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Newswise: While Promoting Diseases Like Cancer, These Enzymes Also Cannibalize Each Other
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Jan-2020 3:00 PM EST

While Promoting Diseases Like Cancer, These Enzymes Also Cannibalize Each Other

Georgia Institute of Technology

In diseases like cancer, atherosclerosis, and sickle cell anemia, cathepsins promote their propagation. Drug trials to inhibit these enzymes have failed due to baffling side effects. Now a new study examines cathepsins in systems to remove some of the bafflement.

Channels: All Journal News, Grant Funded News, Blood, Cancer, Clinical Trials, Pharmaceuticals,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 10:05 AM EST
Newswise: Dozens of potential anti-cancer drugs netted in massive screening study
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST

Dozens of potential anti-cancer drugs netted in massive screening study

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

A variety of existing drugs for treating conditions such as diabetes, inflammation, alcohol abuse, and arthritis in dogs can also kill cancer cells in the lab, according to a study by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

Channels: All Journal News, Grant Funded News, Cancer, Clinical Trials, Pharmaceuticals, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Nature (journal),

Released:
19-Jan-2020 11:05 AM EST
Research Results

New Drug Prevents Liver Damage, Obesity and Glucose Intolerance in Mice on High-Fat Diet

Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center

Mice given a new drug targeting a key gene involved in lipid and glucose metabolism could tolerate a high-fat diet regimen (composed of 60% fat from lard) without developing significant liver damage, becoming obese, or disrupting their body’s glucose balance.

Channels: Clinical Trials, Liver Disease, Obesity, Pharmaceuticals, Weight Loss, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Grant Funded News,

Released:
20-Jan-2020 10:50 AM EST
Research Results
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Acid reflux drugs may have negative side effects for breast cancer survivors

Ohio State University

Acid reflux drugs that are sometimes recommended to ease stomach problems during cancer treatment may have an unintended side effect: impairment of breast cancer survivors’ memory and concentration.

Channels: Cancer, Clinical Trials, Cognition and Learning, Digestive Disorders, Neuro, Pharmaceuticals, Women's Health, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 10:25 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: JAMA editorial helps set record straight on unproven sepsis therapy
  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jan-2020 6:30 AM EST

JAMA editorial helps set record straight on unproven sepsis therapy

University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC)

The Jan. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) features an important study about sepsis with an accompanying editorial by a University of Nebraska Medical Center expert. The study and editorial sets the record straight on an unproven therapy some physicians use to treat sepsis, a deadly infectious disease. The editorial, written by Andre Kalil, M.D., M.P.H., professor of infectious diseases in the UNMC Department of Internal Medicine, writes in support of the new and rigorous international study based on a randomized clinical trial in Australia, published in the same issue. The editorial appears in the Jan. 17 online issue and also will appear in the Feb. 4 print edition.

Channels: Clinical Trials, Healthcare, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, JAMA, All Journal News, Blood,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 11:50 PM EST
Research Results
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Putting the ‘lazy eye' to work

University of California, Irvine

When University of California, Irvine neurobiologist Carey Y.L. Huh, Ph.D., set her sights on discovering more about amblyopia, she brought personal insight to her quest. As a child, Huh was diagnosed with the condition, which is often called “lazy eye.” he and her colleagues have just found that amblyopia originates in an earlier stage of the visual pathway than was previously thought. Their research, which raises the possibility of new treatment approaches, appears in the Journal of Neuroscience.

Channels: Pharmaceuticals, Vision, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Children's Health, Healthcare, All Journal News, Staff Picks,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 12:20 AM EST
Policy
Newswise: Most Youths Surviving Opioid Overdose Not Getting Timely Treatment to Avoid Recurrence

Most Youths Surviving Opioid Overdose Not Getting Timely Treatment to Avoid Recurrence

Johns Hopkins Medicine

A study of more than 4 million Medicaid claims records during a recent seven-year period concludes that less than a third of the nearly 3,800 U.S. adolescents and young adults who experienced a nonfatal opioid overdose got timely (within 30 days) follow-up addiction treatment to curb or prevent future misuse and reduce the risk of a second overdose.

Channels: Addiction, All Journal News, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Pharmaceuticals, Children's Health, JAMA,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
Research Results

Special delivery: McMaster physicists design ‘super-human’ red blood cells to deliver drugs to specific targets within the body

McMaster University

A team of physicists from McMaster University has developed a process to modify red blood cells so they can be used to distribute drugs throughout the body, which could specifically target infections or treat catastrophic diseases such as cancer or Alzheimer’s.

Channels: All Journal News, Alzheimer's and Dementia, Blood, Cancer, Cell Biology, Pharmaceuticals,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 8:05 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Why can’t Bertrand Might cry? Scientists offer an answer: missing water channels
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2020 8:00 AM EST

Why can’t Bertrand Might cry? Scientists offer an answer: missing water channels

Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have shown that cells from children with NGLY1 deficiency—a rare disorder first described in 2012—lack sufficient water channel proteins called aquaporins. The discovery was published in Cell Reports and may help explain the disorder’s wide-ranging symptoms—including the inability to produce tears, seizures and developmental delays—and opens new avenues to find therapies to treat the disorder.

Channels: Children's Health, Genetics, Healthcare, Pharmaceuticals, Staff Picks, Cell (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 5:05 PM EST
Research Results
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 5:00 PM EST

Global Team Enables Child With a Fatal Genetic Disease to Recover

Mount Sinai Health System

A young boy with a rare genetic disease that typically kills within weeks of birth is now 3 years old and in remission thanks to a collaborative effort that included physicians at King Saud University Department of Pediatrics and immunologists at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

Channels: Genetics, Healthcare, Immunology, Pharmaceuticals, NEJM, All Journal News,

Released:
13-Jan-2020 5:50 PM EST
Research Results


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