D deficiency could contribute to the high rate of heart disease among African Americans.

Newswise: CUR Psychology Division Announces 2021 Psychology Research Awardees
Released: 20-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
CUR Psychology Division Announces 2021 Psychology Research Awardees
Council on Undergraduate Research (CUR)

The Psychology Division of the Council on Undergraduate Research announces the 2021 recipients of its Psychology Research Awards. The recipients are undergraduate students conducting original psychological research, who receive awards of up to $500 per project.


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