Feature Channels: Cell Biology

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Newswise: NIH first to develop 3D structure of twinkle protein
Released: 5-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
NIH first to develop 3D structure of twinkle protein
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)

Researchers from the National Institutes of Health have developed a three-dimensional structure that allows them to see how and where disease mutations on the twinkle protein can lead to mitochondrial diseases. The protein is involved in helping cells use energy our bodies convert from food. Prior to the development of this 3D structure, researchers only had models and were unable to determine how these mutations contribute to disease. Mitochondrial diseases are a group of inherited conditions that affect 1 in 5,000 people and have very few treatments.

Newswise: srikanthFluoroDOTrecord.jpg
Released: 5-Aug-2022 12:55 PM EDT
‘Simple yet powerful’: Seeing cell secretion like never before
Washington University in St. Louis

Washington University in St. Louis researchers have developed a novel method for visualizing the proteins secreted by cells with stunning resolution, making it the James Webb version for visualizing single cell protein secretion.

Newswise: Giant Viruses Build a Cell Nucleus Surprisingly Like Our Own
Released: 3-Aug-2022 2:30 PM EDT
Giant Viruses Build a Cell Nucleus Surprisingly Like Our Own
University of California San Diego

Scientists are using new technologies to obtain unprecedented looks inside viruses and their unique abilities to infect and destroy bacteria. Using cryo-EM and other technologies, they found that jumbo phage cells feature a compartment that is surprisingly similar to the nucleus of human cells.

Released: 3-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Mechanism of bacterial toxins in deadly attacks
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology

Only one thousandth of a milligram of the bacterial botulinum toxin is necessary to kill a living organism.

Newswise: Rensselaer Researchers Receive $350k Grant To Explore Cellular Mechanisms Linked to Cancer
Released: 3-Aug-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Rensselaer Researchers Receive $350k Grant To Explore Cellular Mechanisms Linked to Cancer
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute’s Scott Forth, assistant professor of biological sciences, and Peter Kramer, professor of mathematical sciences, have received a $359,572 grant  from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop a better understanding of a cellular process that, when errors occur, is linked to cancer.

Released: 2-Aug-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Enzyme, proteins work together to tidy up tail ends of DNA in dividing cells
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin–Madison have described the way an enzyme and proteins interact to maintain the protective caps, called telomeres, at the end of chromosomes, a new insight into how a human cell preserves the integrity of its DNA through repeated cell division. DNA replication is essential for perpetuating life as we know it, but many of the complexities of the process — how myriad biomolecules get where they need to go and interact over a series of intricately orchestrated steps — remain mysterious.

Newswise: Paintings, Cartoons Combine to Render Biological Molecules
26-Jul-2022 2:40 PM EDT
Paintings, Cartoons Combine to Render Biological Molecules
American Crystallographic Association (ACA)

During the annual ACA meeting, David Goodsell, of Scripps Research and RCSB Protein Data Bank, will discuss his use of artistic methods to visualize biological data. His presentation, "Art as a Tool for Structural Biology," takes place Tuesday. Traditional artistic mediums, like painting, provide the freedom necessary to illustrate cells, and Goodsell is using illustrations to lay the foundation for computational modeling of whole cells. He also creates brightly colored, cartoonlike graphics with nonphotorealistic computer graphics methods to highlight the overall shape of molecules and how they assemble and interact.

Released: 2-Aug-2022 2:25 PM EDT
Manipulating chromosomes in living cells reveals that they are fluid
CNRS (Centre National de Recherche Scientifique / National Center of Scientific Research)

For the first time, scientists from CNRS, Institut Curie and Sorbonne Université have been able to act physically on chromosomes in living cells.

Released: 2-Aug-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Feeling the pressure
Nara Institute of Science and Technology

Scientists from Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) have used elastic shell theory to describe how the stiffness of plant cell walls depends on their elasticity and internal turgor pressure.

Released: 29-Jul-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Don't give up the fight. Read the latest news about drug and antibiotic resistance
Newswise

Here are some of the latest articles that have been added to the Drug Resistance channel on Newswise, a free source for journalists.

Newswise: A new study gives an important understanding of how molecular motor proteins are involved in malaria transmission
Released: 28-Jul-2022 3:45 PM EDT
A new study gives an important understanding of how molecular motor proteins are involved in malaria transmission
University of Nottingham

Scientists at the University of Nottingham have made a major breakthrough in understanding how malaria parasites divide and transmit the disease, which could be a major step forwards in helping to prevent one of the biggest killer infections in the world.

   
Newswise: One-two punch: Researchers discover sophisticated mechanism that bacteria use to resist antibiotics
26-Jul-2022 4:15 PM EDT
One-two punch: Researchers discover sophisticated mechanism that bacteria use to resist antibiotics
McMaster University

Researchers at Canada's McMaster University have discovered a significant and previously unknown mechanism that many bacteria use to resist antibiotics.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 5:45 PM EDT
专家提醒:骨癌质子束治疗可保护周围组织
Mayo Clinic

七月是肉瘤宣传月,旨在引起人们对这种疾病的关注,肉瘤是一系列起源于身体骨骼或软组织的癌症。肉瘤有70多种类型,包括骨癌。骨癌的治疗方法包括针对癌症的手术、化疗、放疗或质子束治疗。

Released: 25-Jul-2022 5:40 PM EDT
تأكيد من طبيب أخصائي: العلاج الإشعاعي بحزم البروتونات لسرطان العظام يحافظ على الأنسجة المحيطة
Mayo Clinic

مدينة روتشستر، ولاية مينيسوتا: يعد تموز/يوليو هو شهر التوعية بالساركوما وللفت الانتباه لمجموعة من السرطانات التي تبدأ في العظام أو الأنسجة الرخوة في الجسم. هناك أكثر من 70 نوعاً من الساركوما، منها سرطان العظام. وتشمل طرق علاج سرطان العظام الجراحة والعلاج الكيميائي والعلاج الإشعاعي والعلاج الإشعاعي بحزم البروتونات الذي يستهدف الخلايا السرطانية.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 3:20 PM EDT
Researchers Identify Protein Connected to Aging and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis
Boston University School of Medicine

Findings provide the foundation for future therapeutic strategies by promoting repair of the pulmonary vascular system.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Coronavirus Spike Protein Activated Natural Immune Response, Damaged Heart Muscle Cells
American Heart Association (AHA)

Heart damage is common among patients hospitalized with COVID-19, leading many to wonder how the virus affects the heart. Now, researchers have found that the spike protein from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus can lead to heart muscle injury through the inflammatory process, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Scientific Sessions 2022.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 2:05 PM EDT
KSL Biomedical, Inc. to Exhibit at AACC Annual Scientific Meeting + Clinical Lab Expo
2022 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting Press Program

The premier global laboratory medicine exposition to be held at the McCormick Place Convention Center in Chicago, July 24-28, 2022.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 2:00 PM EDT
Advertencia Del Experto: Terapia Con Haz De Protones Para CáNcer De Hueso Salva Al Tejido Circundante
Mayo Clinic

Julio es el mes para concienciar sobre el sarcoma y llamar la atención sobre aquel grupo de cánceres que empiezan en los huesos o en los tejidos blandos del cuerpo. Hay más de 70 tipos de sarcoma, entre ellos, el cáncer de hueso.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 2:00 PM EDT
Alerta Do Especialista: Terapia Por Feixe De PróTons Para CâNcer óSseo Poupa Tecido Circundante
Mayo Clinic

Julho é o Mês da Conscientização do Sarcoma, chamando a atenção para um grupo de cânceres que começa nos ossos ou nos tecidos moles do corpo. Existem mais de 70 tipos de sarcoma, incluindo o câncer ósseo.

Newswise: Lumiradx to Present on Impact of Its Next-Generation Microfluidic Technology at American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Conference in Chicago
Released: 25-Jul-2022 12:30 PM EDT
Lumiradx to Present on Impact of Its Next-Generation Microfluidic Technology at American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Conference in Chicago
2022 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting Press Program

LumiraDx, a next-generation point of care diagnostics company will be hosting an industry workshop at this week’s American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Conference in Chicago. The workshop, held on July 27th, will include data-backed insights on the impact of LumiraDx’s advanced microfluidic technology over lateral flow point-of-care antigen tests, and the role of these rapid immunoassays in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

   
Released: 25-Jul-2022 12:25 PM EDT
DNA Recombinations Are Widespread in Human Genomes and Are Implicated in Both Development and Disease
RIKEN

Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences in Japan in collaboration with other researchers from around the world have discovered that recombinations of specific genomic sequences that are repeated millions of times in the genome of each of our cells are pervasively found in both normal and in disease states. Identifying the mechanisms that lead to this myriad of recombinations involving DNA sequences that were once considered as “junk”, may be crucial to understanding how our cells develop and what can make them unhealthy.

Newswise:Video Embedded cytovale-reveals-10-minute-510-k-pending-cytovale-system-and-intellisep-test-for-sepsis-at-aacc-2022
VIDEO
Released: 25-Jul-2022 10:40 AM EDT
Cytovale Reveals 10-Minute, 510(K) Pending Cytovale System and Intellisep Test for Sepsis at AACC 2022
2022 AACC Annual Scientific Meeting Press Program

Cytovale®, a medical diagnostics company focused on providing rapid and insightful tools to improve early detection of fast-moving and immune-mediated diseases, will reveal its 510(k) pending Cytovale system and 10-minute IntelliSep® sepsis risk stratification test at the American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) annual meeting, where new data featuring the test will also be shared. The instrument can be seen in the Cytovale booth, no. 5045, in the exhibit hall during Clinical Lab Expo hours. The IntelliSep test was recently named an AACC Disruptive Technology Award Semifinalist and is also being featured in the Disruptive Tech area of the exhibit hall during the meeting.

Released: 25-Jul-2022 10:15 AM EDT
Mayo Clinic Researchers Pinpoint Genetic Variations That Might Sway Course of COVID-19
Mayo Clinic

Researchers at Mayo Clinic's Center for Individualized Medicine have discovered key human genomic signatures that could help explain why COVID-19 is severe in some people and mild in others. After analyzing volumes of diverse worldwide DNA sequence data, the scientists identified mutations in two human proteins that might sway the course of SARS-CoV-2 — the virus responsible for COVID-19.

Released: 22-Jul-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Genetic defect leads to motor disorders in flies
University of Bonn

In their study, the research groups looked at a protein called Creld. A study from Bonn had recently been able to demonstrate that Creld plays an important role in the development of the heart in mammals.

Newswise: A Novel COVID-19 Vaccine Using Modified Bacterial DNA
20-Jul-2022 2:05 PM EDT
A Novel COVID-19 Vaccine Using Modified Bacterial DNA
UC San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers describe a different way to build a COVID-19 vaccine, one that would, in theory, remain effective against new and emerging variants and could be taken as a pill, by inhalation or other delivery methods.

Released: 21-Jul-2022 12:00 PM EDT
Generation of cardiomyocytes from human induced pluripotent stem cells resembling atrial cells with ability to respond to adrenoceptor agonists
Preprints

Faizzan S. Ahmad, Yongcheng Jin, Alexander D. Grassam-Rowe, Yafei Zhou, Meng Yuan, Xuehui Fan, Rui Zhou, Razik Mu-U-Min, Christopher O'Shea, Ayman M. Ibrahim, Wajiha Hyder, Yasmine Aguib, Magdi Yacoub, Davor Pavlovic

Newswise:Video Embedded cells-know-their-math
VIDEO
Released: 21-Jul-2022 12:05 AM EDT
Cells Know Their Math
Kyoto University

A mathematical model that successfully reproduces cellular patterns observed in sensory body tissue has been developed based on intensities of adhesion molecules as input parameters. A new numerical method for obtaining the solution of the model that can correctly handle complex cellular rearrangements preserves individual cell volumes and cell connectivity.

Released: 19-Jul-2022 4:50 PM EDT
Individual Cells Are Smarter Than Thought
University of Zurich

Individual humans make decisions all the time. These decisions often involve integrating a variety of contextual cues to ensure a decision is made that is adequate to the circumstances.

Released: 19-Jul-2022 12:55 PM EDT
Rutgers Scientists Reveal New Evidence of Key Mechanism in Alzheimer’s
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers scientists have found more clear-cut evidence of how the destructive proteins linked to Alzheimer’s disease attack human brain cells and destroy surrounding tissue.

   
Released: 19-Jul-2022 2:05 AM EDT
Study reveals how novel coronavirus manipulates cells to replicate
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

An article published in the journal Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology reports a study by researchers at the State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) and the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil showing how a human protein interacts with a SARS-CoV-2 protein, and describing one of the ways the virus that causes COVID-19 recruits cells to replicate.

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Released: 18-Jul-2022 1:45 PM EDT
How a Protein Breaks Free to Cause Deadly Cancers
University of California, Irvine

Better treatments for some of cancer’s deadliest forms could be closer due to a University of California, Irvine-led discovery about how a certain protein is activated in tumor cells. The finding, spearheaded by researchers with the School of Biological Sciences, could eventually lead to possible therapies for the especially dangerous melanoma and pancreatic adenocarcinoma, as well as the most common type of childhood brain cancer and adult skin cancer.

Newswise: Wistar Scientists Reveal New Function of Enzyme ADAR1 Linking it to Age-Related Diseases via a Role Independent of RNA-editing During Aging
18-Jul-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Wistar Scientists Reveal New Function of Enzyme ADAR1 Linking it to Age-Related Diseases via a Role Independent of RNA-editing During Aging
Wistar Institute

Published today in Nature Cell Biology, Wistar scientists revealed a novel ADAR1-SIRT1-p16INK4a axis in regulating cellular senescence and its potential implications in tissue aging.

Newswise: Diagnosis of Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease Now Possible with New Method Developed
Released: 15-Jul-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Diagnosis of Early-Stage Parkinson's Disease Now Possible with New Method Developed
Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Parkinson's is a progressive and debilitating disease of the brain that eventually compromises patients' ability to walk and even to talk. Its diagnosis is complex, and in the early stages – impossible.

Newswise: What the Mechanical Forces Behind Protein Folding Can Tell Us About Metastatic Cancer
13-Jul-2022 2:00 PM EDT
What the Mechanical Forces Behind Protein Folding Can Tell Us About Metastatic Cancer
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Cells communicate with themselves and their cellular environment through mechanical bonds. This work advances understanding of the role of these forces on proteins as they interact to accomplish their biological functions, including the control of cancer.

Newswise: Protein Parts Must Indeed Wiggle and Jiggle to Work Right, New Research Suggests
14-Jul-2022 11:00 AM EDT
Protein Parts Must Indeed Wiggle and Jiggle to Work Right, New Research Suggests
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report they have probed the atomic structure of proteins to add to evidence that the wobbles, shakes and quivers of proteins play a critical role in their ability to function. The findings of the research may help scientists design new drugs that can modify or disrupt the intricate “dances” of proteins to alter their functions.

Newswise: Opening new doors: First synthetic mechanosensitive potassium channel
Released: 15-Jul-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Opening new doors: First synthetic mechanosensitive potassium channel
Tokyo Institute of Technology

Intrigued by the properties of ion channel proteins commonly observed in cells, Tokyo Tech researchers have developed the first synthetic mechanosensitive potassium channel using a newly developed aromatic fluorinated amphiphilic cyclophane.

Released: 14-Jul-2022 12:00 PM EDT
10 scientists elected leaders of the ASBMB
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

Voting members of the scientific society chose a new secretary, re-elected three people to the governing council, and selected new committee members.

Newswise: Study Suggests That C. Difficile Drives Some Colorectal Cancers
Released: 14-Jul-2022 10:00 AM EDT
Study Suggests That C. Difficile Drives Some Colorectal Cancers
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Data collected by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy suggest that Clostridioides difficile, or C. diff, a bacterial species well known for causing serious diarrheal infections, may also drive colorectal cancer.

Released: 13-Jul-2022 11:30 AM EDT
UChicago Medicine invites community to provide input to help shape the South Side’s cancer center of the future
University of Chicago Medical Center

As part of UChicago Medicine's community engagement efforts, the public is invited to provide input to inform the services and offerings at what will be the state’s only freestanding comprehensive cancer center.

Newswise: Research Finds That Cancer Cells Can Migrate Toward Certain ‘Sweet Spot’ Environments
Released: 12-Jul-2022 2:30 PM EDT
Research Finds That Cancer Cells Can Migrate Toward Certain ‘Sweet Spot’ Environments
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

University of Minnesota Twin Cities engineers have discovered that cancer cells invade the body based on their environment. The discovery provides new understanding of how cancer spreads and can improve future treatments.

Newswise: Cancer cells behave like Goldilocks – Researchers have resolved the mystery of cancer cell steering
Released: 12-Jul-2022 12:10 PM EDT
Cancer cells behave like Goldilocks – Researchers have resolved the mystery of cancer cell steering
University of Turku (Turun yliopisto)

An international research group has investigated the mechanisms of cell migration and the impact of tissue rigidity on cell positioning and steering.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-structure-found-in-cells
VIDEO
Released: 12-Jul-2022 12:05 PM EDT
New Structure Found in Cells
Washington University in St. Louis

A research group led by Rohit Pappu in the McKelvey School of Engineering and Anthony Hyman at the Max Planck Institute have discovered a new, relevant level of structure in cells.

Newswise: X-Rays Help Researchers Piece Together Treasured Cellular Gateway for First Time
Released: 11-Jul-2022 2:05 PM EDT
X-Rays Help Researchers Piece Together Treasured Cellular Gateway for First Time
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

After almost two decades of synchrotron experiments, Caltech scientists have captured a clear picture of a cell’s nuclear pores, which are the doors and windows through which critical material in your body flows in and out of the cell’s nucleus. These findings could lead to new treatments of certain cancers, autoimmune diseases and heart conditions.

Newswise: Breakthrough in Study of How Epithelial Cells Become Cancerous
Released: 11-Jul-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Breakthrough in Study of How Epithelial Cells Become Cancerous
Osaka University

A research group led by Osaka University have discovered a mechanism by which cancerous epithelial cells can evade the usual cellular defenses to become invasive.

Newswise: Study Reveals Yunnanozoans as the Oldest Known Stem Vertebrates
Released: 7-Jul-2022 4:10 PM EDT
Study Reveals Yunnanozoans as the Oldest Known Stem Vertebrates
Chinese Academy of Sciences

Scientists have long puzzled over the gap in the fossil record that would explain the evolution of invertebrates to vertebrates. Vertebrates, including fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals, and humans, share unique features, such as a backbone and a skull. Invertebrates are animals without backbones.


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