Curated News: The Lancet

Filters close
14-Feb-2020 9:20 AM EST
World failing to provide children with a healthy life and a climate fit for their future: WHO-UNICEF-Lancet
World Health Organization (WHO)

As climate and commercial threats intensify, WHO-UNICEF-Lancet Commission presses for radical rethink on child health

19-Nov-2019 11:05 AM EST
New WHO-led study says majority of adolescents worldwide are not sufficiently physically active, putting their current and future health at risk
World Health Organization (WHO)

The first ever global trends for adolescent insufficient physical activity show that urgent action is needed to increase physical activity levels in girls and boys aged 11 to 17 years. The study, published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health journal and produced by researchers from the World Health Organization (WHO), finds that more than 80% of school-going adolescents globally did not meet current recommendations of at least one hour of physical activity per day – including 85% of girls and 78% of boys.

Newswise: 216278_web.jpg
Released: 7-Nov-2019 1:05 PM EST
Galactic fountains and carousels: order emerging from chaos
Royal Astronomical Society

Scientists from Germany and the United States have unveiled the results of a newly-completed

Newswise: New Analysis Predicts Top 25 U.S. Counties at Risk for Measles Outbreaks
8-May-2019 1:00 PM EDT
New Analysis Predicts Top 25 U.S. Counties at Risk for Measles Outbreaks
Johns Hopkins University

A new analysis co-led by The Johns Hopkins University identified 25 United States counties that are most likely to experience measles outbreaks in 2019. The analysis combined international air travel volume, non-medical exemptions from childhood vaccinations, population data and reported measles outbreak information.

Newswise: Man with Quadriplegia Employs Injury Bridging Technologies to Move Again—Just by Thinking
27-Mar-2017 11:30 AM EDT
Man with Quadriplegia Employs Injury Bridging Technologies to Move Again—Just by Thinking
Case Western Reserve University

Bill Kochevar, who was paralyzed below his shoulders in a bicycling accident, is believed to be the first person with quadriplegia in the world to have arm and hand movements restored with the help of two temporarily implanted technologies.

Newswise: Optical Coherence Topography Offers Superior Resolution in Coronary Stent Implantation, According to Study
27-Oct-2016 3:30 PM EDT
Optical Coherence Topography Offers Superior Resolution in Coronary Stent Implantation, According to Study
New York-Presbyterian Hospital

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides safe and improved guidance for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention to treat coronary artery disease, according to results from the ILLUMIEN III: OPTIMIZE PCI trial.

Newswise:Video Embedded surprising-findings-on-deadly-diarrhea-suggest-ways-to-save-children-s-lives
VIDEO
Released: 27-Sep-2016 9:05 AM EDT
Surprising Findings on Deadly Diarrhea Suggest Ways to Save Children's Lives
University of Virginia Health System

New research offers unprecedented insights into the causes of childhood diarrhea, the second-leading cause of death of children worldwide, and suggests that the role of pathogens has been vastly underestimated.

Released: 23-Sep-2016 12:05 PM EDT
Cities of the Future
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University in St. Louis suggests eight interventions that will help create healthier and more sustainable cities of the future, built to reduce the negative impacts of pollution, climate change, noise and crime.

Newswise: Science Can Shape Healthy City Planning
Released: 23-Sep-2016 11:05 AM EDT
Science Can Shape Healthy City Planning
University of California San Diego Health

A three-part series published in The Lancet and released in conjunction with the United Nations quantifies health gains achieved if cities were designed so that shops, facilities, work and public transportation were within walking distance of most residents.In part three of the series, researchers tackle how to implement timely research into city design, planning and policy to improve the health of a city’s residents.

1-Sep-2016 6:30 PM EDT
Implanted Device Successfully Treats Central Sleep Apnea, Study Finds
Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Results from an international, randomized study show that an implanted nerve stimulator significantly improves symptoms in those with central sleep apnea, without causing serious side effects.

Released: 26-Aug-2016 7:05 PM EDT
A Few Extra Pounds Can’t Hurt You — or Can They?
University of Southern California (USC)

Being overweight increases the chances of premature death, said Jonathan Samet of USC. His statement is backed by a four-continent effort involving 239 studies and data from 10.6 million people. The study — one of the largest to date — runs counter to the results of a JAMA, which found that being overweight actually adds to one’s life span.

Newswise: UNC Researcher Provides Recommendations to Stop Violence Against Clinicians in China
16-Aug-2016 1:30 PM EDT
UNC Researcher Provides Recommendations to Stop Violence Against Clinicians in China
University of North Carolina Health Care System

With publications in prestigious medical journals and multimillion dollar federal grants, UNC faculty have shown they are committed to moving the fields of HIV prevention, treatment and cure research forward.

Newswise: How to Get This Country Moving
Released: 1-Aug-2016 2:05 PM EDT
How to Get This Country Moving
Washington University in St. Louis

Greater efforts should be made to actively monitor physical activity as a risk factor in clinical practice, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Newswise: CATCH Identified as Successfully Scaled-Up Physical Activity Intervention
Released: 28-Jul-2016 9:05 AM EDT
CATCH Identified as Successfully Scaled-Up Physical Activity Intervention
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

In a paper published today in a special physical activity series of The Lancet, the Coordinated Approach to Child Health (CATCH) program developed by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) was identified as an excellent example of an evidence-based physical activity intervention that has been successfully scaled up to affect population health.

Released: 27-Jul-2016 6:05 PM EDT
Increase in Physical Activity Lags Despite Calls to Step it Up During the 2012 Olympics
University of California San Diego Health

Ahead of the Summer Olympic Games in London four years ago, researchers reported that physical inactivity was a global pandemic that required urgent action. With the 2016 Games looming, University of California San Diego School of Medicine investigators report little change in activity levels worldwide.

Released: 27-Jul-2016 10:05 AM EDT
'Screen-and-Treat' Scheme for Hepatitis B May Prevent Deadly Complications
Imperial College London

Research into Africa's first 'screen-and-treat' programme for hepatitis B suggests the initiative may reduce deadly complications of the virus.

Released: 25-Jul-2016 9:05 AM EDT
Combining New and Old Drugs Improves Survival for Soft-Tissue Cancer Patients
Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Adding a novel monoclonal antibody therapy called olaratumab to traditional chemotherapy increased median survival by nearly a year in patients with advanced sarcoma, according to a multicenter clinical trial led by researchers at Columbia University Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian.

22-Jul-2016 11:05 AM EDT
Personalized Medicine Meets Thyroid Cancer: Drug Targeting BRAF Mutation Helps Patients
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers from Penn Medicine and other institutions found that treating metastatic thyroid cancer patients harboring a BRAF mutation with the targeted therapy vemurafenib —originally approved for melanoma patients with the mutation—showed promising anti-tumor activity in a third of patients. The results were published in this week’s Lancet Oncology.

Released: 18-Jul-2016 1:05 PM EDT
Rise in Avoidable Diabetes Hospital Visits
University of Leicester

Hospital admissions for a short-term and avoidable complication of diabetes have risen by 39 per cent in the last ten years, a new analysis has concluded.

Released: 13-Jul-2016 10:05 AM EDT
HPV Vaccine Can Protect Women Across a Broad Age Range
University of New Mexico Comprehensive Cancer Center

A research paper published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases reported that the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is safe and efficacious across a wide age range of women. The international study found that it protects against HPV infection in women older than 26 years.

Newswise: Viral Hepatitis is the Seventh Leading Cause of Death Worldwide; U.S. Treatment Interventions Continue To Go Underfunded
Released: 10-Jul-2016 4:05 PM EDT
Viral Hepatitis is the Seventh Leading Cause of Death Worldwide; U.S. Treatment Interventions Continue To Go Underfunded
O'Neill Institute for National & Global Health Law

An article published on July 6, 2016 in The Lancet ranks viral hepatitis infections – specifically both Hepatitis B (HBV) and Hepatitis C (HCV) – as the seventh leading cause of death worldwide in 2013, up from tenth in 1990. …hepatitis C is a critical public health concern that, despite the consistent release of research stating its increasing adverse impact on public health, continues to see woeful underfunding for prevention and treatment initiatives to curtail its spread.

5-Jul-2016 11:30 AM EDT
Despite Advances, HIV Epidemic Continues Among Gay Men Across the Globe
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men continue to have disproportionately high burdens of HIV infection in countries of low, middle and high income around the world, a new study led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health suggests.

Newswise: Piping Hot Drinks May Lead to Cancer of the Esophagus
Released: 15-Jun-2016 1:05 PM EDT
Piping Hot Drinks May Lead to Cancer of the Esophagus
University of Southern California (USC)

Drinking piping hot coffee, tea and the caffeine-infused beverage yerba mate probably causes cancer, the World Health Organization announced Wednesday.

Released: 13-Jun-2016 6:30 PM EDT
Endocrine Society Experts Urge EU to Protect Public from Chemical Exposure
Endocrine Society

To protect human health, Endocrine Society members called on the European Commission to adopt science-based policies for regulating endocrine-disrupting chemicals in an opinion piece published today in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

Newswise: ‘Invisible Wounds of War’ Now Visible
9-Jun-2016 6:30 PM EDT
‘Invisible Wounds of War’ Now Visible
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

Scientists have discovered a unique pattern of scarring in the brains of deceased service members who were exposed to blast injury that differs from those exposed to other types of head injury. This new research was published online June 9 in Lancet Neurology, “Characterisation of Interface Astroglial Scarring in the Human Brain after Blast Exposure: a Post-mortem Case Series.”

Newswise: Low Salt Diets Not Beneficial: Global Study Finds
20-May-2016 6:30 PM EDT
Low Salt Diets Not Beneficial: Global Study Finds
McMaster University

A large worldwide study has found that, contrary to popular thought, low-salt diets may not be beneficial and may actually increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and death compared to average salt consumption.

Released: 17-May-2016 5:00 PM EDT
Care for COPD: Could More Be Done?
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Meilan Han, M.D., an associate professor of internal medicine at the University of Michigan and the medical director of the U-M Women’s Respiratory Health Program, is the lead author on a new report that set out to provide a comprehensive view of COPD care in the U.S.

Newswise:Video Embedded quality-of-life-meets-cure-for-prostate-cancer-treatment
VIDEO
Released: 11-May-2016 11:05 AM EDT
Quality of Life Meets Cure for Prostate Cancer Treatment
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new paper looks at how MRI and a clear understanding of the functional anatomy around the prostate can allow radiation oncologists to plan a course of treatment for patients with prostate cancer that spares these critical structures.

Newswise: Extreme ICU: Study Finds 5% of Patients Account for 33% of Intensive Care & Should Receive Special Focus
3-May-2016 9:30 AM EDT
Extreme ICU: Study Finds 5% of Patients Account for 33% of Intensive Care & Should Receive Special Focus
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Every hospital’s ICU has treated them – the critically ill patients who spend weeks going from crisis to crisis, never quite getting better enough to get out of the ICU, but never quite dying. Now, research shows they really are a different kind of patient.

21-Apr-2016 2:05 PM EDT
Smoking Cessation Drugs Do Not Elevate Risk of Serious Neuropsychiatric Adverse Effects
University of California San Diego Health

Compared to the nicotine patch and a placebo, the smoking cessation aids varenicline (marketed as Chantix in the U.S.) and bupropion (Zyban) do not show a significant increase in neuropsychiatric adverse events, reports an international team of researchers in a study published online April 22 in the journal The Lancet.

11-Apr-2016 12:30 PM EDT
GW Physician Publishes Lancet Review Article on Testosterone Therapy for Transgender Men
George Washington University

George Washington University's Dr. Michael S. Irwig published a review article in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology journal on testosterone therapy for transgender men, calling for more research.

7-Apr-2016 9:05 AM EDT
Millions of Maternal and Child Lives Could Be Saved Every Year for Less Than $5 a Person
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

By spending less than $5 per person on essential health care services such as contraception, medication for serious illnesses and nutritional supplements, millions of maternal and child lives could be saved every year, according to a new analysis led by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Released: 6-Apr-2016 3:05 PM EDT
The Lancet: Number of Adults with Diabetes Reaches 422 Million Worldwide
Lancet

Since 1980, the number of adults with diabetes worldwide has quadrupled from 108 million to 422 million in 2014, according to a new study published in The Lancet. The findings provide the most comprehensive estimates of worldwide diabetes trends to date and show that diabetes is fast becoming a major problem in low and middle income countries.

Released: 4-Apr-2016 6:05 PM EDT
Heart Failure Patients Experience Improved Outcomes Following Investigational Stem Cell Treatment
Cedars-Sinai

An investigational stem cell therapy derived from patients’ own blood marrow significantly improved outcomes in patients with severe heart failure, according to a study from the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute.

31-Mar-2016 9:00 AM EDT
Global Study Finds Neighborhood Design Helps Put Best Foot Forward for Health
University of California San Diego Health

More walkable neighborhoods, parks and public transit could all reduce your chance of becoming one of the 600 million adults who battle obesity worldwide, according to researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. The study, recently published online in The Lancet, found a neighborhood’s design plays a critical role in physical activity and could help reduce non-communicable diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Newswise: Cell Therapy May Mend Damaged Hearts, Study Says
31-Mar-2016 3:05 PM EDT
Cell Therapy May Mend Damaged Hearts, Study Says
University of Utah Health

End-stage heart failure patients treated with stem cells harvested from their own bone marrow experienced 37 percent fewer cardiac events - including deaths and heart failure hospital admissions - than a placebo-controlled group, according to a new study. Results from ixCELL-DCM, the largest cell therapy clinical trial for treating heart failure to date, will be presented at the 2016 American College of Cardiology annual meeting and published online in The Lancet on April 4.

Released: 23-Mar-2016 4:05 PM EDT
A Test to Predict the Risk of Developing TB Disease
South African Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative at the University of Cape Town

A landmark study published this month in the leading medical journal, The Lancet, reports the discovery of a blood test that can predict whether someone is likely to develop tuberculosis (TB) disease, long before the disease manifests.

Newswise: Study Finds Most Female Survivors of Childhood Cancer Have a Good Chance of Becoming Pregnant
21-Mar-2016 7:05 PM EDT
Study Finds Most Female Survivors of Childhood Cancer Have a Good Chance of Becoming Pregnant
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

A new study examines fertility issues in male and female childhood cancer survivors who had received chemotherapy. The study found that while most female survivors still have a good chance of conceiving, male survivors are significantly less likely to father children.

Newswise: High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients May Not Need Annual Screenings
Released: 21-Mar-2016 7:05 PM EDT
High-Risk Lung Cancer Patients May Not Need Annual Screenings
Duke Health

Most high-risk lung cancer patients might not need annual low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screenings if they are cleared of disease in their initial test, according to a study led by a Duke Cancer Institute researcher.

Newswise: Proactively Treating HIV Patients at Risk for Tuberculosis with Multi-Drug TB Regimens Doesn’t Save More Lives
15-Mar-2016 3:05 PM EDT
Proactively Treating HIV Patients at Risk for Tuberculosis with Multi-Drug TB Regimens Doesn’t Save More Lives
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

The number one killer of HIV patients in resource-limited areas, including parts of Africa and India, is tuberculosis (TB), underscoring the need for optimal treatments and effective strategies to address this deadly co-infection. But TB is harder to detect in HIV-infected patients and diagnostic test results take time, so many healthcare providers prescribe multi-drug TB treatments as a precaution. However, for the first time, findings from a large, randomized clinical trial show that this aggressive approach does not save more lives, researchers from Penn Medicine and other institutions report in The Lancet.

17-Mar-2016 2:55 PM EDT
Proactively Treating HIV Patients at Risk for Tuberculosis with Multidrug TB Therapy Doesn’t Save More Lives
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In what investigators say is a surprise finding, results of a new study appear to strongly affirm the effectiveness of prescribing the anti-tuberculosis drug isoniazid alone — in place of the standard four-drug regimen — to prevent TB and reduce death in people with advanced HIV/AIDS infections. Those with HIV and AIDS are highly susceptible to TB.

Released: 10-Mar-2016 8:05 AM EST
Widely Used Kidney Cancer Drugs Can't Stop Recurrence
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Two widely used targeted therapy drugs approved by the FDA for the treatment of metastatic kidney cancer—sorafenib and sunitinib—are no more effective than a placebo in preventing return of the disease to increase life spans of patients suffering from advanced kidney cancer after surgery, according to a new multi-institutional study in the Lancet led by a researcher at the Abramson Cancer Center (ACC) of the University of Pennsylvania.

Newswise: Gut Microbes Linked to Deadly Intestinal Disease in Preemies
8-Mar-2016 5:05 PM EST
Gut Microbes Linked to Deadly Intestinal Disease in Preemies
Washington University in St. Louis

An imbalance of certain gut microbes appears to be the underlying cause of a frequently fatal intestinal illness in premature babies, according to new research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Newswise: Pregnancy Vitamin D Supplementation May Help Winter Baby’s Bones
1-Mar-2016 10:00 AM EST
Pregnancy Vitamin D Supplementation May Help Winter Baby’s Bones
University of Southampton

Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy may lead to stronger bones in babies born during the winter months, a new Southampton study has shown.

Newswise:Video Embedded sweeping-review-of-human-genome-ids-stroke-risk-genes
VIDEO
Released: 29-Feb-2016 3:05 PM EST
Sweeping Review of Human Genome IDs Stroke Risk Genes
University of Virginia Health System

Researchers seeking to better understand how our genes contribute to stroke risk have completed what is believed to be the largest and most comprehensive review of the human genome to identify genes that predispose people to ischemic stroke, the cause of approximately 85 percent of all strokes.

Released: 17-Feb-2016 10:05 AM EST
Immune-Targeting Drug Combo Shows Promise for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients, Say Moffitt Researchers
Moffitt Cancer Center

Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in the United States resulting in more than 158,000 deaths each year. With a 5-year survival rate at only 18 percent, the development of new and improved treatment options is needed. Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are leading the way in the creation of novel therapies. Most recently, Moffitt, in conjunction with partner institutions, initiated a multicenter phase 1b clinical trial to determine the safety and efficacy of a new drug combination for non-small cell lung cancer that stimulates a patient’s immune system to target and kill cancer cells.

Released: 15-Feb-2016 11:05 AM EST
Stroke Risk Increases From Stenting in Older Patients
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Vascular surgery appears to be safer than stenting for patients over 70 years of age with carotid stenosis, or a blockage of the carotid arteries in the neck, according to new findings published in the Lancet.

10-Feb-2016 4:00 PM EST
New Study Confirms Different Generics Have Equal Efficacy When Treating Epilepsy
University of Cincinnati (UC) Academic Health Center

A new study led by Michael Privitera, MD, professor of the Department of Neurology and director of the Epilepsy Center at the University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute, tested two generic lamotrigine (prescription antiepileptic) products and found no detectable difference in clinical effects among patients in the trial. The findings were published this week in an advance online edition of The Lancet Neurology.

Newswise:Video Embedded mayo-researchers-identify-new-borrelia-species-that-causes-lyme-disease
VIDEO
Released: 8-Feb-2016 10:05 AM EST
Mayo Researchers Identify New Borrelia Species that Causes Lyme Disease
Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic researchers, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and health officials from Minnesota, North Dakota and Wisconsin, have discovered a new bacterial species that causes Lyme disease in people. The new species has been provisionally named Borrelia mayonii. Prior to this finding, the only species believed to cause Lyme disease in North America was Borrelia burgdorferi.


Showing results

150 of 56

close
16.08545