Curated News: Scientific Reports

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Released: 8-Feb-2023 3:45 PM EST
How did ancient extreme climate affect sand in the deep sea?
Stanford University

Geologists are interested in the sedimentary cycle – erosion from mountains that forms sand that is carried out to the ocean – because it’s foundational for understanding how the planet works.

Released: 8-Feb-2023 9:35 AM EST
Spanish lagoon used to better understand wet-to-dry transition of Mars
Cornell University

In the ongoing search for signs of life on Mars, a new study proposes focusing on “time-resolved analogs” – dynamic and similar Earth environments where changes can be analyzed over many years.

Newswise:
Released: 3-Feb-2023 7:50 PM EST
"Time is not what it used to be": Children and adults experience time differently
Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE)

Researchers at Eötvös Loránd University have investigated whether the perception of time changes with age, and if so, how, and why we perceive the passage of time differently. Their study was published in Scientific Reports.

Newswise: Researchers identify the neurons that synchronise female preferences with male courtship songs in fruit flies
Released: 3-Feb-2023 3:25 PM EST
Researchers identify the neurons that synchronise female preferences with male courtship songs in fruit flies
Nagoya University

When it comes to courtship, it is important to ensure that one is interacting with a member of the same species.

   
Released: 31-Jan-2023 1:15 PM EST
Moderate and intense physical activity favors good sleep
Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

An adequate amount of good-quality sleep is essential for the physical and emotional well-being of humans.

Newswise: Is brain learning weaker than artificial Intelligence?
Released: 30-Jan-2023 5:00 AM EST
Is brain learning weaker than artificial Intelligence?
Bar-Ilan University

Can the brain, with its limited realization of precise mathematical operations, compete with advanced artificial intelligence systems implemented on fast and parallel computers? From our daily experience we know that for many tasks the answer is yes! Why is this and, given this affirmative answer, can one build a new type of efficient artificial intelligence inspired by the brain? In an article published today in Scientific Reports, researchers from Bar-Ilan University in Israel solve this puzzle.

Newswise: Metal Alloys to Support to Nuclear Fusion Energy
Released: 24-Jan-2023 3:25 PM EST
Metal Alloys to Support to Nuclear Fusion Energy
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Tungsten heavy alloys show promise for nuclear fusion energy development, according to new research conducted at PNNL.

Released: 23-Jan-2023 2:45 PM EST
A winding road: Mapping how singlet oxygen molecules travel along DNA strands
Tokyo Institute of Technology

Nucleic acid-targeting photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising type of targeted therapy that is being actively researched. This treatment relies on special photosensitizers, a type of drug that binds at specific locations in a cell’s DNA.

Released: 23-Jan-2023 2:40 PM EST
Childhood trauma linked to civic environmental engagement, green behavior
University of Colorado Boulder

Experiencing childhood trauma may lead an individual to volunteer, donate money or contact their elected officials about environmental issues later in life, according to recent research published in Scientific Reports.

   
Newswise: Dogs show things to humans but pigs do not
Released: 23-Jan-2023 2:05 PM EST
Dogs show things to humans but pigs do not
Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE)

Researchers at the Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) Department of Ethology, Budapest investigated if companion pigs and dogs would show their owners the location of a food reward out-of-their reach (but reachable for their owner).

Released: 19-Jan-2023 6:50 PM EST
Marine biology: The genes that made whales gigantic
Scientific Reports

New research reveals the genes that likely allowed whales to grow to giant sizes compared to their ancestors, reports a study published in Scientific Reports.

Released: 16-Jan-2023 4:35 PM EST
The link between mental health and ADHD is strong – so why aren’t we paying attention?
University of Bath

Adults with high levels of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms are more likely to experience anxiety and depression than adults with high levels of autistic traits, according to new research led by psychologists at the University of Bath in the UK.

Released: 16-Jan-2023 1:05 PM EST
Mayo Clinic researchers link ovarian cancer to bacteria colonization in microbiome
Mayo Clinic

A specific colonization of microbes in the reproductive tract is commonly found in women with ovarian cancer, according to a new study from Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine. The discovery, published in Scientific Reports, strengthens evidence that the bacterial component of the microbiome — a community of microorganisms that also consists of viruses, yeasts and fungi — is an important indicator for early detection, diagnosis and prognosis of ovarian cancer.

Newswise: Eavesdropping on the Earth itself
Released: 12-Jan-2023 2:35 PM EST
Eavesdropping on the Earth itself
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

The more-than 1.2 million km of fibre-optic cables that criss-cross the planet carry the world’s phone calls, internet signals and data.

Released: 12-Jan-2023 11:45 AM EST
Placebo: A harmless pill helps reduce feelings of guilt
University of Basel

People don’t always behave impeccably in relationship to others. When we notice that this has inadvertently caused harm, we often feel guilty. This is an uncomfortable feeling and motivates us to take remedial action, such as apologizing or owning up.

Newswise: Japanese macaques: Fish-hunting & change in eating behaviour
Released: 12-Jan-2023 11:35 AM EST
Japanese macaques: Fish-hunting & change in eating behaviour
Shinshu University

Upon further studying using film and sensor cameras, 14 documented cases show these macaques are fishing for sustenance, with an additional six cases of fish capture and feeding being highly likely.

Newswise: Corridors between Western U.S. national parks would greatly increase the persistence time of mammals
9-Jan-2023 12:35 PM EST
Corridors between Western U.S. national parks would greatly increase the persistence time of mammals
University of Utah

A new study analyzed the value of establishing ecological corridors for large mammals between Yellowstone and Glacier National Parks and between Mount Rainier and North Cascades National Parks. These corridors would enlarge populations and species to shift their geographic ranges more readily in response to climate change.

   
Newswise: RUDN researchers assessed the contribution of monocytes to the development of preeclampsia
Released: 11-Jan-2023 4:05 AM EST
RUDN researchers assessed the contribution of monocytes to the development of preeclampsia
Russian Foundation for Basic Research

RUDN University researchers have found a distinctive property of cells in the blood of patients with preeclampsia, a dangerous complication that occurs during pregnancy. The causes of this pathology are still unknown to scientists, but the results obtained may be evidence of one of the hypotheses of the origin of preeclampsia.

Released: 5-Jan-2023 12:40 PM EST
Researchers Identify blood panel to predict placenta accreta
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

Of the nearly 4 million births each year in the United States, roughly 50,000 are marked by life-threatening complications, and up to 900 result in maternal death during delivery.

Newswise: December Research Highlights
Released: 29-Dec-2022 5:45 PM EST
December Research Highlights
Cedars-Sinai

A roundup of the latest medical discoveries and faculty news at Cedars-Sinai.

Newswise: New Bacterial Therapy Approach to Treat Lung Cancer
Released: 23-Dec-2022 2:05 PM EST
New Bacterial Therapy Approach to Treat Lung Cancer
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

Columbia Engineering researchers report that they have developed a new experimental pipeline to combine bacterial therapy with current cancer drugs. Their study, which explores resistance to bacterial therapy at the molecular level, has achieved better treatment efficacy without additional toxicity in laboratory models.

Newswise: Model analysis of atmospheric observations reveals methane leakage in North China
Released: 22-Dec-2022 7:10 PM EST
Model analysis of atmospheric observations reveals methane leakage in North China
National Institute for Environmental Studies

Natural gas is a relatively clean burning fossil fuel, that causes less air pollution than coal and is widely used in the world.

Newswise: Evening hot spring soaks lower cases of hypertension in older Japanese adults
Released: 21-Dec-2022 11:45 AM EST
Evening hot spring soaks lower cases of hypertension in older Japanese adults
Kyushu University

Nothing beats a good soak in a hot bath, and when it really hits the spot, you can almost feel your worries and ailments diffusing out into steam.

Newswise:
Released: 21-Dec-2022 6:05 AM EST
"Survival at work": RUDN medic named the main risk factors for high-altitude enterprises
Russian Foundation for Basic Research

Mining gold high in the mountains is a risky job. Not everyone can endure such workload, so a medical examination is essential for hiring. The RUDN medic with a colleague from Kyrgyzstan found out that the standard contraindications list needs an update. The usual physiological parameters practically do not affect the probability of whether a person will survive at the workplace, but smoking and some other factors can affect this.

Newswise: RUDN University doctors named health risks for workers in the nickel industry
Released: 21-Dec-2022 6:05 AM EST
RUDN University doctors named health risks for workers in the nickel industry
Russian Foundation for Basic Research

RUDN University doctors conducted the first large-scale study of occupational diseases of workers in the electrolysis production of nickel. The most common diseases were bronchitis and asthma, and the most vulnerable group were cleaners of finished products.

Released: 20-Dec-2022 9:55 AM EST
Heat and cold as health hazards
University of Innsbruck

Both hot and cold environments trigger a stress response in the human body and can lead to cardiovascular problems.

Newswise:Video Embedded virtual-reality-game-to-objectively-detect-adhd
VIDEO
Released: 20-Dec-2022 5:05 AM EST
Virtual reality game to objectively detect ADHD
Aalto University

A virtual reality game offers an objective assessment of attention deficit disorders and may lead to an improved therapeutic approach

   
Released: 15-Dec-2022 6:15 PM EST
London Underground polluted with metallic particles small enough to enter human bloodstream
University of Cambridge

The London Underground is polluted with ultrafine metallic particles small enough to end up in the human bloodstream, according to University of Cambridge researchers.

   
Released: 15-Dec-2022 5:55 PM EST
Space health: Healthier diets for astronauts on spaceflights may improve health and performance
Scientific Reports

Astronauts could be given an enhanced diet during spaceflights that includes a greater variety and quantity of fruits, vegetables, and fish to improve their health and performance compared to standard spaceflight food, reports a study published in Scientific Reports.

Newswise: Fossil site reveals giant arthropods dominated the seas 470 million years ago
Released: 13-Dec-2022 1:15 PM EST
Fossil site reveals giant arthropods dominated the seas 470 million years ago
University of Exeter

Discoveries at a major new fossil site in Morocco suggest giant arthropods – relatives of modern creatures including shrimps, insects and spiders – dominated the seas 470 million years ago.

Newswise:Video Embedded novel-wearable-belt-with-sensors-accurately-monitors-heart-failure-247
VIDEO
Released: 12-Dec-2022 8:30 AM EST
Novel Wearable Belt with Sensors Accurately Monitors Heart Failure 24/7
Florida Atlantic University

There is a critical need for non-invasive solutions to monitor heart failure progression around the clock. This novel wearable device is based on sensors embedded in a lightweight belt that monitors thoracic impedance, electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate and motion activity detection. The device was tested in different conditions including sitting, standing, lying down and walking. Findings showed that all of sensors kept track of the changes for all of the different conditions.

   
Released: 8-Dec-2022 7:35 PM EST
Palaeontology: No supersonic boom for dinosaur tails
Scientific Reports

Diplodocids – large herbivorous dinosaurs with long necks and tails – may have been able to move their tails like bullwhips at speeds of up to 33 metres per second (more than 100 kilometres per hour), according to a modelling study published in Scientific Reports.

Newswise: Watching viruses fail
Released: 8-Dec-2022 5:05 AM EST
Watching viruses fail
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Using a new analytical method, Empa researchers have tracked viruses as they pass through face masks and compared their failure on the filter layers of different types of masks. The new method should now accelerate the development of surfaces that can kill viruses, the team writes in the journal Scientific Reports.

   
Newswise: Researchers propose new structures to harvest untapped source of freshwater
Released: 6-Dec-2022 11:05 AM EST
Researchers propose new structures to harvest untapped source of freshwater
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

An almost limitless supply of fresh water exists in the form of water vapor above Earth’s oceans, yet remains untapped, researchers said.

Released: 6-Dec-2022 11:05 AM EST
Twin study links exercise to beneficial epigenetic changes
Washington State University

Consistent exercise can change not just waistlines but the very molecules in the human body that influence how genes behave, a new study of twins indicates.

2-Dec-2022 5:50 PM EST
Vaccine hesitancy predicts future COVID-19 vaccine side effects
Bar-Ilan University

The precise relationship between vaccine hesitancy and COVID-19 vaccination side effects has not previously been explored in vaccinated persons. A fundamental question arises in regard to the directionality of this vaccine hesitancy-vaccine side effect link, namely which variable predicts which. One possibility is that side effects from an earlier dose predict one’s vaccine hesitancy towards a later dose. Alternatively, one’s psychological negativity (hesitancy) towards an earlier dose could predict subsequent side effects from a later vaccination dose. The latter direction reflects a Nocebo effect, i.e., side effects driven by psychological factors rather than by an active treatment component. Results showed only the latter direction to be true. Namely, only earlier vaccine hesitancy towards the second COVID-19 dose predicted subsequent nocebo side-effects following the booster vaccination. To put this in perspective up to 16% of one’s vaccine side effects were explained by earlier va

Newswise:Video Embedded what-does-polly-say-community-science-data-reveal-species-differences-in-vocal-learning-by-parrots
VIDEO
1-Dec-2022 5:05 AM EST
What does Polly say? Community science data reveal species differences in vocal learning by parrots
University of Pittsburgh

While most animals don’t learn their vocalizations, everyone knows that parrots do – they are excellent mimics of human speech. Researchers aim to add to what we know about animal vocal learning by providing the largest comparative analysis to date of parrot vocal repertoires.

Released: 1-Dec-2022 8:10 PM EST
Archaeology: Owl-shaped plaques may have been on Copper Age children’s wish list
Scientific Reports

Ancient owl-shaped slate engraved plaques, dating from around 5,000 years ago in the Iberian Peninsula, may have been created by children as toys, suggests a paper published in Scientific Reports.

Released: 1-Dec-2022 8:00 PM EST
Planetary science: Mars megatsunami may have been caused by Chicxulub-like asteroid impact
Scientific Reports

A Martian megatsunami may have been caused by an asteroid collision similar to the Chicxulub impact – which contributed to the mass extinction of all non-avian dinosaurs on Earth 66 million years ago – in a shallow ocean region, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.

Newswise: Explainable AI-based physical theory for advanced materials design
Released: 29-Nov-2022 10:25 AM EST
Explainable AI-based physical theory for advanced materials design
Tokyo University of Science

Microscopic materials analysis is essential to achieve desirable performance in next-generation nanoelectronic devices, such as low power consumption and high speeds.

Newswise: Just 17 minutes of YouTube videos can drive down prejudice, study reveals
Released: 22-Nov-2022 6:50 PM EST
Just 17 minutes of YouTube videos can drive down prejudice, study reveals
University of Essex

Watching just 17 minutes of YouTubers talking about their struggles with mental health drives down prejudice, University of Essex research has suggested.

Newswise: Study shows chemical coatings can affect microparticles 'swimming' in mucus solutions
Released: 22-Nov-2022 9:35 AM EST
Study shows chemical coatings can affect microparticles 'swimming' in mucus solutions
Southern Methodist University

Collaborative research between SMU nanorobotics authority MinJun Kim’s Biological Actuation, Sensing, and Transport (BAST) Lab and international research and engineering company ARA has demonstrated for the first time that certain chemical coatings, applied to micro/nanoparticles, can alter their swimming propulsion within biological fluids.

Newswise: Monitoring “frothy” magma gases could help evade disaster
Released: 21-Nov-2022 12:55 PM EST
Monitoring “frothy” magma gases could help evade disaster
University of Tokyo

Volcanic eruptions are dangerous and difficult to predict. A team at the University of Tokyo has found that the ratio of atoms in specific gases released from volcanic fumaroles (gaps in the Earth’s surface) can provide an indicator of what is happening to the magma deep below — similar to taking a blood test to check your health.

Newswise: Cultural heritage may influence choice of tools by capuchin monkeys, study suggests
Released: 18-Nov-2022 5:10 PM EST
Cultural heritage may influence choice of tools by capuchin monkeys, study suggests
Sao Paulo Research Foundation (FAPESP)

Capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) are among only a few primates that use tools in day-to-day activities.

Newswise: Novel Device Measures Nerve Activity That May Help Treatment Sepsis and PTSD
Released: 17-Nov-2022 7:30 PM EST
Novel Device Measures Nerve Activity That May Help Treatment Sepsis and PTSD
University of California San Diego

Engineers and physicians at UC San Diego have developed a device to non-invasively measure cervical nerve activity in humans, a new tool they say could potentially inform and improve treatments for patients with sepsis or post-traumatic stress disorder.

   
Released: 11-Nov-2022 2:15 PM EST
What makes mice fat, but not rats? Suppressing neuromedin U, study finds
Okayama University

Our sensory urges ranging from anger to hunger are regulated by hormonal or neuronal signals. Often, these impulses appear as behavioral responses, evoked through complex biological reactions.

Released: 10-Nov-2022 12:00 PM EST
Footprints indicate the presence of man in Southern Spain in the Middle Pleistocene, 200,000 years earlier than previously thought
University of Seville

The researcher and GRS Radioisotopes technician from the University of Seville, Jorge Rivera, has participated in an incredible discovery that is unique in Europe.

Newswise: Grass puffer fish communicate with each other using a non-toxic version of their deadly toxin
Released: 9-Nov-2022 2:40 PM EST
Grass puffer fish communicate with each other using a non-toxic version of their deadly toxin
Nagoya University

A delicacy in Japanese cuisine, puffer fish (fugu) also contain a lethal toxin.

Newswise: Memory and novel object tests for monitoring the cognitive decline of old dogs
Released: 9-Nov-2022 11:35 AM EST
Memory and novel object tests for monitoring the cognitive decline of old dogs
Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE)

Understanding how active, healthy ageing can be achieved is one of the most relevant problems today. Dogs can be used as model animals for studying ageing, and their welfare is also a public concern.


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