Mayo Clinic Monthly News Tips - October 2017 Headlines

Article ID: 684438

Released: 1-Nov-2017 5:05 PM EDT

Source Newsroom: Mayo Clinic

First clinical 7-Tesla MRI scanner in North America will enable Mayo Clinic to achieve higher-resolution imaging for patients Mayo Clinic will have the first clinical 7-Tesla MRI scanner in North America that has been cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This MRI scanner, the MAGNETOM® Terra, will be operational at Mayo Clinic later in 2017. The manufacturer, Siemens Healthineers, received FDA clearance on Oct. 12 for clinical use of the scanner to image the head and knee. Mayo Clinic will be the first medical center in North America to offer patients advanced diagnostic imaging using an MRI scanner with the strongest magnetic field available for clinical use.

MEDIA CONTACT: Ethan Grove, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Play a ‘heads-up’ game for better hockey safety   More than a half million kids play hockey in the U.S., and there’s an ongoing effort to keep them from getting hurt. The national governing body for the sport, USA Hockey, places a priority on educating players, coaches and parents on how to enjoy the sport safely. Dr. Michael Stuart, a Mayo Clinic orthopedic surgeon, is the organization's chief medical officer. 'Heads Up, Don’t Duck' remains a very important initiative for USA Hockey," says Dr. Stuart, citing a successful part of a training program to help players avoid concussions and spinal cord injuries.

MEDIA CONTACT: Rhoda Madson, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Mayo Clinic to offer CAR T-cell therapy for released non-Hodgkin lymphoma   Mayo Clinic has announced that its Rochester campus is one of 16 cancer centers nationally selected to provide chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy (CAR T-cell therapy) for adults with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma who have not responded to, or have relapsed, after two or more lines of treatment. The therapy, called axicabtagene ciloleucel (Yescarta), is approved to treat subtypes of lymphoma, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arising from follicular lymphoma, and high-grade B-cell lymphoma.

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Dangor, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 507-284-5005, newsbureau@mayo.edu

Pomegranate juice and prostate cancer Recent studies have suggested that drinking pomegranate juice may slow the progression of prostate cancer. While the preliminary findings are encouraging, Erik Castle, M.D., warns they are just that: preliminary. Dr. Castle of Mayo Clinic, Arizona recently answered questions on pomegranate juice and prostate cancer. If you are interested in an interview, he can discuss this and other trends around prostate, bladder and kidney cancer.  

MEDIA CONTACT: Jim McVeigh, Mayo Clinic Public Affairs, 480-301-4368, mcveigh.jim@mayo.edu

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About Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic is a nonprofit organization committed to medical research and education, and providing expert, comprehensive care to everyone who needs healing. For more information, visit mayoclinic.org/about-mayo-clinic or newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org.

 


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