Feature Channels: Race and Ethnicity

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Released: 19-May-2022 11:55 AM EDT
Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center Researchers Receive Price Family Foundation Health Equity Research Awards
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

The National Cancer Institute-designated Montefiore Einstein Cancer Center (MECC) has partnered with the Price Family Foundation to fund eight research teams developing novel cancer therapies and improving cancer outcomes for historically marginalized communities in the Bronx.

Newswise: Exploring Cancer and Health Data on Asian American and Pacific Islanders
Released: 19-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Exploring Cancer and Health Data on Asian American and Pacific Islanders
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Cancer health disparities are often identified from population-based surveillance data routinely captured by statewide cancer registries. Antoinette Stroup, PhD, of Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Jersey’s only National Cancer Institute – Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center together with RWJBarnabas Health and Rutgers School of Public Health is the director of the New Jersey State Cancer Registry (NJSCR), explores cancer and health data on the Asian American and Pacific Islander population.

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Embargo will expire: 23-May-2022 9:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 18-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT

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Released: 18-May-2022 2:55 PM EDT
Study chronicles presence of chronic frames of race, gender, and wealth inequality
Carnegie Mellon University

All social inequalities, by definition, involve one group that has more and another that has less. Do people prefer describing inequalities in terms of advantage or disadvantage?

Released: 18-May-2022 1:10 PM EDT
'Honey, Don't Forget the Sunscreen!' Three Beliefs That Affect Sunscreen Use by Older Adults
Wolters Kluwer Health: Lippincott

Reminders from a romantic partner might be an effective way to encourage sunscreen use by people age 50 or older, suggests a study in the May/June issue of The Journal of the Dermatology Nurses' Association, official publication of the Dermatology Nurses' Association. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.

Newswise: The Voting Rights Act Increased Racial Economic Equality That’s Now Diminishing
Released: 17-May-2022 2:05 PM EDT
The Voting Rights Act Increased Racial Economic Equality That’s Now Diminishing
University of California San Diego

As many state legislatures consider weakening voter protections and Congress debates new voting rights laws, recent research from the University of California San Diego’s Rady School of Management reveals that the 1965 Voting Rights Act contributed to improvements of the economic status of Blacks. Conversely, after the Supreme Court rendered the Voting Rights Act ineffective in 2013, it led to economic disenfranchisement for Black families that continues to persist.

Released: 17-May-2022 1:45 PM EDT
Stress could make us more likable, and other Behavioral Science news tips
Newswise

Here are some of the latest articles added to the Behavioral Science channel on Newswise.

Released: 17-May-2022 9:45 AM EDT
Statement by AERA President Rich Milner and AERA Executive Director Felice J. Levine on the Racist Murders in Buffalo
American Educational Research Association (AERA)

The American Education Research Association grieves for all those who lost their lives to, and with all those who suffer from, the racist violence in the assault in Buffalo.

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Embargo will expire: 24-May-2022 12:15 PM EDT Released to reporters: 17-May-2022 8:55 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-May-2022 12:15 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 16-May-2022 3:10 PM EDT
Cervical cancer screening happens less often among sexual minority individuals
Wiley

A recent database analysis reveals that in recent years, sexual minority individuals—those whose sexual orientation differs from societal norms—were less likely to have undergone cervical cancer screening tests than heterosexual counterparts, with Hispanic sexual minority individuals having the lowest screening rates.

Released: 16-May-2022 1:35 PM EDT
The Gun Violence Research Center Research Day
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The Rutgers Gun Violence Research Center – one of few state-funded centers in the nation – hosts its first research day with presentations focused on gun violence and trauma in the Black community, suicide risk, purchasing, non-fatal gun violence, and interpersonal violence in the LBGTQ community.

Newswise: Children in Underserved Communities Are at Increased Risk of Being Admitted to the Pediatric ICU and of Dying There; Black Children at Most Risk
9-May-2022 4:00 PM EDT
Children in Underserved Communities Are at Increased Risk of Being Admitted to the Pediatric ICU and of Dying There; Black Children at Most Risk
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Hospitalized children covered by Medicaid who reside in the poorest neighborhoods are at increased risk of being admitted to the hospital’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) and of dying while there, according to research published at the ATS 2022 international conference. The researchers also found higher mortality rates among Black children treated in PICUs.

Released: 16-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
National AAPI Leader in House at FSU Nursing: Associate Dean Dr. Ahn Leading Research Growth
JMIR Publications

Increasing research excellence and building a supportive community for research growth in nursing and healthcare are the main priorities for Dr. Hyochol “Brian” Ahn, College of Nursing’s Associate Dean for Research.

Newswise: Many Black Men with “Normal” Lung Function May Actually Have Emphysema
9-May-2022 4:00 PM EDT
Many Black Men with “Normal” Lung Function May Actually Have Emphysema
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

A significant percentage of Black men found to have normal lung function after race-based adjustments to spirometry were actually found to have emphysema on their computed tomography (CT) scans, according to research published at the ATS 2022 international conference.

Released: 13-May-2022 3:25 PM EDT
Hispanic people with chest pain wait in ER on average 28 minutes longer than other people
American Heart Association (AHA)

Hispanic people who went to the emergency room (ER) reporting chest pain waited longer than non-Hispanic people to be treated, admitted to the hospital or discharged from the ER, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research Scientific Sessions 2022.

Newswise: Demographics, not bias, best predict traffic stops
Released: 13-May-2022 1:20 PM EDT
Demographics, not bias, best predict traffic stops
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from the lab of Calvin Lai, assistant professor of psychological and brain sciences in Arts & Sciences, suggests demographics, not bias, is the best predictor of racial discrepancy when it comes to who gets pulled over by police.

Released: 13-May-2022 11:35 AM EDT
Asking for ideas boosts collective action
University of Exeter

Members of minority groups can boost collective action by seeking the ideas and perspectives of fellow group members, new research shows.

Newswise: Without Roe v. Wade, Millions Will Travel Farther for Abortion Care
Released: 11-May-2022 3:45 PM EDT
Without Roe v. Wade, Millions Will Travel Farther for Abortion Care
University of Utah

The median distance to a clinic would increase from 40 miles to 113.5 miles. State-level legislation “abortion care deserts” that will disproportionally effect women of color and the impoverished. Large swathes of the country would experience a 100-fold increase in distance to care, particularly in the South, Midwest and Intermountain West.

Released: 11-May-2022 2:15 PM EDT
Same-Race Friends Help Teens Connect to School
Cornell University

In diverse schools, friends of the same race or ethnicity are influential in shaping teenagers’ sense of belonging, finds new research by a multidisciplinary team including Cornell’s Adam Hoffman, an expert in psychology and human development.

Released: 11-May-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Launch Multi-Million Dollar Joint Initiative to Improve Health and Wellbeing in West and Southwest Philadelphia Neighborhoods with Greenspaces, Career Training, and Community Environmental Grants
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The Penn Urban Health Lab, along with 13 community and faith-based organizations, will launch Deeply Rooted, a community-driven program to promote health equity and environmental justice in Black and brown neighborhoods in West and Southwest Philadelphia. Penn Medicine and Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia’s (CHOP) Healthier Together Initiativeare the initial funders for Deeply Rooted, while the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society serves as the lead strategic greenspace implementation partner.

Newswise: Online retail images reveal skin tone discrepancies
Released: 11-May-2022 9:50 AM EDT
Online retail images reveal skin tone discrepancies
Cornell University

Cornell University researchers found that still images of models had statistically lighter skin tones than videos of that same product and model.

Newswise: 7%20Ways%20To%20Harness%20The%20Power%20of%20Diversity.jpg?itok=0zwsM6iL
Released: 10-May-2022 3:10 PM EDT
7 Ways To Harness The Power of Diversity
Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona

What is one way to harness the power of diversity and dispel myths and stereotypes in the workplace? To help you dispel myths and stereotypes in the workplace, we asked CEOs and business leaders this question for their best insights.

Released: 10-May-2022 1:25 PM EDT
“One-size-fits-all” flawed for assessing cardiovascular disease risk among Asian Americans
American Heart Association (AHA)

In a large, retrospective study covering data from the last two decades, death rates for cardiovascular diseases in the U.S. varied among people from various Asian ethnicity subgroups, with death rate trends that stagnated in some subgroups and increased in others, according to new research published today in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.

Released: 10-May-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Seattle health fair offers free screenings, wellness activities for people with diabetes
Endocrine Society

Endocrine experts will deliver free health services to underrepresented communities, including Latinx and Hispanic residents, during EndoCares® Seattle, an in-person health education event being held on May 14.

Newswise: 2022 ATS Fellowship in Health Equity and Diversity Award Winners Named
Released: 10-May-2022 8:00 AM EDT
2022 ATS Fellowship in Health Equity and Diversity Award Winners Named
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

The American Thoracic Society is pleased to announce this year’s winners of the ATS Fellowship in Health Equity and Diversity Award: Aaron Baugh, MD, of the University of California San Francisco; and Jamuna Krishnan, MD, MBA, BS of Weill Medical College of Cornell University.

Released: 9-May-2022 12:10 PM EDT
Racial Gap in Completed Doctor Visits Disappeared in 2020 as Telemedicine Adopted
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

As COVID-19 necessitated the wider adoption of telemedicine, the rate of completed primary care visits for Black patients rose to the same level of non-Black patients, Penn Medicine study finds

Released: 6-May-2022 2:10 PM EDT
New research confirms racism in healthcare settings increases vaccine hesitancy among ethnic minority groups
SAGE Publications UK

A new study examining the associations between racial and ethnic discrimination and COVID-19 vaccine refusal has found that one in ten people from ethnic minority groups who refused a vaccine experienced racial discrimination in a medical setting since the start of the pandemic.

Released: 5-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Underestimating People’s COVID Concerns Undermines Cooperation
Cornell University

Misperceptions of marginalized and disadvantaged communities’ level of concern regarding COVID-19, as well as other issues such as climate change, constitutes a form of social misinformation that may undermine cooperation and trust needed to address collective problems, according to new Cornell-led research.

Released: 5-May-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Ranked No. 5 in the Nation on the 2022 DiversityInc Top Hospitals and Health Systems List
Mount Sinai Health System

The Mount Sinai Health System was ranked No. 5 in the nation on DiversityInc’s Top Hospitals and Health Systems list for 2022.

Released: 4-May-2022 2:55 PM EDT
Mentioning 'white privilege' increases online polarization
University of Michigan

If there's an online discussion about race, using the term "white privilege" can create a polarized situation, say University of Michigan researchers.

Newswise: Research Looks at Racism in Health Care and How to End It
Released: 4-May-2022 12:35 PM EDT
Research Looks at Racism in Health Care and How to End It
University of Oregon

University of Oregon philosopher Camisha Russell’s latest research examines racism in health care and offers some ideas about how to address such structural injustice.

Released: 4-May-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Women and Black adults waited longer in ER for chest pain evaluation
American Heart Association (AHA)

Women (ages 18 to 55) waited longer to be evaluated for chest pain in the emergency room (ER) and received a less thorough evaluation for a possible heart attack than men in the same age range.

Released: 4-May-2022 10:00 AM EDT
University of Maryland Medicine Eliminates Race in Birthing Decisions
University of Maryland Medical Center

University of Maryland Medicine has officially eliminated race as a factor in birthing decisions, replacing a calculator which led doctors to recommend a surgical Cesarean section to Black or Hispanic women who had a previous C-section, compared to women of other races or ethnicities.

Released: 3-May-2022 4:20 PM EDT
Subtle racial slights at work cause job dissatisfaction, burnout for Black employees
Rice University

Black employees face a host of subtle verbal, behavioral and environmental slights related to their physical appearance, work ethic, integrity and more, causing job dissatisfaction and burnout, according to a new study from Rice University.

Released: 3-May-2022 3:00 PM EDT
The latest expert commentary on the U.S. Supreme Court
Newswise

Are you looking for expert commentary on the leaked opinion draft that appears to overturn Roe v. Wade? Newswise has you covered! Below are some of the latest headlines that have been added to the U.S. Supreme Court channel on Newswise.

Newswise: Lessons from the Tuskegee Experiment, 50 Years After Unethical Study Uncovered
28-Apr-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Lessons from the Tuskegee Experiment, 50 Years After Unethical Study Uncovered
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

This year marks 50 years since it came to light that the nation’s leading public health agency, the Public Health Service, conceived an unethical “research study” - the Tuskegee Experiment – that lasted for 40 years. The participants? Black men in a rural community in the South who existed in a state of quasi-slavery, making them extremely vulnerable and the agency’s treatment of them that much more sickening.

Newswise: Affirmative Action Bans Had ‘Devastating Impact’ on Diversity in Medical Schools, UCLA-Led Study Finds
29-Apr-2022 9:05 PM EDT
Affirmative Action Bans Had ‘Devastating Impact’ on Diversity in Medical Schools, UCLA-Led Study Finds
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

In states with bans on affirmative action programs, the proportion of students from underrepresented racial and ethnic minority groups in U.S. public medical schools fell by more than one-third by five years after those bans went into effect.

Newswise: AAOS Commits $1M in Grants to Fuel Diversity, Equity, Access and Inclusion Projects Across Orthopaedics
Released: 2-May-2022 2:00 PM EDT
AAOS Commits $1M in Grants to Fuel Diversity, Equity, Access and Inclusion Projects Across Orthopaedics
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS)

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) announced the creation of the AAOS IDEA Grant Program, a multi-year initiative to inspire diversity, equity and access across the field of orthopaedics. With the intention of awarding a minimum of $1 million over the next five years, the program reaffirms the AAOS’ commitment to lead and prompt real, lasting and measurable change.

Released: 2-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Run for the roses: FSU professor reflects on history of the Kentucky Derby
Florida State University

By: Kathleen Haughney | Published: May 2, 2022 | 9:52 am | SHARE: All eyes are on Churchill Downs this week as the horse racing industry prepares for the 148th Kentucky Derby.Associate Professor of History Katherine Mooney is available to provide expert commentary to reporters covering the event. Mooney is the author of “Race Horse Men,” which examines the generations of Black men who built the racing industry and who were ultimately driven from their jobs with the rise of Jim Crow laws.

Newswise: Exploring Sun Protection Behaviors among U.S. Hispanic Outdoor Workers
Released: 2-May-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Exploring Sun Protection Behaviors among U.S. Hispanic Outdoor Workers
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Carolyn J. Heckman, PhD, co-leader of the Cancer Prevention and Control Program at Rutgers Cancer Institute and an associate professor of medicine at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, is corresponding author and shares more on unburns and sun protection behaviors among male Hispanic outdoor day laborers in the Northeast U.S.

Released: 2-May-2022 8:00 AM EDT
Neighborhoods Most Affected by Racism, Inequities and COVID-19 Pandemic Stressors at a Greater Risk for Preterm Births, Study Finds
Mount Sinai Health System

The cohort study follows women through pregnancy and birth to study if a SARS-CoV-2 infection, the virus that causes COVID-19, is associated with poor pregnancy outcomes.

Released: 29-Apr-2022 3:45 PM EDT
Skeptics of welfare schemes don’t increase with more immigrants
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Some studies suggest that support for the welfare state decreases as immigration diversifies the population. However, recent research from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) shows that the story is probably not that simple.

Released: 29-Apr-2022 3:00 PM EDT
Methods to Establish Race or Ethnicity of Twitter Users: Scoping Review
Journal of Medical Internet Research

Background: A growing amount of health research uses social media data. Those critical of social media research often cite that it may be unrepresentative of the population; however, the suitability of social media data in digital ep...

Newswise: UTEP Receives $5M NIH Grant to Build Imaging and Behavioral Neuroscience Facility
Released: 28-Apr-2022 7:05 PM EDT
UTEP Receives $5M NIH Grant to Build Imaging and Behavioral Neuroscience Facility
University of Texas at El Paso

The Imaging and Behavioral Neuroscience facility will be built on the first floor of the Interdisciplinary Research Building as part of a $5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

Newswise: Educate to Indoctrinate: Education Systems Were First Designed to Suppress Dissent
Released: 28-Apr-2022 7:05 PM EDT
Educate to Indoctrinate: Education Systems Were First Designed to Suppress Dissent
University of California San Diego

Public primary schools were created by states to reinforce obedience among the masses and maintain social order, rather than serve as a tool for upward social mobility, suggests a study from the University of California San Diego.

Newswise:Video Embedded live-event-for-april-28th-the-tuskegee-syphilis-study-50-years-later-why-it-still-matters
VIDEO
Released: 28-Apr-2022 4:05 PM EDT
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT of Live Event for April 28th: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study 50 Years Later. Why It Still Matters
Newswise

It’s been 50 years since the Tuskegee Study was disclosed to the American public. In May, a new riveting account of the Study, when government doctors intentionally withheld effective therapy for syphilis for 40 years in 400 African American men, will be published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. The article explains the deeper everlasting lessons of the study.

Newswise: New Study Shows How Historical Redlining Policies Impacts Access to Behavioral Health Services
Released: 28-Apr-2022 1:50 PM EDT
New Study Shows How Historical Redlining Policies Impacts Access to Behavioral Health Services
George Washington University

Researchers at George Washington University’s Milken Institute School of Public Health found that the structurally racist policy of redlining in the past, is associated with current disparities in the availability of behavioral health clinicians in those same areas.


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