Feature Channels: Archaeology and Anthropology

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Newswise: Paleontologists have discovered the jaws of a rare bear in Taurida Cave
Released: 20-May-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Paleontologists have discovered the jaws of a rare bear in Taurida Cave
Ural Federal University

A group of paleontologists, included researchers from the Ural Federal University (UrFU), discovered the jaws of an Etruscan bear from the early Pleistocene period (2–1.5 million years ago) in the Taurida cave.

Newswise: Prehistoric faeces reveal parasites from feasting at Stonehenge
Released: 20-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Prehistoric faeces reveal parasites from feasting at Stonehenge
University of Cambridge

A new analysis of ancient faeces found at the site of a prehistoric village near Stonehenge has uncovered evidence of the eggs of parasitic worms, suggesting the inhabitants feasted on the internal organs of cattle and fed leftovers to their dogs.

Released: 20-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Scientists reveal how seascapes of the ancient world shaped genetic structure of European populations
Trinity College Dublin

Trinity scientists, along with international colleagues, have explored the importance of sea travel in prehistory by examining the genomes of ancient Maltese humans and comparing these with the genomes of this period from across Europe.

Newswise: Research confirms eastern Wyoming Paleoindian site as Americas' oldest mine
Released: 19-May-2022 2:20 PM EDT
Research confirms eastern Wyoming Paleoindian site as Americas' oldest mine
University of Wyoming

Archaeological excavations led by Wyoming’s state archaeologist and involving University of Wyoming researchers have confirmed that an ancient mine in eastern Wyoming was used by humans to produce red ocher starting nearly 13,000 years ago.

Newswise: Tooth unlocks mystery of Denisovans in Asia
Released: 18-May-2022 6:10 PM EDT
Tooth unlocks mystery of Denisovans in Asia
Flinders University

What links a finger bone and some fossil teeth found in a cave in the remote Altai Mountains of Siberia to a single tooth found in a cave in the limestone landscapes of tropical Laos?

Newswise: Chimpanzees combine calls to form numerous vocal sequences
Released: 17-May-2022 11:10 AM EDT
Chimpanzees combine calls to form numerous vocal sequences
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Humans are the only species on earth known to use language. We do this by combining sounds to form words and words to form hierarchically structured sentences.

Newswise: Where were Herod the Great's royal alabaster bathtubs quarried?
Released: 17-May-2022 10:50 AM EDT
Where were Herod the Great's royal alabaster bathtubs quarried?
Bar-Ilan University

From the Middle Bronze Age, Egypt played a crucial role in the appearance of calcite-alabaster artifacts in Israel, and the development of the local gypsum-alabaster industry.

Released: 16-May-2022 1:45 PM EDT
New Paper Explores Ethical Challenges in Microbiome Research
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

A human rights activist and a group of anthropologists and human biologists are casting a critical lens on the way that microbiome research is conducted with Indigenous peoples. While not the first time a call for more ethical research engagement in the biological sciences has been sounded, this approach, published in the May 16 issue of Nature Microbiology, is the first to engage the microbiome sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Newswise: Historic graffiti made by soldiers sheds light on Africa maritime heritage, study shows
Released: 6-May-2022 4:55 PM EDT
Historic graffiti made by soldiers sheds light on Africa maritime heritage, study shows
University of Exeter

Historic graffiti of ships carved in an African fort were drawn by soldiers on guard duty watching the sea, University of Exeter experts believe.

Released: 3-May-2022 4:35 PM EDT
Study of ancient predators sheds light on how humans did – or didn’t – find food
Rice University

A new Rice University-led analysis of the remains of ancient predators reveals new information about how prehistoric humans did – or didn’t – find their food.

Released: 29-Apr-2022 1:45 PM EDT
Research finally answers what Bronze Age daggers were used for
Newcastle University

Analysis of Bronze Age daggers has shown that they were used for processing animal carcasses and not as non-functional symbols of identity and status, as previously thought.

Newswise: News from the climate history of the Dead Sea
Released: 27-Apr-2022 4:05 PM EDT
News from the climate history of the Dead Sea
GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam

The lake level of the Dead Sea is currently dropping by more than one metre every year - mainly because of the heavy water consumption in the catchment area.

Newswise: Before Stonehenge monuments, hunter-gatherers made use of open habitats
21-Apr-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Before Stonehenge monuments, hunter-gatherers made use of open habitats
PLOS

Study investigates habitat conditions encountered by first farmers and monument-builders.

Newswise: Terahertz Imaging Reveals Hidden Inscription on Early Modern Funerary Cross
Released: 25-Apr-2022 4:50 PM EDT
Terahertz Imaging Reveals Hidden Inscription on Early Modern Funerary Cross
Georgia Institute of Technology

Using terahertz imaging and signal processing techniques to look beneath the corroded surface of a 16th-century lead funerary cross, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Georgia Tech-Lorraine revealed an inscription of the Lord's Prayer.

Newswise: Friendship ornaments from the Stone Age
Released: 25-Apr-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Friendship ornaments from the Stone Age
University of Helsinki

As most archaeological material is found in a fragmented state, the phenomenon has been considered a natural consequence of objects' having been long buried underground.

Newswise: Marine mollusc shells reveal how prehistoric humans adapted to intense climate change
Released: 22-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Marine mollusc shells reveal how prehistoric humans adapted to intense climate change
Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona

Current global climatic warming is having, and will continue to have, widespread consequences for human history, in the same way that environmental fluctuations had significant consequences for human populations in the past.

Newswise: Discovery sheds light on why the Pacific islands were colonized
Released: 22-Apr-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Discovery sheds light on why the Pacific islands were colonized
Australian National University

The discovery of pottery from the ancient Lapita culture by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) has shed new light on how Papua New Guinea served as a launching pad for the colonisation of the Pacific – one of the greatest migrations in human history.

Released: 11-Apr-2022 4:20 PM EDT
Study sheds new light on the origin of civilisation
University of Warwick

New research from the University of Warwick, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Reichman University, Universitat Pompeu Fabra and the Barcelona School of Economics challenges the conventional theory that the transition from foraging to farming drove the development of complex, hierarchical societies by creating agricultural surplus in areas of fertile land.

Newswise: A population Hub out of Africa explains East Asian lineages in Europe 45.000 years ago
Released: 7-Apr-2022 1:00 PM EDT
A population Hub out of Africa explains East Asian lineages in Europe 45.000 years ago
Universita di Bologna

The ancient human remains unearthed in the Bacho Kiro cave (in present-day Bulgaria) and recently genetically described were surprisingly reported to be more closely related to contemporary East Asians than contemporary Europeans.

Released: 6-Apr-2022 12:55 PM EDT
Cross-College Researchers Unravel Mummy Bird Mystery
Cornell University

Over the last several months, a certain bird – believed to be a sacred ibis – has been drawing a lot of attention, and covering a lot of ground, at Cornell University.

Newswise: Migrants from south carrying maize were early Maya ancestors
Released: 23-Mar-2022 3:45 PM EDT
Migrants from south carrying maize were early Maya ancestors
University of New Mexico

New research published this week by University of New Mexico archaeologist Keith Prufer shows that a site in Belize was critical in studying the origins of the ancient Maya people and the spread of maize as a staple food.

Newswise: Preserving the past
Released: 22-Mar-2022 1:10 PM EDT
Preserving the past
Sandia National Laboratories

Christina Chavez, Sandia National Laboratories' first full-time archaeologist, works with teams throughout Sandia to ensure the U.S. Department of Energy remains in compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act.

Newswise: Study reconsiders name of Peru’s Machu Picchu
Released: 22-Mar-2022 11:25 AM EDT
Study reconsiders name of Peru’s Machu Picchu
University of Illinois Chicago

Findings suggest Incas had a different name for the site

Released: 21-Mar-2022 4:50 PM EDT
Leftovers in prehistoric pots let scientists peek into the kitchen of an ancient civilization
Frontiers

How to reconstruct the cookery of people who lived thousands of years ago? Bones and plant remains can tell us what kind of ingredients were available.

Released: 9-Mar-2022 9:00 AM EST
Hot Topics at Experimental Biology 2022 Meeting, April 2–5 in Philadelphia
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

EB, the annual meeting of five scientific societies, brings together thousands of scientists and 25 guest societies in one interdisciplinary community. Join us April 2–5 in Philadelphia for an exciting lineup of live, in-person scientific sessions.

Newswise: New Study Sheds Light on Early Human Hair Evolution
Released: 9-Mar-2022 8:05 AM EST
New Study Sheds Light on Early Human Hair Evolution
George Washington University

Researchers in the Primate Genomics Lab at the George Washington University examined what factors drive hair variation in a wild population of lemurs known as Indriidae. Specifically, the researchers aimed to assess the impacts of climate, body size and color vision on hair evolution.

Newswise: Archaeologists discover innovative 40,000-year-old culture in China
Released: 3-Mar-2022 2:05 AM EST
Archaeologists discover innovative 40,000-year-old culture in China
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

The discovery of a new culture suggests processes of innovation and cultural diversification occurring in Eastern Asia during a period of genetic and cultural hybridization.

Released: 28-Feb-2022 1:35 PM EST
Big Data Arrives on the Farm
Washington University in St. Louis

Digital technologies are beginning to make inroads into agriculture in lower-income countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America. Precision agriculture has the potential to remove farmers from the local circuits of information and create new dependencies on external commercial services, according to WashU expert Glenn Stone.

Newswise: New Genetic Analysis of Ancient Africans Creates a Clearer Picture of Life 50,000 Years Ago
18-Feb-2022 10:35 AM EST
New Genetic Analysis of Ancient Africans Creates a Clearer Picture of Life 50,000 Years Ago
Stony Brook University

Ancient DNA from the remains of nearly three dozen African foragers sheds new light on how groups across sub-Saharan Africa lived, traveled and settled prior to the spread of herding and farming. The study findings, to be published in Nature, produced the earliest DNA of humans on the continent.

Released: 16-Feb-2022 11:30 AM EST
‘Underground maps’ segment cities using fashion, AI
Cornell University

Cornell computer scientists have developed a new artificial intelligence framework to automatically draw “underground maps,” which accurately segment cities into areas with similar fashion sense and, thus, interests.

Newswise: Writing is not present in all
Released: 11-Feb-2022 2:05 PM EST
Writing is not present in all "complex" societies, but it can signal inequality
Field Museum

For more than a century written language was seen by anthropologists and other social scientists as a definitional feature of societal complexity or “advancement” (a term that is tinged with colonialism and racism).

Newswise: Identifying the portable toilets of the ancient Roman world
Released: 11-Feb-2022 1:05 PM EST
Identifying the portable toilets of the ancient Roman world
University of Cambridge

New research published today in the Journal of Archaeological Science Reports reveals how archaeologists can determine when a pot was used by Romans as a portable toilet, known as a chamber pot.

Newswise: First Modern Humans Arrived in Europe Earlier Than Previously Known
Released: 10-Feb-2022 11:10 AM EST
First Modern Humans Arrived in Europe Earlier Than Previously Known
Stony Brook University

Some 30 years of archeological and other types of scientific research around the ancient artifacts and human remains in the Grotte Mandrin, located in the Rhone River Valley in southern France, has revealed that humans may have arrived in Europe about 10,000 years earlier than originally thought.

Newswise: Climate drove 7,000 years of dietary changes in the Central Andes
Released: 9-Feb-2022 3:05 PM EST
Climate drove 7,000 years of dietary changes in the Central Andes
University of Utah

Identifying the factors that determine people’s diets is important to answer the bigger questions, such as how changing climates will influence unequal access to preferred foods. This study provides a blueprint to systematically untangle and evaluate the power of both climate and population size on the varied diets across a region in the past.

Newswise: Prehistoric human vertebra discovered in the Jordan Valley tells the story of prehistoric migration from Africa
Released: 2-Feb-2022 4:50 PM EST
Prehistoric human vertebra discovered in the Jordan Valley tells the story of prehistoric migration from Africa
Bar-Ilan University

A new study, led by researchers from Bar-Ilan University, Ono Academic College, The University of Tulsa, and the Israel Antiquities Authority, presents a 1.5 million-year-old human vertebra discovered in Israel's Jordan Valley.

Newswise: Researchers discover locations of ancient Maya sacred groves of cacao trees
Released: 31-Jan-2022 2:05 PM EST
Researchers discover locations of ancient Maya sacred groves of cacao trees
Brigham Young University

For as much as modern society worships chocolate, cacao — the plant chocolate comes from — was believed to be even more divine to ancient Mayas. The Maya considered cacao beans to be a gift from the gods and even used them as currency because of their value.

Newswise: Leafy greens first dished up 3,500 years ago
Released: 28-Jan-2022 1:25 PM EST
Leafy greens first dished up 3,500 years ago
Goethe University Frankfurt

Over 450 prehistoric pots were examined, 66 of them contained traces of lipids, that is, substances insoluble in water.

Newswise: Ice-age remains near Sea of Galilee show ancient residents thrived as ice melted
Released: 27-Jan-2022 5:30 PM EST
Ice-age remains near Sea of Galilee show ancient residents thrived as ice melted
Hebrew University of Jerusalem

A new article published today in PLOS ONE by a Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU)’s Institute of Archaeology team and colleagues focused on the remains of a previously submerged fisher-hunter-gatherer camp on the shores of the Sea of Galilee from around 23,000 years ago.

Newswise: Scientists decode 450 years of boom and crisis in Europe from ages of building timber
Released: 26-Jan-2022 4:05 PM EST
Scientists decode 450 years of boom and crisis in Europe from ages of building timber
Frontiers

Tracking building activity across the years, estimated from felling year of timber from historical buildings, can yield an unrivaled economic record for premodern Europe.

Released: 24-Jan-2022 3:00 PM EST
New Study: Meat May Not Have Made Us Human, After All
University at Albany, State University of New York

The importance of meat eating in human evolution is being challenged by a new study from a team of five paleoanthropologists that includes the University at Albany’s John Rowan.

Newswise: New Study Calls Into Question the Importance of Meat Eating in Shaping Our Evolution
20-Jan-2022 10:25 AM EST
New Study Calls Into Question the Importance of Meat Eating in Shaping Our Evolution
George Washington University

A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences calls into question the primacy of meat eating in early human evolution.

Newswise: The secrets of ancient Japanese tombs revealed thanks to satellite images
Released: 19-Jan-2022 4:55 PM EST
The secrets of ancient Japanese tombs revealed thanks to satellite images
Politecnico di Milano

A research group at the Politecnico di Milano analysed the orientation of ancient Japanese tombs – the so-called Kofun.

Released: 17-Jan-2022 8:00 AM EST
Making the invisible visible: tracing the origins of plants in West African cuisine
University of Bristol

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, in co-operation with colleagues from Goethe University, Frankfurt, has uncovered the first insights into the origins of West African plant-based cuisine, locked inside pottery fragments dating back some 3,500 years ago.

Newswise: Ancient Mesopotamian Discovery Transforms Knowledge of Early Farming
Released: 11-Jan-2022 2:05 PM EST
Ancient Mesopotamian Discovery Transforms Knowledge of Early Farming
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers researchers have unearthed the earliest definitive evidence of broomcorn millet in ancient Iraq, challenging our understanding of humanity’s earliest agricultural practices. Their findings appear in the journal Scientific Reports.

Newswise: Medieval warhorses were surprisingly small in stature, study shows
Released: 10-Jan-2022 5:35 PM EST
Medieval warhorses were surprisingly small in stature, study shows
University of Exeter

Medieval warhorses are often depicted as massive and powerful beasts, but in reality many were no more than pony-sized by modern standards, a new study shows.

Newswise: Rare African script offers clues to the evolution of writing
Released: 10-Jan-2022 2:25 PM EST
Rare African script offers clues to the evolution of writing
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

The world’s very first invention of writing took place over 5000 years ago in the Middle East, before it was reinvented in China and Central America.


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