Feature Channels: Cell Biology

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Released: 7-Aug-2020 2:25 PM EDT
Alcoholism treatment is potentially effective against COVID-19
National Research University - Higher School of Economics (HSE)

A team of chemists from HSE University and the Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry used molecular modelling to find out that two medications that have been known for a long time can be used to fight SARS-CoV-2.

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Released: 7-Aug-2020 1:45 PM EDT
Algal symbiosis could shed light on dark ocean
Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences

New research has revealed a surprise twist in the symbiotic relationship between a type of salamander and the alga that lives inside its eggs.

3-Aug-2020 5:00 PM EDT
Perfectly Balanced: The Yin and Yang of Inflammation Controlled By A Single Molecule
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Study Reveals A Molecular Mechanism That Helps The Body Mount Perfectly Balanced Responses to Deadly Infections

Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:40 PM EDT
Tip Sheet: COVID-19 vaccines, COVID-19 and cancer patients, smoking cessation apps, structural racism in medicine – and more
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Summaries of recent Fred Hutch research findings and other news with links for additional background and media contacts.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 4-Aug-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Within a month following a heart attack, people are at increased risk for a second one. As a result, physicians treat these patients with medications to rapidly reduce cardiovascular risk factors for another event. Although statins are designed to reduce the risk from one underlying problem, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or “bad” cholesterol, they often aren’t able drop it to recommended levels within 30 days. Now, testing a next-generation cholesterol-lowering drug known as a PCSK9 inhibitor, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers showed they could lower blood cholesterol to safer levels faster when it is added to traditional therapies.

Newswise: Inhibiting Enzyme Helps Cancer Immunotherapy Work Better
Released: 3-Aug-2020 3:25 PM EDT
Inhibiting Enzyme Helps Cancer Immunotherapy Work Better
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers discovered that people with an inactive RNA-editing enzyme respond better to cancer immunotherapy, and inhibitors of the enzyme help mice with difficult-to-treat cancers live longer.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 1:50 PM EDT
How a gooey slime helps bacteria survive
University of Tsukuba

Bacteria have the ability to adapt to their environment to survive the host's immune defense.

Released: 3-Aug-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Cell biology society awarded $1.3M NIH grant to enhance diversity in academic biomedical workforce
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) was awarded a first-of-its-kind National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant to enhance diversity in the academic biomedical workforce.

Released: 30-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Gut Microbiome Translates Stress Into Sickle Cell Crises
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

A new study shows how chronic psychological stress leads to painful vessel-clogging episodes—the most common complication of sickle-cell disease (SCD) and a frequent cause of hospitalizations. The findings, made in mice, show that the gut microbiome plays a key role in triggering those episodes and reveals possible ways to prevent them. The research was conducted by scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and published online today in Immunity.

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Released: 29-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
New insights into wound healing
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from a multidisciplinary team led by Washington University may provide new insights into wound healing, scarring and how cancer spreads.

Newswise: UAH collaboration with HudsonAlpha
expands knowledge of how our cells work
28-Jul-2020 4:10 PM EDT
UAH collaboration with HudsonAlpha expands knowledge of how our cells work
University of Alabama Huntsville

In an effort to better understand how our cells work, scientists have studied the function of 208 proteins responsible for orchestrating the regulation genes in the human genome. A paper appearing in the journal "Nature" describes the collaborative effort.

Released: 28-Jul-2020 5:20 PM EDT
Solving a DNA mystery
University of California, Santa Barbara

"A watched pot never boils," as the saying goes, but that was not the case for UC Santa Barbara researchers watching a "pot" of liquids formed from DNA. In fact, the opposite happened.

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Released: 28-Jul-2020 3:15 PM EDT
How the zebrafish got its stripes
University of Bath

Animal patterns - the stripes, spots and rosettes seen in the wild - are a source of endless fascination, and now researchers at the University Bath have developed a robust mathematical model to explain how one important species, the zebrafish, develops its stripes.

Newswise: The big gulp: Inside-out protection of parasitic worms against host defenses
23-Jul-2020 10:55 AM EDT
The big gulp: Inside-out protection of parasitic worms against host defenses
Morgridge Institute for Research

A team of developmental biologists at the Morgridge Institute for Research has discovered a means by which schistosomes, parasitic worms that infect more than 200 million people in tropical climates, are able to outfox the host’s immune system.

23-Jul-2020 10:30 AM EDT
Brain Cell Types Identified That May Push Males to Fight and Have Sex
NYU Langone Health

Two groups of nerve cells may serve as “on-off switches” for male mating and aggression, suggests a new study in rodents.

Newswise: Novel label-free imaging technique brings out the inner light within T cells
24-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
Novel label-free imaging technique brings out the inner light within T cells
Morgridge Institute for Research

A new imaging method developed by the Skala lab uses the natural autofluorescence within cells to assess T cell activity. The technique could help assess T cell involvement in immunotherapies.

Released: 24-Jul-2020 1:50 PM EDT
Another mRNA-based vaccine candidate protects animals against SARS-CoV-2
Cell Press

An experimental messenger RNA (mRNA)-based vaccine against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) elicits protective immune responses in mice and non-human primates, researchers report on July 23rd in the journal Cell.

Released: 23-Jul-2020 5:10 PM EDT
Mammal cells could struggle to fight space germs
University of Exeter

The immune systems of mammals - including humans - might struggle to detect and respond to germs from other planets, new research suggests.

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Released: 23-Jul-2020 3:50 PM EDT
FSU biologists shed light on how cells move resources
Florida State University

Florida State University researchers have new insight into the tiny packages that cells use to move molecules, a structure that is key to cellular metabolism, drug delivery and more.

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Released: 21-Jul-2020 8:10 PM EDT
Mutant zebrafish reveals a turning point in spine's evolution
Duke University

A chance mutation that led to spinal defects in a zebrafish has opened a little window into our own fishy past.

Released: 20-Jul-2020 10:35 AM EDT
New Research Reveals Antifungal Symbiotic Peptide In Legume
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Danforth Center scientists, Dilip Shah, PhD, Siva Velivelli, PhD, Kirk Czymmek, PhD, and their collaborators at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have identified a sub class of peptides in the nodules of the legume, Medicago truncatula that proved effective in inhibiting growth of the fungus causing gray mold.

Released: 16-Jul-2020 4:20 PM EDT
Blood iron levels could be key to slowing ageing, gene study shows
University of Edinburgh

Genes linked to ageing that could help explain why some people age at different rates to others have been identified by scientists.

Released: 16-Jul-2020 12:35 PM EDT
Self-Eating Decisions
Harvard Medical School

Researchers systematically surveyed the entire protein landscape of normal and nutrient-deprived cells to identify which proteins and organelles are degraded by autophagy, to shed light on the question of how cells decide what to recycle when they are starving.

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Released: 15-Jul-2020 3:45 PM EDT
Scientists discover way to stop spread of devastating childhood cancer
University of East Anglia

Researchers at the University of East Anglia and University of Manchester have made an important breakthrough that could lead to 'kinder' treatments for children with bone cancer, and save lives.

Newswise: Annual cell bio meeting moves online
Released: 15-Jul-2020 12:10 PM EDT
Annual cell bio meeting moves online
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

After careful consideration, the ASCB Council unanimously voted to cancel the in-person meeting scheduled to be held in Philadelphia in December and instead hold Cell Bio Virtual 2020-An Online ASCB|EMBO Meeting.

Newswise: Public Engagement grant awardees bring science to diverse groups
Released: 14-Jul-2020 10:05 AM EDT
Public Engagement grant awardees bring science to diverse groups
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The seven winners of the American Society for Cell Biology’s 2020 Public Engagement Grant Awards have created programs that share the wonder of science with vulnerable populations, such as people experiencing homelessness, the incarcerated, or refugees.

Newswise: Human Sperm Stem Cells Grown in Lab, an Early Step Toward Infertility Treatment
9-Jul-2020 1:55 PM EDT
Human Sperm Stem Cells Grown in Lab, an Early Step Toward Infertility Treatment
University of California San Diego Health

By inhibiting the molecule AKT, UC San Diego researchers favor the culture of human spermatogonial stem cells in the lab, a first step toward lab-produced sperm as a treatment for male infertility.

Released: 13-Jul-2020 12:25 PM EDT
Scientists discover key element of strong antibody response to COVID-19
Scripps Research Institute

A team led by scientists at Scripps Research has discovered a common molecular feature found in many of the human antibodies that neutralize SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Meet baker’s yeast, the budding, single-celled fungus that fluffs your bread
Released: 9-Jul-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Meet baker’s yeast, the budding, single-celled fungus that fluffs your bread
University at Buffalo

What IS baker's yeast? What does yeast do in nature? And why do scientists use it so much in the lab? University at Buffalo biologists chat about these questions.

Released: 9-Jul-2020 12:45 PM EDT
Structural analysis of COVID-19 spike protein provides insight into its evolution
Francis Crick Institute

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have characterised the structure of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein as well as its most similar relative in a bat coronavirus.

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Released: 9-Jul-2020 11:50 AM EDT
Researcher reconstructs skull of two million year-old giant dormouse
University of York

A PhD student has produced the first digital reconstruction of the skull of a gigantic dormouse, which roamed the island of Sicily around two million years ago.

Newswise:Video Embedded breast-cancer-cells-turn-killer-immune-cells-into-allies
VIDEO
6-Jul-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Breast Cancer Cells Turn Killer Immune Cells Into Allies
The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered that breast cancer cells can alter the function of immune cells known as Natural killer (NK) cells so that instead of killing the cancer cells, they facilitate their spread to other parts of the body. The study, which will be published July 9 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that preventing this reprogramming might stop breast cancer from metastasizing to other tissues, a major cause of death in breast cancer patients.

Newswise: Breast Cancer Cells Can Reprogram Immune Cells to Assist in Metastasis
9-Jul-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Breast Cancer Cells Can Reprogram Immune Cells to Assist in Metastasis
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center investigators report they have uncovered a new mechanism by which invasive breast cancer cells evade the immune system to metastasize, or spread, to other areas of the body. They propose that therapies targeting this process could be developed to halt or prevent metastasis and reduce breast cancer deaths.

Released: 7-Jul-2020 12:55 PM EDT
Women's egg quality dependent on metabolic factors
University of Queensland

In the world's most in-depth study of the final steps of egg maturation, the quality of a woman's eggs was found to be significantly dependent on the important metabolic coenzyme called nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+).

Released: 6-Jul-2020 5:05 PM EDT
European ancestry plays role in 'killer' honey bees' aggressiveness
York University

What causes African hybrid honey bees (AHB), also known as killer bees, to be highly defensive and aggressive? York University researchers have found it was the mixing of African and European genetics that led to hyper-aggression in this invasive strain of honey bees.

Newswise: Study pinpoints new function for histones
Released: 2-Jul-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Study pinpoints new function for histones
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Scientists discovered that histones act as an enzyme that converts copper into a form that can be used by the cells. The finding refutes earlier theories that copper spontaneously converts in the body into a usable state.

Newswise: Louis Justement and Mary-Ann Bjornsti begin leadership roles at FASEB
Released: 1-Jul-2020 2:50 PM EDT
Louis Justement and Mary-Ann Bjornsti begin leadership roles at FASEB
University of Alabama at Birmingham

Immunologist Louis Justement, Ph.D., begins his term as president of the largest coalition of biological and biomedical research associations in the United States, FASEB.

Newswise: New Drug Reduces Stroke Damage in Mice
29-Jun-2020 12:35 PM EDT
New Drug Reduces Stroke Damage in Mice
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Mice that received an injection of a new experimental drug, TAT-DP-2, after a stroke had smaller areas of damage, and their long-term neurological function was better than that of untreated animals.

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Released: 1-Jul-2020 1:10 PM EDT
Cancer cells make blood vessels drug resistant during chemotherapy
Hokkaido University

Scientists at Hokkaido University and collaborators have identified how inflammatory changes in tumors caused by chemotherapy trigger blood vessel anomalies and thus drug-resistance, resulting in poor prognosis of cancer patients.

Newswise: Which Came First? An Experiment in Recreating Primordial Proteins Solves a Long-standing Riddle
Released: 30-Jun-2020 2:40 PM EDT
Which Came First? An Experiment in Recreating Primordial Proteins Solves a Long-standing Riddle
Weizmann Institute of Science

How did the earliest proteins arise, given that the amino acids needed to make them are themselves produced by other proteins – enzymes? The Weizmann Institute's Prof. Dan Tawfik and colleagues recreated primordial proteins to find the answer.

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Released: 30-Jun-2020 12:15 PM EDT
New evidence for how blood clots may form in very ill COVID-19 patients
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Scientists have new evidence that overactive neutrophils--a common type of circulating immune cell--may drive the life-threatening blood clots and inflammation that occur in some patients with COVID-19.

Newswise:Video Embedded cancer-docs-join-fight-against-covid-live-event-for-june-25-3pm-edt
VIDEO
Released: 26-Jun-2020 8:50 AM EDT
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: Cancer Docs Join Fight Against COVID: Live Event for June 25, 3PM EDT
Newswise

Cancer researchers are turning their talents to the fight against COVID, using strategies that have lead to breakthroughs in cancer therapies for years, such as precision medicine, immunotherapy, biomarkers, and more.

Newswise: One-Time Treatment Generates New Neurons, Eliminates Parkinson’s Disease in Mice
18-Jun-2020 4:25 PM EDT
One-Time Treatment Generates New Neurons, Eliminates Parkinson’s Disease in Mice
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers have discovered that a single treatment to inhibit a gene called PTB in mice converts native astrocytes, brain support cells, into neurons that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. As a result, the mice’s Parkinson’s disease symptoms disappear.

Released: 24-Jun-2020 9:50 AM EDT
Neurons thrive even when malnourished
Cornell University

When animal, insect or human embryos grow in a malnourished environment, their developing nervous systems get first pick of any available nutrients so that new neurons can be made.

Newswise: Immune Cells Infiltrating Tumors May Play Bigger Cancer Role Than Previously Thought
Released: 22-Jun-2020 3:15 PM EDT
Immune Cells Infiltrating Tumors May Play Bigger Cancer Role Than Previously Thought
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers uncovered in mice how IRE1α, a molecule involved in cells’ response to stress, determines whether macrophages promote inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Inflammation is known to promote tumor growth, making IRE1α an attractive target for drug development.

Newswise: Researchers Say Genetics May Determine Wound Infection and Healing
Released: 22-Jun-2020 11:05 AM EDT
Researchers Say Genetics May Determine Wound Infection and Healing
Texas Tech University

In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers have determined that genetics may play a role in how wounds heal. Caleb Phillips, an assistant professor at Texas Tech University and director of the Phillips Laboratory in the Department of Biological Sciences, and doctoral student Craig Tipton led the study, “Patient genetics is linked to chronic wound microbiome composition and healing,” published Thursday (June 18) in the open-access, peer-reviewed medical journal PLOS Pathogens.

Released: 22-Jun-2020 8:55 AM EDT
Nuclear Softening Allows Cells to Move Into Dense Tissue, Encouraging Injury Repair
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Using an enzyme inhibitor in meniscus cells, a Penn team was able to soften their nucleus and promote access to previously impassible areas

Newswise: July’s SLAS Discovery Special Issue Now Available
Released: 22-Jun-2020 6:05 AM EDT
July’s SLAS Discovery Special Issue Now Available
SLAS

The July special issue of SLAS Discovery, “Functional Genomics for Target Identification,” features ten articles focused on three strategic pillars that form the foundation of the functional genomics discipline.

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Released: 19-Jun-2020 12:25 PM EDT
New research shows tiny, decoy 'sponges' attract coronavirus away from lung cells
Boston University

Imagine if scientists could stop the coronavirus infection in its tracks simply by diverting its attention away from living lung cells?


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