Feature Channels: Archaeology and Anthropology

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Released: 25-Sep-2020 1:55 PM EDT
How do Americans view the virus? Anthropology professor examines attitudes of COVID
Northern Arizona University

In her ongoing research about Americans' responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, Northern Arizona University anthropology professor Lisa Hardy and her collaborators have talked to dozens of people.

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Released: 25-Sep-2020 11:15 AM EDT
New funerary and ritual behaviors of the Neolithic Iberian populations discovered
University of Seville

Experts from the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology of the University of Seville have just published a study in the prestigious journal PLOS ONE on an important archaeological find in the Cueva de la Dehesilla (Cádiz).

Released: 24-Sep-2020 2:10 PM EDT
Artifacts from upstate Indigenous towns digitized, repatriated
Cornell University

Unearthed, digitized and soon to be repatriated, artifacts from two Native American towns are beginning to share their rich stories online thanks to a collaborative project by anthropologists, librarians and Indigenous community members.

Released: 24-Sep-2020 1:05 PM EDT
How do Americans view the virus? Anthropology professor examines attitudes, perceptions of COVID-19
Northern Arizona University

In her latest study, Northern Arizona University professor Lisa Hardy looks at how Americans’ attitudes and responses have changed during the time of the pandemic and how to many people, the virus is not a biological agent but instead a malicious actor.

Newswise: New study first to define link between testosterone and fathers’ social roles outside the family
Released: 23-Sep-2020 4:35 PM EDT
New study first to define link between testosterone and fathers’ social roles outside the family
University of Notre Dame

Lee Gettler, associate professor of anthropology at Notre Dame, led a team that worked with the BaYaka and Bondongo societies in the Republic of the Congo.

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Released: 21-Sep-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Archaeology uncovers infectious disease spread - 4000 years ago
University of Otago

New bioarchaeology research from a University of Otago PhD candidate has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife.

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Released: 18-Sep-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Ancient human footprints in Saudi Arabia give glimpse of Arabian ecology 120000 years ago
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

Situated between Africa and Eurasia, the Arabian Peninsula is an important yet understudied region for understanding human evolution across the continents.

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Released: 18-Sep-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Raids and bloody rituals among ancient steppe nomads
University of Bern

Ancient historiographers described steppe nomads as violent people dedicated to warfare and plundering.

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Released: 17-Sep-2020 2:55 PM EDT
A 48,000 years old tooth that belonged to one of the last Neanderthals in Northern Italy
Universita di Bologna

A milk-tooth found in the vicinity of "Riparo del Broion" on the Berici Hills in the Veneto region bears evidence of one of the last Neanderthals in Italy.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 5:30 PM EDT
Vulnerable groups affected by public transit cuts amid pandemic
McGill University

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport agencies across North America have made significant adjustments to services, including cutting trip frequency in many areas while increasing it in others.

Released: 16-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Did our early ancestors boil their food in hot springs?
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Some of the oldest remains of early human ancestors have been unearthed in Olduvai Gorge, a rift valley setting in northern Tanzania where anthropologists have discovered fossils of hominids that existed 1.8 million years ago.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Study reveals impact of centuries of human activity in American tropics
University of East Anglia

The devastating effects of human activity on wildlife in the American tropics over the last 500 years are revealed in a new study published today.

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Released: 11-Sep-2020 5:40 PM EDT
Netflix - a zebra among horses: QUT researcher
Queensland University of Technology

Media studies expert Professor Amanda Lotz, from QUT’s Digital Media Research Centre, said there is a lot of misunderstanding about the world’s biggest internet-distributed video service.

Newswise: Ancient Earthquake May Have Caused Destruction of Canaanite Palace at Tel Kabri
Released: 11-Sep-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Ancient Earthquake May Have Caused Destruction of Canaanite Palace at Tel Kabri
George Washington University

A team of Israeli and American researchers has uncovered new evidence that an earthquake may have caused the destruction and abandonment of a flourishing Canaanite palatial site about 3,700 years ago.

Released: 10-Sep-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Colors evoke similar feelings around the world
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

People all over the world associate colors with emotions. In fact, people from different parts of the world often associate the same colors with the same emotions.

Newswise: High literacy rate among military in late biblical kingdom of Judah
4-Sep-2020 9:55 AM EDT
High literacy rate among military in late biblical kingdom of Judah
PLOS

The ability to read and write was more widespread than expected among the people of Judah in the late 7th century BCE, according to a study published September 9, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Arie Shaus of Tel Aviv University, Israel, and colleagues.

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Released: 8-Sep-2020 6:30 PM EDT
The oldest Neanderthal DNA of Central-Eastern Europe
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Around 100,000 years ago, the climate worsened abruptly and the environment of Central-Eastern Europe shifted from forested to open steppe/taiga habitat, promoting the dispersal of wooly mammoth, wooly rhino and other cold adapted species from the Arctic.

Released: 4-Sep-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Study looks at smoking in pre-colonization North America
University of Chicago

For the first time, researchers use a metabolomics approach to find more detailed information about how tobacco use and smoking practices changed after colonization in North America.

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Released: 4-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Drone survey reveals large earthwork at ancestral Wichita site in Kansas
Dartmouth College

A Dartmouth-led study using multisensor drones has revealed a large circular earthwork at what may be Etzanoa, an archaeological site near Wichita, Kansas.

Released: 3-Sep-2020 2:50 PM EDT
'Attack Helicopters' an online sub-culture to watch out for
Queensland University of Technology

While 'trolls' have been around almost as long as the Internet, 'Incels' are a more recent and distinctly different cyber sub-culture which warrants more study says a QUT researcher.

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Released: 3-Sep-2020 2:35 PM EDT
True size of prehistoric mega-shark finally revealed
Swansea University

A new study led by Swansea University and the University of Bristol has revealed the size of the legendary giant shark Megalodon, including fins that are as large as an adult human.

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Released: 3-Sep-2020 1:25 PM EDT
New mathematical method shows how climate change led to fall of ancient civilization
Rochester Institute of Technology

A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher developed a mathematical method that shows climate change likely caused the rise and fall of an ancient civilization.

Newswise: Radiocarbon dating and CT scans reveal Bronze Age tradition of keeping human remains
25-Aug-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Radiocarbon dating and CT scans reveal Bronze Age tradition of keeping human remains
University of Bristol

Using radiocarbon dating and CT scanning to study ancient bones, researchers have uncovered for the first time a Bronze Age tradition of retaining and curating human remains as relics over several generations.

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Released: 27-Aug-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Atlantic sturgeon in the king's pantry -- unique discovery in Baltic sea wreck from 1495
Lund University

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden can now reveal what the Danish King Hans had planned to offer when laying claim to the Swedish throne in 1495: a two-metre-long Atlantic sturgeon.

Released: 26-Aug-2020 4:25 PM EDT
Revised tree ring data confirms ancient Mediterranean dates
Cornell University

Sturt Manning is leading investigations into the timelines of ancient events, using tree ring data to refine the widely used radiocarbon dating method.

Released: 21-Aug-2020 3:35 PM EDT
Research links Southeast Asia megadrought to drying in Africa
University of Pennsylvania

Physical evidence found in caves in Laos helps tell a story about a connection between the end of the Green Sahara, when once heavily vegetated Northern Africa became a hyper-arid landscape, and a previously unknown megadrought that crippled Southeast Asia 4,000 to 5,000 years ago.

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Released: 21-Aug-2020 10:20 AM EDT
UCI and international institutions link Southeast Asia megadrought to drying in Africa
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., Aug. 21, 2020 – Physical evidence found in caves in Laos helps tell a story about a connection between the end of the Green Sahara – when once heavily vegetated Northern Africa became a hyper-arid landscape – and a previously unknown megadrought that crippled Southeast Asia 4,000 to 5,000 years ago. In a paper published today in Nature Communications, scientists at the University of California, Irvine, the University of Pennsylvania, William Paterson University of New Jersey and other international institutions explain how this major climate transformation led to a shift in human settlement patterns in Southeast Asia, which is now inhabited by more than 600 million people.

Newswise:Video Embedded mutations-may-have-saved-brown-howlers-from-yellow-fever-virus
VIDEO
Released: 12-Aug-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Mutations may have saved brown howlers from yellow fever virus
University of Utah

From 2007 to 2009, a yellow fever virus outbreak nearly decimated brown and black and gold howler monkey populations at El Parque El Piñalito in northeastern Argentina. A study found that in brown howlers, there were two mutations on immune genes that resulted in amino acid changes in the part of the protein that detects the disease.

Newswise: Anthropology professor finds evidence of wine, caffeine in 500-year-old pottery
Released: 11-Aug-2020 1:30 PM EDT
Anthropology professor finds evidence of wine, caffeine in 500-year-old pottery
Wichita State University

From suburbia to cities across the globe, caffeine and wine are often a source of collective comfort: the first for a morning pick-me-up, the latter to unwind. Now a Wichita State University professor has discovered evidence to suggest that even our ancient ancestors enjoyed these drinks.

4-Aug-2020 1:55 PM EDT
DNA from an ancient, unidentified ancestor was passed down to humans living today
PLOS

A new analysis of ancient genomes suggests that different branches of the human family tree interbred multiple times, and that some humans carry DNA from an archaic, unknown ancestor.

Newswise: Archaeological site in peril: accelerated bone deterioration over the last 70 years at famous Mesolithic peat bog site Ageröd
23-Jul-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Archaeological site in peril: accelerated bone deterioration over the last 70 years at famous Mesolithic peat bog site Ageröd
PLOS

Alarming results from a 2019 survey of well-known archaeological site Ageröd reveal drastic bone and organic matter deterioration since the site’s initial excavations in the 1940s, suggesting action is needed to preserve findings from Ageröd and similar sites, according to a study published July 29, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Adam Boethius from Lund University, Sweden, and colleagues.

Newswise: Leaving money on the table to stay in the game: New paper squares economic choice with evolutionary survival
Released: 27-Jul-2020 12:30 PM EDT
Leaving money on the table to stay in the game: New paper squares economic choice with evolutionary survival
Santa Fe Institute

Unlike businesses or governments, organisms can't go into evolutionary debt -- there is no borrowing one's way back from extinction. This can lead to seemingly irrational economic choices that suddenly make sense when viewed as a multiplicative, evolutionary process.

Newswise: ‘Selfish and Loveless’ Society in Uganda Really Is Not
Released: 27-Jul-2020 8:05 AM EDT
‘Selfish and Loveless’ Society in Uganda Really Is Not
Baylor University

A mountain people in Uganda — branded as selfish and loveless by an anthropologist half a century ago — really is not, according to a study led by a Baylor University anthropologist.

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Released: 23-Jul-2020 6:05 PM EDT
Reexamining the history of slavery through 23andMe African ancestry data
Cell Press

The effects of the forced deportation of over 10 million African people during the transatlantic slave trade remain entrenched in the DNA of people from North, Central, and South America as well as the Caribbean.

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Released: 23-Jul-2020 4:40 PM EDT
Neandertals may have had a lower threshold for pain
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

As several Neandertal genomes of high quality are now available researchers can identify genetic changes that were present in many or all Neandertals, investigate their physiological effects and look into their consequences when they occur in people today.

Released: 21-Jul-2020 8:20 AM EDT
DNA reveals 2,500-year-old Siberian warrior was a woman
Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT)

In 1988, archaeologists from the RAS Institute for the History of Material Culture discovered a unique Scythian burial mound dating from the seventh century B.C. In one of the coffins, they found what was long believed to be the mummified remains of a teenage warrior boy buried with his weapons. According to cutting-edge DNA analysi by researchers from the Historical Genetics Lab at MIPT, the body actually belongs to a female, confirming Herodotus’ 2,500-year-old accounts of the Amazons, previously considered mythical.

Released: 20-Jul-2020 7:35 PM EDT
Archaeologists use tooth enamel protein to show sex of human remains
University of California, Davis

A new method for estimating the biological sex of human remains based on reading protein sequences rather than DNA has been used to study an archaeological site in Northern California.

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Released: 16-Jul-2020 8:45 AM EDT
Breakthrough in studying ancient DNA from Doggerland that separates the UK from Europe
University of Warwick

Thousands of years ago the UK was physically joined to the rest of Europe through an area known as Doggerland. However, a marine inundation took place during the mid-holocene, separating the British landmass from the rest of Europe, which is now covered by the North Sea.

Released: 15-Jul-2020 5:10 PM EDT
Rewriting history: New evidence challenges Euro-centric narrative of early colonization
Washington University in St. Louis

New research from Washington University in St. Louis provides evidence that Indigenous people continued to live in southeastern U.S. and actively resist European influence for nearly 150 years after the arrival of Spanish explorers in the 1500s.

Released: 15-Jul-2020 1:25 PM EDT
Extinction Rebellion's activists more likely to be new to protesting, study shows
University of Exeter

Ten per cent of those who took part in the group's protests in April 2019 were first-time demonstrators, twice the proportion of "novices" at climate marches a decade before.

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Released: 15-Jul-2020 1:15 PM EDT
New chemical analyzes: What did Danes and Italians in the Middle Ages have in common?
University of Southern Denmark

In the 1600s, two private chapels were erected as family burial sites for two noble families. One in the town Svendborg in Denmark, the other in Montella, Italy.

Newswise: For Chimpanzees, Salt and Pepper Hair Not a Marker of Old Age
Released: 14-Jul-2020 2:50 PM EDT
For Chimpanzees, Salt and Pepper Hair Not a Marker of Old Age
George Washington University

A new study published in the journal PLOS ONE finds graying hair is not indicative of a chimpanzee’s age.

Released: 10-Jul-2020 11:25 AM EDT
Alaskan volcano linked to mysterious period with extreme climate in ancient Rome
University of Copenhagen

he cold, famine and unrest in ancient Rome and Egypt after the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 BCE has long been shrouded in mystery.

Newswise: Cave divers unlock mysteries of the earliest Americans
3-Jul-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Cave divers unlock mysteries of the earliest Americans
McMaster University

A team of underwater cave explorers in Mexico have made unprecedented archeological discoveries in some of the most inaccessible places on Earth that unlock key mysteries about the earliest inhabitants of the Western Hemisphere, according to international experts who have studied the sites.

Newswise: Ancient Maya Reservoirs Contained Toxic Pollution
Released: 29-Jun-2020 4:50 PM EDT
Ancient Maya Reservoirs Contained Toxic Pollution
University of Cincinnati

Mercury, algae made water undrinkable in heart of city

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Released: 26-Jun-2020 10:50 AM EDT
The millenial pre-colonial cultural inluence is evident in the Amazon forest
University of Helsinki

More than ten years ago, large geometric earthworks found in the southwestern parts of the Amazon, called geoglyphs, were reported in the global scientific news.

Newswise:Video Embedded dolphins-learn-in-similar-ways-to-great-apes
VIDEO
Released: 25-Jun-2020 1:35 PM EDT
Dolphins learn in similar ways to great apes
University of Zurich

Dolphins use unusual techniques to obtain food: One of them, called "shelling", is used by the dolphins in Shark Bay in Western Australia. Dolphins in this population trap fishes inside large empty gastropod shells.

Newswise: Uganda’s Ik are not Unbelievably Selfish and Mean
Released: 25-Jun-2020 6:00 AM EDT
Uganda’s Ik are not Unbelievably Selfish and Mean
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The Ik, a small ethnic group in Uganda, are not incredibly selfish and mean as portrayed in a 1972 book by a prominent anthropologist, according to a Rutgers-led study. Instead, the Ik are quite cooperative and generous with one another, and their culture features many traits that encourage generosity.

Released: 23-Jun-2020 2:05 PM EDT
Climate change and the rise of the Roman Empire and the fall of the Ptolemies
Yale University

The assassination of Julius Caesar on the Ides of March in 44 B.C.E. triggered a 17-year power struggle that ultimately ended the Roman Republic leading to the rise of the Roman Empire.


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