Different approach needed to ‘buy time’ and tackle COVID-19

15-Jul-2020 10:05 PM EDT, by University of South Australia

Newswise — A prominent Australian pharmacologist has called for a new approach to treating COVID-19 as hopes fade of finding an effective vaccine or antiviral before the end of the year.

University of South Australia (UniSA) Emeritus Professor Richard Head says scientists should be focusing on repurposing existing proven drugs to block the acute inflammatory responses to the virus in seriously ill patients.

“We should be treating the host – not necessarily the virus – in the first instance, and buying ourselves time to identify, manufacture and employ drugs and vaccines which target the spread of the virus throughout the body,” Prof Head says.

In a new journal commentary published with colleagues from the University of Newcastle, Prof Head calls for an “urgent, coordinated international approach” led by a taskforce of industry and peak research bodies to save time and minimise duplication.

“By clinically evaluating existing drugs, the goal is to mitigate the life-threatening inflammatory respiratory processes that are a key factor in COVID-19,” he says.

“This deadly and astonishing virus can destroy cells on a grotesque scale, piercing an enzyme called ACE2 to gain entry via the lung and dysregulating normal cell functions.”

ACE2 is the host receptor which provides the entry point for the coronavirus to hook into and infect a wide range of human cells. It is critical to regulating inflammation in many of the body’s organs.

By invading and damaging the enzyme, the SARS-CoV-2 virus disrupts ACE2’s normal regulatory function, sending the immune system off balance and driving severe inflammation.

“We can’t restore broken ACE2, so we need to block and dampen the inflammatory response and take control of what happens when these enzymes are disabled.”

Prof Head says while eliminating the virus is the ideal goal, a new approach is needed immediately to tackle acute cases, which would also take the pressure off health resources and buy valuable time to find a vaccine and antivirals.

“Inevitably, the world needs a solution that can be effective in the absence of a vaccine and antivirals, as social isolation eases and the economy starts to re-open. Realistically, a vaccine may never be developed exactly as planned, or potentially take a year, or years, to be rolled out globally,” he says.




Filters close

Showing results

110 of 2768
31-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT
The effects of COVID-19 on emergency visits, hospitalizations
Mayo Clinic

COVID-19 swept into the U.S., hospitals across the country have reported that their emergency departments are emptying out. In a new study published Monday, Aug. 3, in JAMA Internal Medicine, a team of researchers from multiple institutions provides insights into this phenomenon.

Newswise: Important Dementia Studies Continuing at UK Despite Ongoing COVID-19 Pandemic
Released: 3-Aug-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Important Dementia Studies Continuing at UK Despite Ongoing COVID-19 Pandemic
University of Kentucky

The COVID-19 pandemic brought many things to a screeching halt and continues to impact our daily lives. However, important research at the University of Kentucky’s Sanders-Brown Center on Aging (SBCoA) is continuing under extreme caution and deep dedication. A monumental study in the field of dementia research is set to get underway in the coming weeks at UK.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Neutrolis Announces Development Of First-In-Class Treatment Targeting Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) For Patients With Severe COVID-19
Neutrolis

Novel Chromatinase™ platform could rapidly and systemically removes NETs associated with exacerbation of COVID-19

Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:55 AM EDT
American College of Radiology to Provide Image Coordination for National COVID-19 Observational Study
American College of Radiology (ACR)

The American College of Radiology® (ACR®) Center for Research and Innovation™ (CRI) will serve as the imaging coordination center for the multicenter COVID-19 Observational Study (CORAL) led by Dr. Catherine "Terri" L. Hough of the Oregon Health & Science University. The CORAL Study is part of the Prevention & Early Treatment of Acute Lung Injury (PETAL) Network, a consortium of academic and affiliated hospitals across the United States – funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health – to conduct clinical trials in patients with or at risk for critical illness, including acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:35 AM EDT
Evaluating the effectiveness of travel bans
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new study sheds light on how COVID-19 spreads regionally and between countries, as well as on how effective governmental measures to curb the spread of the pandemic have been to date.

Newswise: Engineers developing no-touch, mail-in, fast-scan test for COVID-19, other outbreaks
Released: 3-Aug-2020 8:00 AM EDT
Engineers developing no-touch, mail-in, fast-scan test for COVID-19, other outbreaks
Iowa State University

Engineers are developing a no-touch, mail-in, fast-scan diagnostic sensing system that could be used to quickly test for COVID-19 or other outbreaks. The system would also produce a real-time outbreak map with demographic details.

Newswise: Atrium Health Tele-ICU Evolves to Meet COVID-19 Challenges
30-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Atrium Health Tele-ICU Evolves to Meet COVID-19 Challenges
American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN)

Atrium Health’s tele-ICU quickly adjusted its patient-centered focus to include supporting and protecting bedside nurses caring for patients in isolation, as part of the system’s planning and preparations for the pandemic.

Released: 31-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Looking up to the Joneses: Consequences of the perceptions of white wealth
Society for Personality and Social Psychology

Before the era of COVID-19, research suggested that premature deaths among white Americans were rising. Even before the era of COVID-19, these findings were surprising.

Newswise: 238996_web.jpg
Released: 31-Jul-2020 4:55 PM EDT
Pooling strategy in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic: A solution for mass population screening of SARS-CoV-2
Elsevier

In a report in the Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, published by Elsevier, researchers at Augusta University and PerkinElmer Genomics describe a cheaper, rapid, and accurate pooling strategy for the RT-PCR-based detection of SARS-CoV-2 in clinical samples.

Released: 31-Jul-2020 4:40 PM EDT
No racial disparities seen in response to remdesivir treatment of COVID-19
University of Chicago Medical Center

A new analysis by University of Chicago Medicine faculty, staff and collaborators around the world found remdesivir appears to be equally beneficial to patients regardless of race, supporting the need for early intervention and aggressive care for all patients in the fight against COVID-19.


Showing results

110 of 2768

close
1.06869