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Study shows orthostatic hypotension not associated with higher risk of adverse events among patients undergoing more intensive blood pressure treatment

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have found that orthostatic hypotension was not associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events, falls, or fainting among participants in The Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial. In a study published in the journal Hypertension, the scientists showed that hypertension treatment had no impact on the link between OH and cardiovascular outcomes or other adverse events.

Channels: Aging, All Journal News, Blood, Cardiovascular Health, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Pharmaceuticals, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
27-Jan-2020 12:30 PM EST
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Blood pressure drug linked to lower risk of gout

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

A new study led by physician-researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) reports that the antihypertensive drug amlodipine lowered long-term gout risk compared to two other drugs commonly prescribed to lower blood pressure. The findings are published in the Journal of Hypertension.

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Released:
27-Jan-2020 12:30 PM EST
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‘Jumping genes’ help stabilize DNA folding patterns

Washington University in St. Louis

The DNA molecule inside the nucleus of any human cell is more than six feet long. To fit into such a small space, it must fold into precise loops that also govern how genes are turned on or off. New research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that "jumping genes" play a surprising role in stabilizing the 3D folding patterns of the DNA molecule inside the cell’s nucleus.

Channels: All Journal News, Blood, Cell Biology, Genetics, National Institutes of Health (NIH),

Released:
24-Jan-2020 2:10 PM EST
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Embargo will expire:
28-Jan-2020 3:05 AM EST
Released to reporters:
23-Jan-2020 11:50 AM EST

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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST

Researchers Reverse HIV Latency, Important Scientific Step Toward Cure

University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Overcoming HIV latency – activating HIV in CD4+ T cells that lay dormant – is a needed step toward a cure. Scientists at UNC-Chapel Hill, Emory University, and Qura Therapeutics – a partnership between UNC and ViiV Healthcare – showed it’s possible to drive HIV out of latency in two animal models.

Channels: AIDS and HIV, Blood, Healthcare, Immunology, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), Nature (journal), All Journal News,

Released:
21-Jan-2020 11:10 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST

Blood Tests Can Predict Timing of Final Menstrual Period

Endocrine Society

Blood tests could replace menstrual periods as a gauge for when a women is nearing menopause, according to new research published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Channels: Blood, OBGYN, Women's Health, Staff Picks, All Journal News,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 9:00 AM EST
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Newswise: Vitamin C-B1-Steroid Combo Linked to Lower Septic Shock Mortality in Kids

Vitamin C-B1-Steroid Combo Linked to Lower Septic Shock Mortality in Kids

Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago

Treating septic shock in children with a combination of intravenous vitamin C, vitamin B1 and hydrocortisone (a commonly used steroid) is associated with lower mortality, according to a study from Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. This is the first pediatric study of the safe and relatively inexpensive treatment for septic shock, and the preliminary data supports the promising outcomes seen in adults. Findings were published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Channels: Blood, Children's Health, Healthcare, Infectious Diseases, All Journal News,

Released:
21-Jan-2020 12:55 PM EST
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Newswise: While Promoting Diseases Like Cancer, These Enzymes Also Cannibalize Each Other
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Jan-2020 3:00 PM EST

While Promoting Diseases Like Cancer, These Enzymes Also Cannibalize Each Other

Georgia Institute of Technology

In diseases like cancer, atherosclerosis, and sickle cell anemia, cathepsins promote their propagation. Drug trials to inhibit these enzymes have failed due to baffling side effects. Now a new study examines cathepsins in systems to remove some of the bafflement.

Channels: All Journal News, Grant Funded News, Blood, Cancer, Clinical Trials, Pharmaceuticals,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 10:05 AM EST
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Newswise: Scurvy is still a thing in Canada

Scurvy is still a thing in Canada

McMaster University

McMaster University researchers surveyed the data of patients of Hamilton’s two hospital systems over nine years and found 52 with low Vitamin C levels. This included 13 patients who could be diagnosed as having scurvy, and an additional 39 who tested positive for scurvy but did not have documented symptoms. Among those with scurvy, some were related to alcohol use disorder or to bariatric surgery but the majority were related to other causes of malnutrition such as persistent vomiting, purposeful dietary restrictions, mental illness, social isolation and dependence on others for food.

Channels: Alcohol and Alcoholism, Blood, Digestive Disorders, Mental Health, Surgery, Local - Canada, All Journal News,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 4:55 PM EST
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Newswise: JAMA editorial helps set record straight on unproven sepsis therapy
  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jan-2020 6:30 AM EST

JAMA editorial helps set record straight on unproven sepsis therapy

University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC)

The Jan. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) features an important study about sepsis with an accompanying editorial by a University of Nebraska Medical Center expert. The study and editorial sets the record straight on an unproven therapy some physicians use to treat sepsis, a deadly infectious disease. The editorial, written by Andre Kalil, M.D., M.P.H., professor of infectious diseases in the UNMC Department of Internal Medicine, writes in support of the new and rigorous international study based on a randomized clinical trial in Australia, published in the same issue. The editorial appears in the Jan. 17 online issue and also will appear in the Feb. 4 print edition.

Channels: Clinical Trials, Healthcare, Infectious Diseases, Pharmaceuticals, JAMA, All Journal News, Blood,

Released:
16-Jan-2020 11:50 PM EST
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