Feature Channels: Cell Biology

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Released: 19-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Without ‘work-life balance,’ this protein may promote disease
Ohio State University

A family of proteins that have a role in ensuring many types of cells move and maintain their shape may promote disease when they act like workaholics and disrupt the cellular environment, new research suggests.

Released: 16-May-2022 8:35 AM EDT
Factor Bioscience to Deliver Four Presentations at the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy (ASGCT) 25th Annual Meeting
Factor Bioscience

Factor Bioscience Inc., a Cambridge-based biotechnology company focused on developing mRNA and cell-engineering technologies, announced its participation in the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy (ASGCT) 25th Annual Meeting to be held in Washington, D.C. from May 16-19, 2022.

Newswise: Novel Cell Atlas for Multiple Human Tissues Reveals Discoveries Underlying Complex Diseases
12-May-2022 2:00 PM EDT
Novel Cell Atlas for Multiple Human Tissues Reveals Discoveries Underlying Complex Diseases
Massachusetts Eye and Ear

Scientists from the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have developed a first-of-its-kind cross-tissue cell atlas, and in collaboration with researchers at Mass Eye and Ear, have uncovered new clues for specific cell types and genes involved in complex diseases. In a new study published May 12 in Science, researchers described for the first time how their novel cross-tissue cell atlas derived from an analysis of nuclei from 25 frozen samples from 8 tissue types may increase understanding of the cellular and genetic underpinnings of complex diseases, including heart disease and cancers.

Newswise: Murray to preside over ASCB in 2024
Released: 12-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Murray to preside over ASCB in 2024
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

Sandra A. Murray was elected by members of the American Society for Cell Biology to serve as President in 2024. Murray is a Professor in the Department of Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh. She will serve as President-Elect on the Executive Committee in 2023.

Newswise: 'Nanobodies' from Llamas Could Yield Cell-Specific Medications for Humans
Released: 12-May-2022 9:30 AM EDT
'Nanobodies' from Llamas Could Yield Cell-Specific Medications for Humans
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In “proof of concept” experiments with mouse and human cells and tissues, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have designed tiny proteins, called nanobodies, derived from llama antibodies, that could potentially be used to deliver targeted medicines to human muscle cells.

Released: 11-May-2022 1:15 PM EDT
Scientists Detect Common Fungicide in Pregnant Women and Children
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

For the first time, UNC-Chapel Hill scientists have measured the concentration of a biomarker of the commonly used fungicide azoxystrobin in the urine of pregnant women and children. They also documented maternal transfer of the chemical to mouse embryos and weaning-age mice.

Newswise:Video Embedded life-after-death-for-the-human-eye-vision-scientists-revive-light-sensing-cells-in-organ-donor-eyes
VIDEO
9-May-2022 4:30 PM EDT
Life After Death For The Human Eye: Vision Scientists Revive Light-Sensing Cells in Organ Donor Eyes
University of Utah Health

Scientists have revived light-sensing neuron cells in organ donor eyes and restored communication between them as part of a series of discoveries that stand to transform brain and vision research.

Released: 11-May-2022 10:15 AM EDT
Experimental evolution illustrates gene bypass process for mitosis
Nagoya University

Researchers from Nagoya University demonstrated gene bypass events for mitosis using evolutionary repair experiments.

9-May-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Stress may be associated with fertility issues in women
Endocrine Society

Female rats exposed to a scream sound may have diminished ovarian reserve and reduced fertility, according to a small animal study published in the Endocrine Society’s journal, Endocrinology.

Released: 10-May-2022 8:05 AM EDT
ASTRO issues clinical guideline on radiation therapy for brain metastases
American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)

A new clinical guideline from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) provides guidance on the use of radiation therapy to treat patients with brain metastases from non-hematologic solid tumors. The guideline, which updates ASTRO’s original 2012 guideline to reflect recent research developments, is published in Practical Radiation Oncology.

Released: 9-May-2022 11:25 AM EDT
Drugs showing promise in cancer trials reduce scarring for scleroderma, study shows
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Epigenetic drugs that have shown promise in cancer trials significantly reduce scarring in the cells of patients with scleroderma, a new study shows. Results reveal that drugs that inhibit BRD4, known to play a role in cancer, also affect fibrosis in scleroderma. Researchers tested BRD4 inhibitors on the skin fibroblasts of scleroderma patients and in mouse models of skin fibrosis, finding that the treatment stopped scarring in both human-derived cells and in animals.

Newswise: Moffitt Researchers Identify Key Factors Impacting Adaptive Therapy
Released: 9-May-2022 11:25 AM EDT
Moffitt Researchers Identify Key Factors Impacting Adaptive Therapy
Moffitt Cancer Center

Researchers in the Center of Excellence for Evolutionary Therapy at Moffitt Cancer Center have been investigating an alternative treatment approach called adaptive therapy that focuses on maintaining disease control instead of complete tumor cell elimination. In a new study published in Communications Medicine, the researchers used mathematical modeling to reveal that the spatial organization of a tumor is an important factor that governs how cells compete with one another and the effectiveness of adaptive therapy.

Newswise: Study Finds Marker and Potential Treatment for Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Released: 9-May-2022 10:15 AM EDT
Study Finds Marker and Potential Treatment for Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

There is an urgent need for new and better treatments for the 3 million people who suffer from Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Since the causes of IBD remain unknown, most therapies are directed against inflammation, but a better understanding of the basic mechanisms will allow more meaningful treatment for patients. An in-depth, 10-year study of immune mechanisms by researchers at the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, however, may have both identified a marker of IBD as well as a potential treatment option.

Newswise: Model finds COVID-19 deaths among elderly may be due to genetic limit on cell division
Released: 9-May-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Model finds COVID-19 deaths among elderly may be due to genetic limit on cell division
University of Washington

According to a model created by University of Washington research professor James Anderson, a genetically predetermined limit on your immune system may be the key to why COVID-19 has such a devastating effect on the elderly.

Released: 4-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Benefits of Exercise May Vary Greatly in Primary Mitochondrial Disease
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

In a new study, researchers demonstrated that the benefits of endurance exercise can vary based on the type of mutation involved in mitochondrial disease, and while the benefits of exercise outweigh the risks, the mitochondrial genetic status of patients should be taken into consideration when recommending exercise as therapy.

Newswise: UAH collaboration creates self-learning AI platform to discover new drugs
Released: 4-May-2022 9:35 AM EDT
UAH collaboration creates self-learning AI platform to discover new drugs
University of Alabama Huntsville

A cross-college collaboration at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) has developed a self-learning artificial intelligence (AI) platform that uses big data analytics to discover how new pharmaceutical drugs and various molecules work inside living cells.

Released: 2-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Scientists create viable, reproducing yeast-cyanobacterial hybrids
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Every plant, animal or other nucleus-containing cell also harbors an array of miniature “organs” that perform essential functions for the cell.

Released: 28-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Rutgers Researcher Aims to Protect and Regenerate Corals Through Coral Genomics with $500K NSF Grant and Award-Winning Video
Rutgers University's Office for Research

A Rutgers researcher will use genomics, genetics, and cell biology to identify and understand the corals’ response to heat stress conditions and to pinpoint master regulatory genes involved in coral bleaching due to global warming and climate change. The researcher and his team will use a novel gene-editing tool as a resource to knock down some gene functions with the goal of boosting the corals’ abilities to survive.

27-Apr-2022 1:00 PM EDT
Researchers Share Insights about Mechanisms of Human Embryo and Create Method to Develop Transcriptionally Similar Cells in Tissue Culture
Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers share insights about the mechanisms of human embryo and create method to develop transcriptionally similar cells in tissue culture; latest discovery a step closer to finding alternative for bone marrow and other cancer treatments.

Released: 27-Apr-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Origin of complex cells started without oxygen
University of Exeter

The origin of complex cells started without oxygen, new research suggests.

Newswise: Burroughs Wellcome Fund awards additional funding to PAIR-UP network for Black imaging scientists
Released: 25-Apr-2022 9:15 AM EDT
Burroughs Wellcome Fund awards additional funding to PAIR-UP network for Black imaging scientists
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

PAIR-UP has received additional funding of $675,000 over three years from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund to include dedicated postdoctoral fellows to guide three of the five research teams, also known as Peer Imaging Clusters (PICs).

Released: 20-Apr-2022 11:35 AM EDT
Multiple treatments to slow age-related muscle wasting
University of Basel

Everyone wants to stay fit and healthy as they grow old.

Released: 19-Apr-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Portable, point-of-care COVID-19 test discerns alpha variant from earlier strains
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

A point-of-care COVID-19 test developed by researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign can now detect and differentiate the alpha variant of the SARS-CoV-2 virus from earlier strains in saliva samples.

Newswise: When neurons behave like a double-edged sword
Released: 19-Apr-2022 2:25 PM EDT
When neurons behave like a double-edged sword
Kyoto University

A new study reports that immune cell responses to bacteria affect the intrinsic excitability of rat neuronal subtypes differently.

Released: 19-Apr-2022 10:05 AM EDT
SLAS Technology April Issue Available Now
SLAS

The April issue of SLAS Technology is now available open access on ScienceDirect.

Newswise: 041422-ber-protein-functions_0.jpg?itok=gA7xQbpZ
Released: 15-Apr-2022 3:30 PM EDT
Machine Learning Helps Predict Protein Functions
Department of Energy, Office of Science

To engineer proteins for specific functions, scientists change a protein sequence and experimentally test how that change alters its function. Because there are too many possible amino acid sequence changes to test them all in the laboratory, researchers build computational models that predict protein function based on amino acid sequences. Scientists have now combined multiple machine learning approaches for building a simple predictive model that often works better than established, complex methods.

Newswise: Decoding a direct dialog between the gut microbiota and the brain
Released: 15-Apr-2022 10:35 AM EDT
Decoding a direct dialog between the gut microbiota and the brain
Institut Pasteur

Gut microbiota by-products circulate in the bloodstream, regulating host physiological processes including immunity, metabolism and brain functions.

Released: 15-Apr-2022 10:25 AM EDT
Rilzabrutinib for blood disorder shows promise in phase 1–2 clinical trial
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Drug may safely boost platelet levels in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

Newswise: Targeting “Cell Clustering” by Gene Deletion Reduces Drug Resistance
Released: 15-Apr-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Targeting “Cell Clustering” by Gene Deletion Reduces Drug Resistance
Stony Brook University

A recent study published in the journal Communications Biology shows manipulating and deleting a specific gene (AMN1) from yeast could provide a foundation for a new approach to combatting drug resistance when treating microbial infections or cancer.

Newswise: The Steak is the Limit
Released: 14-Apr-2022 5:05 PM EDT
The Steak is the Limit
American Technion Society

Israeli scientists have succeeded in creating edible muscle fibers by bioprinting a plant-based scaffold and living animal cells. By using non-animal-derived materials like pea protein, which is non-allergenic, the findings open new possibilities for future development of the cultivated meat market.

Newswise: Getting Under Our Skin
Released: 14-Apr-2022 12:30 PM EDT
Getting Under Our Skin
Harvard Medical School

Spatial maps of melanoma reveal how individual cells interact as cancer progresses

Newswise: Yale findings broaden the repertoire of cancer-relevant genes
Released: 14-Apr-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Yale findings broaden the repertoire of cancer-relevant genes
Yale Cancer Center

Following an analysis of over 12,000 human genes, research from Yale Cancer Center indicates there is cancer-relevant importance in a much larger proportion of human genes than current cancer research models suggest.

Released: 14-Apr-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Moffitt Researchers Identify Key Characteristics of Immune Cells in Ovarian Cancer
Moffitt Cancer Center

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center want to improve their understanding of the immune environment in ovarian cancer in hopes of making immunotherapy an option for these patients. In a new study published in Cancer Cell, they report on key characteristics of immune cells in ovarian cancer and identify cell types important for mediating an immune response.

Newswise: Vitamin E can boost immunotherapy responses by reinvigorating dendritic cells
Released: 14-Apr-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Vitamin E can boost immunotherapy responses by reinvigorating dendritic cells
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Using retrospective clinical data and in-depth lab studies, researchers have discovered that vitamin E can enhance immunotherapy responses by stimulating dendritic cells in the tumor.

Released: 12-Apr-2022 11:20 AM EDT
Researchers Working with Brewer’s and Baker’s Yeast Species Discover Yeast Self-Destruct Pathway
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

The findings suggest these single-celled organisms have programmed or regulated cell-death mechanisms like those that are known to work in animals and other complex organisms.

Released: 8-Apr-2022 1:35 PM EDT
Crowning a quest into a very well-guarded secret: Structure of the kinetochore corona finally revealed
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology

Cell division builds our bodies, supplying all cells in our tissues and organs, from the skin to the intestine, from the blood to the brain.

Released: 7-Apr-2022 10:05 AM EDT
LevitasBio Announces the LeviCell EOS System: A New Era in Sample Processing and Characterization
LevitasBio

LevitasBio, Inc. today unveiled the LeviCell™ EOS System, their next generation solution for cell separation and enrichment, featuring higher throughput and simultaneous targeted selection of viable cells.

Released: 5-Apr-2022 3:55 PM EDT
The latest news on clinical trials is here on Newswise
Newswise

Here are some of the latest articles that have been added to the Clinical Trials channel on Newswise.

Newswise: Using Gene Scissors to Specifically Eliminate Individual Cell Types
Released: 4-Apr-2022 2:05 AM EDT
Using Gene Scissors to Specifically Eliminate Individual Cell Types
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

With the help of the CRISPR/Cas molecular scissors, genetic information in a plant can be modified to make the latter more robust to pests, diseases, or extreme climatic conditions. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now developed this method further to eliminate the complete DNA of specific cell types and, thus, prevent their formation during plant development. This will also help to better understand development mechanisms in plants. The findings are presented in Nature Communications. (DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-29130-w)

Newswise: Hope Builds for New Therapeutics to Reverse or Prevent Alzheimer’s
25-Mar-2022 7:55 AM EDT
Hope Builds for New Therapeutics to Reverse or Prevent Alzheimer’s
American Physiological Society (APS)

A new study from the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson finds that (Aβ) accumulation in AD is associated with reduced blood flow to the brain, known as cerebral hypoperfusion.

Released: 1-Apr-2022 5:30 PM EDT
Higher blood fats more harmful than first thought
University of Leeds

Increased levels of blood fats in people with type 2 diabetes and obesity are more harmful than previously thought, a new study has found.

25-Mar-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Plant Compound Shows Promise for Alleviating Food Allergies
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Researchers combined advanced computational methods with experimental studies to gain new insight, at the cell level, into how the plant compound formononetin might be used to treat food allergies. With nearly 10% of the world population affected by food allergies — which are sometimes life-threatening — new treatments are critically needed.

Newswise: Scientists bioprint tissue-like constructs capable of controlled, complex shape change
Released: 31-Mar-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Scientists bioprint tissue-like constructs capable of controlled, complex shape change
University of Illinois Chicago

New cell-laden bioink, comprised of tightly-packed, flake-shaped microgels and living cells, enables the production of cell-rich 4D bioconstructs that can change shape under physiological conditions.

Newswise: Octopus-like tentacles help cancer cells invade the body
Released: 28-Mar-2022 5:45 PM EDT
Octopus-like tentacles help cancer cells invade the body
University of Copenhagen

With help from the best tweezers in the world a team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen has shed new light on a fundamental mechanism in all living cells that helps them explore their surroundings and even invade tissue.

Newswise: MBoC to offer authors an open access option
Released: 28-Mar-2022 10:30 AM EDT
MBoC to offer authors an open access option
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC) now offers authors the option of having their Article or Brief Report made open access immediately upon publication. The new option offers greater flexibility to authors, many of who are required by their funders to make their work open access.

Newswise: Once Called Cellular Debris, Tiny Bubbles May Play Key Role in Understanding, Treating Diseases
Released: 24-Mar-2022 4:40 PM EDT
Once Called Cellular Debris, Tiny Bubbles May Play Key Role in Understanding, Treating Diseases
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Scientists have long puzzled about a critical way that cells communicate with one another, but Rutgers researchers have used a simple roundworm to solve the mystery.

Released: 24-Mar-2022 9:00 AM EDT
MBoC introduces Preprint Highlights to recognize selected papers
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC) has begun publishing MBoC Preprint Highlights, a new type of editorial content that provides brief summaries and structured recognition of selected preprints. This effort leverages the expertise of MBoC and the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) to promote the curation of the preprint literature for the benefit of the scientific community.


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