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Newswise: CMS COP14, An Historic Opportunity to Protect the Guanaco Migrations
Released: 12-Feb-2024 3:05 PM EST
CMS COP14, An Historic Opportunity to Protect the Guanaco Migrations
Wildlife Conservation Society

This iconic herbivore of the arid grasslands and the Andes Mountains in the Southern Cone, depends on vast and connected habitats to feed, reproduce, and rest.

Newswise: Migratory bats can detect the Earth’s magnetic field
Released: 12-Dec-2023 2:05 PM EST
Migratory bats can detect the Earth’s magnetic field
University of Oldenburg

The soprano pipistrelle (Pipistrellus pygmaeus) weighs only a few grams, but it is estimated that members of this small bat species cover thousands of kilometres every year on their nocturnal migrations from north-eastern to south-western Europe.

Newswise: Study Reveals New Clues About How Whales and Dolphins Came to Use Echolocation
Released: 21-Nov-2023 8:05 AM EST
Study Reveals New Clues About How Whales and Dolphins Came to Use Echolocation
New York Institute of Technology, New York Tech

Research provides new insight into how toothed whales and dolphins evolved to navigate the underwater world using sound waves.

Newswise: Case study of rare, endangered tortoise highlights conservation priorities for present, future World Wildlife Days
Released: 3-Mar-2023 12:05 PM EST
Case study of rare, endangered tortoise highlights conservation priorities for present, future World Wildlife Days
University of Maryland, College Park

Though wildlife trafficking has been effectively disrupted since the first World Wildlife Day—established 50 years ago today via the 1973 Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) of Wild Fauna and Flora—a newly published case study on one of the world’s rarest tortoise species, the ploughshare tortoise, highlights how much room for improvement still exists.

Newswise: Alaskan island wolves caused a deer population to plummet
Released: 24-Jan-2023 2:40 PM EST
Alaskan island wolves caused a deer population to plummet
Oregon State University

Wolves on an Alaskan island caused a deer population to plumet and switched to primarily eating sea otters in just a few years, a finding scientists at Oregon State University and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game believe is the first case of sea otters becoming the primary food source for a land-based predator.

Newswise: Island tiger snakes’ skulls adapt to eat large sea bird chicks
Released: 17-Jan-2023 12:05 AM EST
Island tiger snakes’ skulls adapt to eat large sea bird chicks
University of Adelaide

A study by researchers from the University of Adelaide and other institutions has found that in a population of island tiger snakes the bones in their jaws increase in length after feeding on large prey, while their mainland counterparts show no change.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-over-330-fish-species-up-to-35-new-to-science-found-in-bolivian-national-park
VIDEO
Released: 4-Jan-2023 10:05 AM EST
Study: Over 330 Fish Species – up to 35 New to Science – Found in Bolivian National Park
Wildlife Conservation Society

The number of fish species recorded in Madidi National Park and Natural Integrated Management Area (PNANMI), Bolivia has doubled to a staggering 333 species – with as many as 35 species new to science – according of a study conducted as part of the Identidad Madidi expedition led by the Wildlife Conservation Society.

Newswise: Cheetah marking trees are hotspots for communication also for other species
Released: 2-Dec-2022 11:45 AM EST
Cheetah marking trees are hotspots for communication also for other species
Forschungsverbund Berlin e.V.

Marking trees are important hotspots of communication for cheetahs: Here they exchange information with and about other cheetahs via scent marks, urine and scats.

Newswise: Bats use death metal “growls” to make social calls
22-Nov-2022 12:15 PM EST
Bats use death metal “growls” to make social calls
PLOS

Bats use distinct structures in the larynx to produce high-frequency echolocation calls and lower-frequency social calls, according to a study.

Newswise: Emperor penguins granted protections under Endangered Species Act
Released: 25-Oct-2022 9:40 AM EDT
Emperor penguins granted protections under Endangered Species Act
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) announced that emperor penguins have been listed as a threatened species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) based on evidence that the animal's sea ice habitat is shrinking and is likely to continue to do so over the next several decades. This listing comes more than one year after a USFWS proposal to list the species, and confirms that the animal is at risk of becoming an endangered species--in danger of extinction--in the foreseeable future if its habitat continues to be destroyed or adversely changed.

Newswise: FeederWatchers Are More Important than Ever
Released: 18-Oct-2022 1:35 PM EDT
FeederWatchers Are More Important than Ever
Cornell University

Project FeederWatch is back—with more ways to participate, more time to participate, and more ways to keep track of who is seeing what, where. The expanded 36th season of FeederWatch begins November 1 and ends April 30, 2023.

Newswise: Clarifying the chaos of narwhal behavior
Released: 22-Sep-2022 4:25 PM EDT
Clarifying the chaos of narwhal behavior
Hokkaido University

Researchers have used the mathematical equations of chaos theory to analyse the data from long-term monitoring of an electronically tagged narwhal.

Newswise: Scientists find that wolves can show attachment toward humans
Released: 20-Sep-2022 11:20 AM EDT
Scientists find that wolves can show attachment toward humans
Stockholm University

When it comes to showing affection towards people, many dogs are naturals. Now comes word reported in the journal Ecology and Evolution on September 20th that the remarkable ability to show attachment behaviour toward human caregivers also exists in wolves.

Newswise: More than 1.1 million sea turtles poached over last three decades
Released: 7-Sep-2022 10:50 AM EDT
More than 1.1 million sea turtles poached over last three decades
Arizona State University (ASU)

Despite the high number, first global assessment shows illegal exploitation slightly declining.

Newswise: Venomous! New pit viper discovered in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China
Released: 22-Jul-2022 2:50 PM EDT
Venomous! New pit viper discovered in Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, China
Pensoft Publishers

Jiuzhaigou National Nature Reserve, a World Heritage Site, lies in the transition zone from the eastern edge of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau to the Sichuan Basin in Sichuan Province, China, and occupies an area of 651 km2.

Newswise: After Years of Concern, Monarch Butterflies Are Doing Just Fine, Thank You
Released: 10-Jun-2022 3:50 PM EDT
After Years of Concern, Monarch Butterflies Are Doing Just Fine, Thank You
University of Delaware

Scientists have been warning for quite some time that monarch butterflies were headed for extinction. But to misquote Mark Twain, rumors of their demise were greatly exaggerated. A new study found that growth in the summer population has compensated for losses during the winter.

Newswise: ‘Fantastic giant tortoise,’ believed extinct, confirmed alive in the Galápagos
Released: 9-Jun-2022 4:05 PM EDT
‘Fantastic giant tortoise,’ believed extinct, confirmed alive in the Galápagos
Princeton University

Princeton geneticist Stephen Gaughran recently confirmed that 'Fernanda' comes from the same species as a tortoise collected from Fernandina Island more than a century ago, and those two are genetically distinct from all other Galápagos tortoises.

Newswise: Scientists Show that at Least 44 Percent of Earth’s Land Requires Conservation to Safeguard Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services
Released: 2-Jun-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Scientists Show that at Least 44 Percent of Earth’s Land Requires Conservation to Safeguard Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services
Wildlife Conservation Society

New research published in the June 3, 2022 journal Science reveals that 44 percent of Earth’s land area – some 64 million square kilometers (24.7 million square miles) requires conservation to safeguard biodiversity.

Newswise: California Condor Chick Hatches on Live “Condor Cam”
Released: 19-May-2022 3:50 PM EDT
California Condor Chick Hatches on Live “Condor Cam”
Cornell University

A brand-new endangered California Condor chick hatched on May 14, and viewers can watch live as the little one grows up to become a majestic denizen of the skies.

Newswise:Video Embedded study-finds-why-baby-leatherback-marine-turtles-can-t-see-the-sea
VIDEO
Released: 19-May-2022 8:30 AM EDT
Study Finds Why Baby Leatherback Marine Turtles Can’t ‘See the Sea’
Florida Atlantic University

For most sea turtles, the journey to find the ocean from their nests is pretty straightforward. However, leatherback hatchlings more often crawl around in circles trying to find the ocean. Circling delays their entry into the ocean, wastes energy, and places them at greater danger from natural predators. Under different moon phases: bright light during full moon and only starlight under new moon, researchers have a better understanding of why this circling behavior happens and why it is most commonly observed in leatherbacks.

Newswise: Conservationists Find High DDT and PCB Contamination Risk for Critically Endangered California Coastal Condors
Released: 18-May-2022 2:55 PM EDT
Conservationists Find High DDT and PCB Contamination Risk for Critically Endangered California Coastal Condors
San Diego State University

A new study has found contaminants that were banned decades ago are still imperiling critically endangered California condors.

Newswise: Pterosaur discovery solves ancient feather mystery
Released: 21-Apr-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Pterosaur discovery solves ancient feather mystery
University College Cork

Flying reptiles could change the colour of their feathers, research finds.

Newswise: From ‘boops’ to ‘unks,’ how scientists are using fish sounds to conserve underwater ecosystems
AUDIO
Released: 2-Mar-2022 1:40 PM EST
From ‘boops’ to ‘unks,’ how scientists are using fish sounds to conserve underwater ecosystems
University of Florida

FishSounds.net is the first online, interactive library for the sounds fish make when communicating or interacting with their environment. Fish sounds provide scientists valuable data for studying and conserving underwater ecosystems. An accompanying review study found that just under a 1,000 fish make sounds for communication, though this is likely an underestimate.

Newswise: For female yellowthroats, there’s more than one way to spot a winning mate
11-Feb-2022 10:00 PM EST
For female yellowthroats, there’s more than one way to spot a winning mate
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

One population of female common yellowthroats prefers males with larger black masks, but another group of females favors a larger yellow bib. A new study has found that both kinds of ornaments are linked to superior genes.

Newswise: Latest study reveals no one still knows what the Megalodon really looked like
2-Feb-2022 11:55 AM EST
Latest study reveals no one still knows what the Megalodon really looked like
DePaul University

A new scientific study shows that all previously proposed body forms of the gigantic Megalodon, or megatooth shark, which lived nearly worldwide roughly 15-3.6 million years ago, remain in the realm of speculations.

Newswise: Researchers find grim outlook for animals tied to same habitats
Released: 11-Jan-2022 12:30 PM EST
Researchers find grim outlook for animals tied to same habitats
University of Washington

Wild animals often return to the same places to eat, travel and raise their young. A team found that, while this “consistent” behavior may be beneficial when environmental conditions don’t change very fast, those benefits may not hold up in an ever-changing world dominated by humans.

Released: 11-Nov-2021 8:25 AM EST
Humans hastened the extinction of the woolly mammoth
University of Adelaide

New research shows that humans had a significant role in the extinction of woolly mammoths in Eurasia, occurring thousands of years later than previously thought.

Newswise: Study Documents Nigeria’s Staggering Role in Trafficking of Pangolins
Released: 4-Nov-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Study Documents Nigeria’s Staggering Role in Trafficking of Pangolins
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study in the journal Biological Conservation has documented Nigeria’s staggering role in trafficking of wild pangolins, the anteater-like mammal whose scales are used in traditional Chinese medicines; all international commercial trade in pangolins and their parts is illegal.

Newswise:Video Embedded after-california-s-3rd-largest-wildfire-deer-returned-home-while-trees-were-still-smoldering
VIDEO
26-Oct-2021 12:40 PM EDT
After California’s 3rd-largest wildfire, deer returned home while trees were ‘still smoldering’
University of Washington

While many animals have adapted to live with wildfires of the past — which were smaller, more frequent and kept ecosystems in balance across the West — it’s unclear to scientists how animals are coping with today’s unprecedented megafires. A team of researchers tracked a population of black-tailed deer before, during and after the 2018 Mendocino Complex Fire and found that most of the deer returned home within hours of the fire, while trees were still smoldering.

Released: 13-Oct-2021 6:10 PM EDT
Leprosy confirmed in wild chimpanzees
University of Exeter

Leprosy has been found in wild chimpanzees for the first time, a new study reveals.

Newswise: Man's best friend could be a jaguar's next meal: A case study from the Mexican Caribbean
Released: 11-Oct-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Man's best friend could be a jaguar's next meal: A case study from the Mexican Caribbean
Pensoft Publishers

Mahahual is a small fishing village in the Mexican Caribbean that receives a large number of tourists every year.

Newswise: Vampire bats prefer to forage for blood with friends
16-Sep-2021 4:45 PM EDT
Vampire bats prefer to forage for blood with friends
PLOS

Tagging reveals that closely bonded female bats leave the roost separately but reunite when hunting.

Newswise: Study Says New York Waters may be an Important, Additional Feeding Area for Large Whales
Released: 23-Sep-2021 11:50 AM EDT
Study Says New York Waters may be an Important, Additional Feeding Area for Large Whales
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study finds that that some large whale species (humpback, fin and minke whales) use the waters off New York and New Jersey as a supplemental feeding area feasting on two different types of prey species.

Released: 15-Sep-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Roads have far-reaching impact on chimpanzees
University of Exeter

Roads have a negative impact on chimpanzee populations that can extend for more than 17 km, new research shows.

Newswise: Mountaintop mining causes 40% loss of aquatic biodiversity
Released: 3-Sep-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Mountaintop mining causes 40% loss of aquatic biodiversity
Duke University

Trickling down over rocks, surrounded by wildflowers and ferns, Appalachian mountain streams are chock-full of life.

Released: 23-Aug-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Watch this slow but deadly tortoise hunt a baby bird
Cell Press

A predator doesn’t need to have the quickest speed or reflexes to catch a bird. In a paper publishing August 23 in the journal Current Biology, researchers report the first documented evidence of a tortoise going in for the kill: biting the head of, killing, and eating a tern chick.

Released: 12-Aug-2021 2:30 PM EDT
New Marmoset Species Discovered in Brazilian Amazon
Wildlife Conservation Society

A team of scientists has discovered a new marmoset species in the Brazilian Amazon.

2-Aug-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Giraffes are as socially complex as elephants, study finds
University of Bristol

Scientists at the University of Bristol have discovered evidence that giraffes are a highly socially complex species.

Released: 29-Jul-2021 3:25 PM EDT
Climate Change to Fuel Increase in Human-Wildlife Conflict
University of Washington

Climate change is further exacerbating human-wildlife conflicts by straining ecosystems and altering behaviors, both of which can deepen the contacts — and potential competition — between people and animals.

Released: 8-Jul-2021 2:05 PM EDT
How a Large Cat Deity Helps People Share Space with Leopards in India
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study led by WCS-India documents how a big cat deity worshipped by Indigenous Peoples facilitates coexistence between humans and leopards.

29-Jun-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Global Climate Dynamics Drove the Decline of Mastodonts and Elephants, New Study Suggests
University of Bristol

Elephants and their forebears were pushed into wipeout by waves of extreme global environmental change, rather than overhunting by early humans, according to new research.

Released: 22-Jun-2021 2:15 PM EDT
Research Shows Similarities in Hunters, Animal Rights Advocates
Texas A&M AgriLife

Animal rights advocates and hunters may have more in common than they think when it comes to nature conservancy, according to a newly published study by a Texas A&M AgriLife researcher.

Released: 6-May-2021 12:00 PM EDT
Navigational tools: Sharks use Earth’s magnetic fields to find their way home
Florida State University

Each year, many shark species migrate hundreds of miles, traversing ocean waters to return to the same spot year after year. Now, Florida State University researchers have found that sharks likely use the Earth’s magnetic fields to help guide them on these long-distance journeys.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 12:55 PM EDT
One of Africa’s Rarest Primates Protected by… Speedbumps
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study revealed that a drastic reduction of deaths of one of Africa’s rarest primates, the Zanzibar red colobus (Piliocolobus kirkii), followed the installation of four speedbumps along a stretch of road where the species frequently crossed.

Released: 26-Mar-2021 10:40 AM EDT
International investigation discovers bald eagles’ killer
University of Georgia

Eagle and waterfowl deaths occur in late fall and winter within reservoirs with excess invasive aquatic weeds, and birds can die within five days after arrival.

Released: 17-Mar-2021 11:20 AM EDT
Scientists identify large swath of potential habitat for up to 150 jaguars in Arizona and New Mexico
Wildlife Conservation Society

A team of scientists have identified a wide swath of habitat in Arizona and New Mexico that they say could eventually support more than 150 jaguars.

Released: 11-Mar-2021 11:40 AM EST
Weakened protections led to more disappearances of endangered Mexican wolves
University of Wisconsin–Madison

Mexican wolves in the American Southwest disappeared more quickly during periods of relaxed legal protections, almost certainly succumbing to poaching, according to new research published Wednesday.

Released: 23-Feb-2021 7:45 AM EST
Saki monkeys get screen time for more control over their lives in captivity
Aalto University

Scientists have designed and built an on-demand video device for white-faced saki monkeys to activate as and when they like. It's up to the animals to decide whether they want to step inside the device – the equivalent of pressing play – to watch the video of the week, from sealife like fish and jellyfish to wiggly worms and other zoo animals to abstract art and lush forests.

   
Released: 26-Jan-2021 12:05 PM EST
Southern Africa’s Most Endangered Shark Just Extended its Range by 2,000 Kilometers
Wildlife Conservation Society

A team of marine scientists has confirmed that southern Africa’s most threatened endemic shark – the Critically Endangered shorttail nurse shark (Pseudoginglymostoma brevicaudatum) – has been found to occur in Mozambique; a finding that represents a range extension of more than 2,000 kilometers (1,242 miles).


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