Feature Channels: Race and Ethnicity

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13-Jun-2021 12:05 PM EDT
COVID-19 Pandemic Drinking: Increases Among Women, Black Adults, and People with Children
Research Society on Alcoholism

Risky drinking has been a public health concern in the U.S. for decades, but the significant increase in retail alcohol sales following COVID-19 pandemic stay-at-home orders in particular raised red flags for alcohol researchers. New research has assessed changes in alcohol drinking patterns from before to after the enactment of stay-at-home orders. These results and others will be shared at the 44th annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA), which will be held virtually this year from the 19th - 23rd of June 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

15-Jun-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Higher COVID-19 Mortality Among Black Patients Linked to Unequal Hospital Quality
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

If Black patients were admitted to the same hospitals that serve a majority of White patients, researchers showed their risk of death would drop by 10 percent

Newswise: Juneteenth Recognition Gains Momentum, Significance in Wake of George Floyd, Black Lives Matter Protests
Released: 17-Jun-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Juneteenth Recognition Gains Momentum, Significance in Wake of George Floyd, Black Lives Matter Protests
SUNY Buffalo State College

Juneteenth, the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the end of slavery in the United States, seems poised to become the nation’s newest federally observed holiday. Also known as “Emancipation Day,” “Freedom Day,” or “Jubilee Day,” Juneteenth recognizes the date on which Union Major General Gordon Granger arrived in Galveston, Texas, to inform enslaved African Americans of their freedom: June 19, 1865. This news essentially came two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation became official on January 1, 1863. Two professors put holiday's history and significance into modern context.

Released: 16-Jun-2021 5:15 PM EDT
Most New Jerseyans Say Housing Costs are a Serious Problem; Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Housing Access
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Almost nine in 10 New Jerseyans consider the cost of housing to be a “very serious” (55 percent) or “somewhat serious” (32 percent) problem, according to the latest Rutgers-Eagleton Poll in collaboration with the Housing and Community Development Network of New Jersey. Similarly, eight in 10 feel it is “very” (49 percent) or “somewhat” (32 percent) difficult to find an affordable place to rent in New Jersey based on what they have experienced or heard.

Released: 16-Jun-2021 1:55 PM EDT
UM School of Medicine Researchers Awarded $5 Million NIH Grant to Improve Use of Genetic Risk Scores in Diverse Populations
University of Maryland Medical Center

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have received a $5 million federal grant to pool genomic information from existing and new datasets – predominantly in African and African American populations -- in order to calculate the risk of developing specific diseases. They will use sophisticated modeling and genetic datasets to calculate the risk, known as a polygenic risk score, with an emphasis on studying people from different ancestries.

Released: 16-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Establishing Juneteenth As National Holiday is Opportunity to Create "New America"
Binghamton University, State University of New York

The Senate has unanimously passed a bill to establish Juneteenth, a holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States, as a federal holiday. This is an historic moment and an opportunity to create a “new America,” according to Anne Bailey, professor of history at Binghamton University, State University of New York and director of the Harriet Tubman Center for the Study of Freedom and Equity.

Released: 16-Jun-2021 11:35 AM EDT
How Conversations About Race Can Help Black Parents Improve Adolescents' Psychological Outcomes
University of Michigan

Black parents' experiences of racial discrimination can negatively affect their children's psychological outcomes—but talking about these experiences and improving racial socialization competency could help prevent these negative outcomes. according to a new study by a University of Michigan researcher.

Newswise: UIC Project Details History of Urban Displacement in Chicago’s Uptown Neighborhood
Released: 16-Jun-2021 11:25 AM EDT
UIC Project Details History of Urban Displacement in Chicago’s Uptown Neighborhood
University of Illinois at Chicago

Working with graduate and undergraduate students as well as community members in Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood, a new digital research and curricular project led by University of Illinois Chicago professors chronicles almost 200 years of history in the North Side community.

Newswise: CSU Joins Effort to Boost Early Childhood Education in California
Released: 15-Jun-2021 4:05 PM EDT
CSU Joins Effort to Boost Early Childhood Education in California
California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office

Campuses take part in $4.5 million partnership to better align preschool teacher preparation programs with California standards and diversify workforce.

Released: 15-Jun-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Job-related stress threatens the teacher supply - RAND survey
RAND Corporation

Nearly one in four teachers may leave their job by the end of the current (2020-'21) school year, compared with one in six who were likely to leave prior to the pandemic, according to a new RAND Corporation survey. Teachers who identified as Black or African American were particularly likely to consider leaving.

Released: 15-Jun-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Teens Experienced Helplessness When Exposed to Secondhand Racism, Activism Might Help
Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

According to a qualitative study published in JAMA Network Open adolescents expressed feelings of helplessness when exposed to secondhand racism online. Specifically, adolescents described helplessness stemming from the pervasiveness of racism in our society.

Released: 15-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Why Telehealth is Not Meeting the Needs of African Americans with Diabetes
Thomas Jefferson University

Mistrust in physicians kept some Black patients with diabetes from using these services during the pandemic

Released: 15-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Researchers Model Impact and Value of Establishing Blood Pressure Control Programs at Barbershops Nationwide
Beth Israel Lahey Health

In a new paper published in the journal Circulation, researchers built a model to examine the potential impact of implementing similar blood pressure control programs at barbershops nationwide. Modeled off a 2018 randomized trial called the Los Angeles Barbershop Blood Pressure Study (LABBS), the team found that such programs could reach one in three Black men with uncontrolled blood pressure nationally.

Released: 14-Jun-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Accelerates Drive to Diversity, Announces First Biomedical Laureates
Mount Sinai Health System

Less than eight months after unveiling its Biomedical Laureates Program, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai announced today the first Laureates to join its academic faculty, delivering on an institutional commitment to drive diversity and enhance mentorship opportunities. Both Laureates will start in July.

Released: 14-Jun-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Virtual Fireside Chat: Black Liberation In the Workplace
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

To commemorate Juneteenth, Maryland Smith hosts a discussion on June 17 with award-winning marketing and advertising executive Toye Wigley.

Newswise: University of Redlands designated as a Hispanic Serving Institution
Released: 14-Jun-2021 12:05 PM EDT
University of Redlands designated as a Hispanic Serving Institution
University of Redlands

The U.S. Department of Education has designated the University of Redlands as a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI), recognizing the institution’s ongoing commitment to serving Hispanic/Latinx Americans among the University’s student populations.

Newswise: University of Redlands Inaugural Juneteenth Event Brings Awareness to Campaign for National Holiday
Released: 11-Jun-2021 3:20 PM EDT
University of Redlands Inaugural Juneteenth Event Brings Awareness to Campaign for National Holiday
University of Redlands

Why do we need to celebrate Juneteenth and why should we fight to make it a national holiday? Those questions and more will be answered during the University of Redlands Inaugural Juneteenth event June 15-17, 2021 at redlands.edu/juneteenth. This virtual event is free and open to the public.

Released: 11-Jun-2021 2:40 PM EDT
FSU Experts Available to Discuss Juneteenth 2021
Florida State University

By: Mark Blackwell Thomas | Published: June 11, 2021 | 2:29 pm | SHARE: In the past year, high-profile incidents of police brutality, protests and mass marches have broadened the national dialogue on race and raised the profile of Juneteenth, a holiday which commemorates the end of slavery in the United States. Union troops arrived in Galveston, Texas, on June 19, 1865, to announce that the Civil War had ended, and all enslaved people were to be freed.

Released: 11-Jun-2021 2:05 AM EDT
Black and White Women Have Same Mutations Linked to Breast Cancer Risk
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The prevalence of genetic mutations associated with breast cancer in Black and white women is the same.

Newswise: Losing Nature Impacts Black, Hispanic, and Low-Income Americans Most
8-Jun-2021 5:10 PM EDT
Losing Nature Impacts Black, Hispanic, and Low-Income Americans Most
University of Vermont

When nature vanishes, people of color and low-income Americans disproportionally lose critical environmental and health benefits--including air quality, crop productivity and disease control--a new study in Nature Communications finds.

5-Jun-2021 9:45 AM EDT
Disparities in Treatment Persist for People with Headache
American Academy of Neurology (AAN)

Disparities exist in the treatment of people with headache disorders because of race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status and geography, according to a review article published in the June 9, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Newswise: Rap-on-Trail-Cover-REVISED-768x994.jpg
Released: 9-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
UCI Experts Produce Guide for Defense Attorneys Fighting Use of Rap Lyrics in Trials
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 9, 2021 — Criminology and legal experts at the University of California, Irvine have released Rap on Trial: A Legal Guide for Attorneys, to help protect artists from having their lyrics used against them in court. Rap lyrics have been introduced as evidence in hundreds of cases, and a high-profile ruling by the Maryland Court of Appeals recently allowed a few lines of rap to help put a man behind bars for 50 years.

Released: 9-Jun-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Breast Cancer Study: African Americans Not Experiencing Complete Response to Extent Other Groups Are
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Researchers at Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center led the largest study to date to suggest an improving trend in pathologic complete response rates over time for U.S. cancer patients of various races. The team's findings, documented in a poster presentation at the 2021 American Society of Clinical Oncology virtual annual meeting (abstract 575), show that African Americans are more likely than patients from any other group to have remaining disease following breast cancer treatment.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 6:30 AM EDT
Older Chinese Americans Can Improve Family Relationships and Cognitive Function Through Acculturation
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Older Chinese immigrants who adjust to their new cultural environment by learning the language, following the country’s media and socializing with local residents can reduce acculturation gap with their adult children and protect their cognitive function, according to a Rutgers study.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 6:05 AM EDT
To Train a Scientist
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

The University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center is using a grant from the American Cancer Society to introduce more underrepresented minority undergraduate students to cancer research

Newswise: Research From Roswell Park and Kaiser Permanente Supports Vitamin D Supplementation for Breast Cancer Patients
Released: 4-Jun-2021 5:10 PM EDT
Research From Roswell Park and Kaiser Permanente Supports Vitamin D Supplementation for Breast Cancer Patients
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

The Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center/Kaiser Permanente Northern California team behind a new study to be highlighted at the ASCO 2021 virtual annual meeting has found that sufficient vitamin D levels at the time of diagnosis are associated with improved outcomes among people with breast cancer.

Released: 4-Jun-2021 9:20 AM EDT
Disparities in COVID-19 Rates among Adults with Kidney Failure in New York City
American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• Among adults with kidney failure undergoing hemodialysis in New York City, Black and Hispanic patients were more likely to develop symptomatic COVID-19 than White patients. • Neighborhood-level social vulnerability factors were associated with COVID-19 incidence among White patients, but these factors did not explain racial/ethnic disparities.

Released: 4-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Preventing suicide among a ‘hidden population’ in public housing
Ohio State University

New research suggests that African American families living in public housing are a “hidden population” when it comes to national suicide prevention efforts.

Newswise: MedStar Washington Hospital Center Named One of Top 50 U.S. Hospitals for Racial Inclusivity
Released: 3-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
MedStar Washington Hospital Center Named One of Top 50 U.S. Hospitals for Racial Inclusivity
MedStar Washington Hospital Center

MedStar Washington Hospital Center has been named the most racially inclusive hospital in Washington, D.C., and ranked 18th among the top 50 most racially inclusive U.S. hospitals by the Lown Institute, a nonpartisan healthcare think tank.

Newswise: Social Justice as Part of the Remedy for What Ails Us
Released: 3-Jun-2021 10:55 AM EDT
Social Justice as Part of the Remedy for What Ails Us
University of California San Diego Health

The T. Denny Sanford Institute for Empathy and Compassion has opened its newest center, focused on addressing issues of social justice in health care.

Released: 3-Jun-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Orphans and exiles: Research shows the impact of family separation
Binghamton University, State University of New York

New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York shows the human trauma and family separation that resulted from the Trump Administration's zero tolerance policy on undocumented immigration.

Released: 2-Jun-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Blacks and Native Americans More Likely to Have COVID-19 Complications Than Whites with Similar Medical Histories
University of Utah Health

Blacks and Native Americans with health problems prior to contracting COVID-19 are more likely to have longer hospital stays, require treatment with a ventilator, and have a higher risk of death than Whites who have similar preexisting conditions, according to a new nationwide study led by University of Utah Health scientists.

Newswise: Nature’s Sunshine Announces Scholarship Fund for Diverse Students
Released: 2-Jun-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Nature’s Sunshine Announces Scholarship Fund for Diverse Students
University of Utah, David Eccles School of Business

Nature’s Sunshine Products, Inc. (Nasdaq: NATR), a leading natural health and wellness company that manufactures high quality herbal and nutritional products, announced the creation of a new scholarship in partnership with the David Eccles School of Business at the University of Utah to support diverse students in their education.

Released: 27-May-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Visits to ‘crisis pregnancy centers’ common in Ohio
Ohio State University

An estimated one in seven Ohio women of adult, reproductive age has visited a crisis pregnancy center, a new study has found. In a survey of 2,529 women, almost 14% said they’d ever attended a center. The prevalence was more than twice as high among Black women and 1.6 times as high among those in the lowest socioeconomic group.

Released: 26-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Adult roles build skills for children of Latinx immigrants
University of Georgia

Children of Latinx immigrants who take on adult responsibilities exhibit higher levels of political activity compared with those who do not, according to University of Georgia researcher Roberto Carlos.

Released: 26-May-2021 11:50 AM EDT
Rutgers Professor Named Cullman Fellow, Awarded NEH Grant for Rep. John Lewis Research
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

David Greenberg started delving into the life of the iconic civil rights leader John Lewis as a way to blend his expertise in the presidency and national politics and tackle the subject of racial equality and justice. The Rutgers-New Brunswick professor launched his book project John Lewis: A Life in Politics, which is to be published by Simon & Schuster, after he traveled to Atlanta in February 2019 for an awe-inspiring meeting to secure the late congressman’s approval.

Newswise: Advancing diversity and inclusion in business requires a common language, knowledge
Released: 26-May-2021 10:50 AM EDT
Advancing diversity and inclusion in business requires a common language, knowledge
Iowa State University

Despite a growing momentum for initiatives to create more diverse and inclusive work spaces, several barriers still exist. To implement meaningful change, a team of researchers says a holistic and systematic approach is needed to ensure everyone is working from the same playbook.

Newswise: Poor Sleep Predicts Long-term Cognitive Decline in Hispanics More So Than in Whites
Released: 26-May-2021 1:30 AM EDT
Poor Sleep Predicts Long-term Cognitive Decline in Hispanics More So Than in Whites
University of Miami Health System, Miller School of Medicine

Poor sleep impacts the risk of long-term cognitive decline in Hispanic/Latino middle aged and older adults differently than it does in non-Hispanic adults, according to research led by University of Miami Miller School of Medicine neurology faculty and the largest long-term study of U.S. Hispanic/Latinos to date.

Released: 25-May-2021 7:00 PM EDT
Cancer Research Institute Celebrates Ninth Annual Cancer Immunotherapy Month™
Cancer Research Institute

Cancer Research Institute celebrates progress in cancer immunotherapy research, announces new initiatives aimed at addressing racial and ethnic disparities in cancer treatment and academic research, during ninth annual Cancer Immunotherapy Month this June.

Released: 25-May-2021 2:30 PM EDT
New Research Highlights Distinctions in White Audience Associations of ‘Black’ and ‘African American’ Label
Association for Psychological Science

A new series of studies to be published by Psychological Science show that White Americans associate the label “Blacks” with being targets of racial bias more than the label “African Americans."

Newswise: Survey Finds Regional, Racial Divides in K-12 Remote Schooling Impact During Pandemic
Released: 25-May-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Survey Finds Regional, Racial Divides in K-12 Remote Schooling Impact During Pandemic
Tufts University

More than 70% of K-12 students across the country experienced some remote schooling during the 2020-21 school year, with stark differences emerging along regional and racial lines and the worst effects on students’ social relationships, according to a new, nationally representative study conducted by Ipsos, using its KnowledgePanel, for the Tufts University Research Group on Equity in Health, Wealth and Civic Engagement.

Released: 25-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
The Political Context and Infant Health in the United States
American Sociological Association (ASA)

Researchers examine how infant health, which has far-reaching implications for future population health, has been impacted by political context, specifically the political party of the president or governor.

Newswise: ATS/Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals Research Grant on COVID-19 in Underrepresented Minorities Awarded
Released: 25-May-2021 8:00 AM EDT
ATS/Mallinckrodt Pharmaceuticals Research Grant on COVID-19 in Underrepresented Minorities Awarded
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

Neelima Navuluri, MD, of Duke University has been awarded the ATS/Mallinckrodt Research Grant on COVID-19 in Underrepresented Minorities.


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