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Newswise: Breaching the Blood-Brain Barrier to Deliver Precious Payloads
Released: 7-May-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Breaching the Blood-Brain Barrier to Deliver Precious Payloads
Georgia Institute of Technology

RNA-based drugs may change the standard of care for many diseases, making personalized medicine a reality. So far these cost-effective, easy-to-manufacture drugs haven’t been very useful in treating brain tumors and other brain disease. But a team of researchers at Georgia Tech and Emory University has shown that a combination of ultrasound and RNA-loaded nanoparticles can temporarily open the protective blood-brain barrier, allowing the delivery of potent medicine to brain tumors.

Released: 5-May-2021 5:00 PM EDT
New Method Identifies Tau Aggregates Occurring in Healthy Body Structures
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers used microscopy and machine learning to distinguish tau protein aggregates occurring as part of healthy functions from those occurring in disease

Released: 5-May-2021 4:55 PM EDT
UIC researcher finds possible novel migraine therapy
University of Illinois at Chicago

By discovering a potential new cellular mechanism for migraines, researchers may have also found a new way to treat chronic migraine. Amynah Pradhan, associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Illinois Chicago, is the senior author of the study, whose goal was to identify a new mechanism of chronic migraine, and propose a cellular pathway for migraine therapies.

Newswise: 3D Bioprinting Technique Controls Cell Orientation
Released: 5-May-2021 9:30 AM EDT
3D Bioprinting Technique Controls Cell Orientation
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Cell tissues tend to be highly ordered in terms of spatial distribution and alignment, so bioengineered cellular scaffolds for tissue engineering applications must closely resemble this orientation to be able to perform like natural tissue. In Applied Physics Reviews, from AIP Publishing, an international research team describes its approach for directing cell orientation within deposited hydrogel fibers via a method called multicompartmental bioprinting.

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Released: 4-May-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Chemical 'nose' sniffs critical differences in DNA structures
University of California, Riverside

Small changes in the structure of DNA have been implicated in breast cancer and other diseases, but they've been extremely difficult to detect -- until now.

Newswise: 2021 Warren Alpert Prize Awarded to Two Scientists for RNA Discoveries
Released: 3-May-2021 4:00 PM EDT
2021 Warren Alpert Prize Awarded to Two Scientists for RNA Discoveries
Harvard Medical School

The 2021 Warren Alpert Foundation Prize has been awarded to scientists Lynne Maquat and Joan Steitz for seminal discoveries in the biology and function of RNA, the workhorse molecule of cells. Their discoveries have reshaped the understanding of RNA’s myriad roles in healthy cell function and in disease-causing dysfunction and have informed the conceptualization and design of RNA-based therapies in various stages of development.

Newswise: University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers reveal elusive inner workings of antioxidant enzyme with therapeutic potential
Released: 3-May-2021 4:00 PM EDT
University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers reveal elusive inner workings of antioxidant enzyme with therapeutic potential
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

The enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase helps maintain human health by keeping the amount of reactive oxygen molecules in cells under control. Using neutron scattering at ORNL, researchers obtained a complete atomic portrait of the enzyme, revealing key information about its catalytic mechanism.

Released: 3-May-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Genetics, not the intrauterine environment, controls abnormal development
Yale University

Yale researchers have shown that developmental abnormalities, including those that lead to pregnancy loss and autism, are controlled by the genetics of the fetus and placenta -- and not the mother's intrauterine environment.

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Released: 30-Apr-2021 4:05 PM EDT
The novel coronavirus' spike protein plays additional key role in illness
Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Scientists have known for a while that SARS-CoV-2's distinctive "spike" proteins help the virus infect its host by latching on to healthy cells. Now, a major new study shows that they also play a key role in the disease itself.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Molecular biologists travel back in time 3 billion years
Uppsala University

A research group working at Uppsala University has succeeded in studying 'translation factors' - important components of a cell's protein synthesis machinery - that are several billion years old.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 9:30 PM EDT
Three Researchers Elected to the National Academy of Sciences
Harvard Medical School

Three Harvard Medical School researchers recognized for distinguished achievements in research

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Released: 27-Apr-2021 3:35 PM EDT
The first comprehensive single-cell atlas of human teeth
University of Zurich

During the last 30 years, medical and dental research has attracted a large number of scientists and practitioners working on aspects of high medical relevance that involve a combination of genetic and tissue regeneration approaches.

Newswise: New method preserves viable fruit fly embryos in liquid nitrogen
Released: 27-Apr-2021 12:05 PM EDT
New method preserves viable fruit fly embryos in liquid nitrogen
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A University of Minnesota team has developed a first-of-its-kind method that cryopreserves fruit fly embryos so they can be successfully recovered and developed into adult insects. Cryopreservation of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) is crucial to genetics research and critical to scientific breakthroughs benefiting human health.

Newswise: Wistar Expands International Training of the Next Generation of Scientists With the University of Bologna
Released: 27-Apr-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Wistar Expands International Training of the Next Generation of Scientists With the University of Bologna
Wistar Institute

Wistar and the University of Bologna (Unibo) in Italy have established the Wistar-Unibo Ph.D. Exchange Program in Cell and Molecular Biology to bring Unibo graduate students to Wistar for their three-year Ph.D. training.

Newswise: Huntsman Cancer Institute Executive and Researcher Mary Beckerle Elected to National Academy of Sciences
Released: 26-Apr-2021 9:05 PM EDT
Huntsman Cancer Institute Executive and Researcher Mary Beckerle Elected to National Academy of Sciences
Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

The National Academy of Sciences has elected Mary Beckerle, PhD, Huntsman Cancer Institute CEO, as a member. Beckerle is among 120 newly elected members announced to the public in a press release during the annual meeting of the National Academy.

Released: 26-Apr-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Genetic Changes in Head and Neck Cancer, Immunotherapy Resistance Identified
University of California San Diego Health

A multi-institutional team of researchers, led by UC San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center, has identified both the genetic abnormalities that drive pre-cancer cells into becoming an invasive type of head and neck cancer and patients who are least likely to respond to immunotherapy.

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Released: 26-Apr-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Nanobodies inhibit SARS-CoV-2 infection
Walter & Eliza Hall Institute

Australian researchers have identified neutralising nanobodies that block the SARS-CoV-2 virus from entering cells in preclinical models.

Released: 26-Apr-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Cell adaptation in critically ill could be difference between life and death
University of Plymouth

Creating the best conditions for cells to make energy and survive critical illness is a challenge little understood in modern medicine.

Newswise: Discovery of an elusive cell type in fish sensory organs
Released: 26-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Discovery of an elusive cell type in fish sensory organs
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

The Piotrowski Lab has reported newly identified invasive ionocytes in the sensory organs of larval and adult zebrafish fish that may provide clues to how sensory organs continue to function in changing environments.

Newswise: Victoria Blaho receives prestigious Lina M. Obeid Award
Released: 22-Apr-2021 3:00 PM EDT
Victoria Blaho receives prestigious Lina M. Obeid Award
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Victoria Blaho, Ph.D., assistant professor in the Immunity and Pathogenesis Program at Sanford Burnham Prebys, has received the first-ever Lina M. Obeid Award for her promising research on the biology of sphingolipids. The award honors Obeid, a pioneer in the field of sphingolipids and a fierce advocate for women in science. The award was presented at the 11th International Ceramide Conference on April 22, 2021.

Newswise: Green Algae Express Genes More Like Bacteria than Previously Thought
Released: 22-Apr-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Green Algae Express Genes More Like Bacteria than Previously Thought
Department of Energy, Office of Science

To fulfill its function, a gene must first be “transcribed” into an RNA molecule that is in turn “translated” into a protein that controls cells. Bacteria use a type of transcription that scientists previously believed was extremely rare in eukaryotes—animals, plants, fungi, and green algae. A new study finds that hundreds of proteins in many species of green algae use the same type of transcription as bacteria.

Released: 22-Apr-2021 7:00 AM EDT
Tissue Repair, Mitochondrial Function and Wound Healing Explored in 2021 APS President’s Symposium
American Physiological Society (APS)

Top researchers in physiology will present a three-part series exploring cellular regulation of mitochondrial function, tissue repair and wound healing. The APS President’s Symposium Series will be part of the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2021, which will be held on a virtual platform April 27–30.

Released: 20-Apr-2021 7:00 AM EDT
Nobel Laureate, Leading Physiologists to Give Distinguished Award Lectures at Experimental Biology
American Physiological Society (APS)

Four esteemed researchers will present the American Physiological Society’s (APS) most distinguished award lectures at the APS annual meeting at Experimental Biology (EB) 2021. The meeting will be held virtually April 27–30.

19-Apr-2021 7:00 AM EDT
Omega-3 supplements do double duty in protecting against stress
Ohio State University

A high daily dose of an omega-3 supplement may help slow the effects of aging by suppressing damage and boosting protection at the cellular level during and after a stressful event, new research suggests.

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Released: 14-Apr-2021 1:45 PM EDT
Lab study solves textbook problem: How cells know their size
Dartmouth College

Scientists have searched for years to understand how cells measure their size. Cell size is critical. It's what regulates cell division in a growing organism.

Released: 13-Apr-2021 5:05 PM EDT
The Chillest Ape: How Humans Evolved A Super-High Cooling Capacity
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Humans have a uniquely high density of sweat glands embedded in their skin—10 times the density of chimpanzees and macaques. Now, researchers at Penn Medicine have discovered how this distinctive, hyper-cooling trait evolved in the human genome.

Newswise: Why Patients with Severe Asthma May be Resistant to Corticosteroid Therapy
Released: 13-Apr-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Why Patients with Severe Asthma May be Resistant to Corticosteroid Therapy
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Wheezing, coughing that doesn’t stop, a pale and sweaty face: clinically, severe asthma attacks look very similar from patient to patient. But biologically, not all severe asthma is the same—and a team of scientists has, for the first time, identified the key difference in people, a finding that has important implications for treatment.

Newswise: Researchers Discover New Way to Monitor and Prevent Nerve Cell Deterioration after Brain Injury
Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Researchers Discover New Way to Monitor and Prevent Nerve Cell Deterioration after Brain Injury
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Potential mechanistic link shown between Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer’s disease

Newswise: Amoeba Biology Reveals Potential Treatment Target for Lung Disease
Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Amoeba Biology Reveals Potential Treatment Target for Lung Disease
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In a series of experiments that began with amoebas — single-celled organisms that extend podlike appendages to move around — Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists say they have identified a genetic pathway that could be activated to help sweep out mucus from the lungs of people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease a widespread lung ailment.

Released: 12-Apr-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Scientists Reveal COVID-19 News, Next Frontier in Fighting Substance Abuse, More
Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB)

Register for online access to cutting-edge science at Experimental Biology 2021, April 27–30

Released: 12-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Pain Receptors Linked to the Generation of Energy-Burning Fat Cells: Implications for Obesity Therapy
Joslin Diabetes Center

A new source of energy expending brown fat cells has been uncovered by researchers at the Joslin Diabetes Center, which they say points towards potential new therapeutic options for obesity. According to the new report, published in Nature Metabolism >on 12 March 2021, the key lies in the expression of a receptor called Trpv1 (temperature-sensitive ion channel transient receptor potential cation subfamily V member 1) -- a protein known to sense noxious stimuli, including pain and temperature.

Newswise: Mutant KRAS and p53 cooperate to drive pancreatic cancer metastasis
Released: 12-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Mutant KRAS and p53 cooperate to drive pancreatic cancer metastasis
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Preclinical research identifies CREB1 as new therapeutic target downstream of frequently mutated genes

Newswise: How Did 500 Species of a Fish Form in a Lake?  Dramatically Different Body Clocks
Released: 8-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
How Did 500 Species of a Fish Form in a Lake? Dramatically Different Body Clocks
Florida Atlantic University

Despite the dramatic difference between day and nightlife, how fish exploit different times of day has not been studied systematically. Scientists explored alterations in the circadian timing of activity and the duration of rest-wake cycles in Lake Malawi’s cichlids and identified the first single nocturnal species. Timing and duration of rest and activity varies dramatically, and continuously, between populations of Lake Malawi cichlids, providing a system for exploring the molecular and neural basis underlying variation in nocturnal activity.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 4:15 PM EDT
First Images of Cells Exposed to Covid 19 Vaccine Reveal Native Like Coronavirus Spikes
University of Southampton

New research has for the first time compared images of the protein spikes that develop on the surface of cells exposed to the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to the protein spike of the SARS-CoV-19 coronavirus.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
MicroRNA-29: A Key Controller of Brain Development, Disease
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

A team led by scientists at the UNC School of Medicine identified a molecule called microRNA-29 as a powerful controller of brain maturation in mammals.

7-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Resistance to Immunotherapy in Patients with Urothelial Bladder Cancer Is Traced to Specific Sets of Immune Cells
Mount Sinai Health System

Sets of genes associated with resistance to immunotherapy in patients with metastatic urothelial cancer of the bladder have been identified and validated by researchers at Mount Sinai. In a study published in Clinical Cancer Research, the team uncovered gene signatures representing adaptive immunity and pro-tumorigenic inflammation that were responsible for sensitivity or resistance to immune checkpoint inhibitors, drugs that help the body’s immune system recognize and attack cancerous cells.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Caught in the act: New data about COVID-19 virus’s functions could aid in treatment designs
Argonne National Laboratory

For the first time, a team of researchers has captured X-ray images of a critical enzyme of the COVID-19 virus performing its function. This discovery could improve design of new treatments against the disease.

Newswise: An amyloid link between Parkinson’s disease and melanoma
30-Mar-2021 8:00 AM EDT
An amyloid link between Parkinson’s disease and melanoma
American Chemical Society (ACS)

For nearly 50 years, doctors have recognized that Parkinson’s disease patients have an increased risk of melanoma. Now, scientists report a link between the two diseases in the form of protein aggregates known as amyloids. They will present their results at ACS Spring 2021.

5-Apr-2021 7:30 AM EDT
Brain Cells Decide on Their Own When to Release Pleasure Hormone
NYU Langone Health

In addition to smoothing out wrinkles, researchers have found that the drug Botox can reveal the inner workings of the brain. A new study used it to show that feedback from individual nerve cells controls the release of dopamine, a chemical messenger involved in motivation, memory, and movement.

5-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Mysterious “Nuclear Speckle” Structures Inside Cells Enhance Gene Activity, May Help Block Cancers
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A team led by scientists at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has illuminated the functions of mysterious structures in cells called “nuclear speckles,” showing that they can work in partnership with a key protein to enhance the activities of specific sets of genes.

Released: 2-Apr-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Experimental Therapy for Parasitic Heart Disease May Also Help Stop COVID-19
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego researchers found that the chemical inhibitor K777 reduces the coronavirus’ ability to infect cell lines by blocking human enzyme cathepsin L; clinical trials are underway.

Released: 1-Apr-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Early-Career Editors join the board of Molecular Biology of the Cell journal
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) is proud to announce the selection of 24 Early-Career Editors to join the board of Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC). This new group of pre-tenure faculty and postdocs will be responsible for highlighting preprints posted on bioRxiv.

1-Apr-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Wistar Scientists Discover New Mechanism Through Which Senescent Cells Turn On Genes That Encode for Secreted Tumor-regulating Factors
Wistar Institute

Wistar scientists identified a new mechanism of transcriptional control of cellular senescence that drives the release of inflammatory molecules that influence tumor development through altering the surrounding microenvironment.

Released: 31-Mar-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Journal of Lipid Research names new junior associate editors
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

The program, now in its second year, was created to achieve two chief goals: demystify the peer-review process and train the next generation of journal leaders. Each junior associate editor will serve a two-year term.

Newswise: Researchers Develop New Method for Identifying Mutational Signatures in Cancer
Released: 30-Mar-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Researchers Develop New Method for Identifying Mutational Signatures in Cancer
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center used machine learning techniques to detect mutational signatures in cancer patients. Their algorithm outperformed the current standard of analysis and revealed new mutational signatures associated with obesity, which is believed by cancer prevention experts to be becoming the most significant lifestyle factor contributing to cancer in the U.S. and most of the Western world.

Newswise: Scientists Identify Molecular Pathway That Helps Moving Cells Avoid Aimless Wandering
Released: 30-Mar-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Scientists Identify Molecular Pathway That Helps Moving Cells Avoid Aimless Wandering
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Working with fruit flies, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have identified a new molecular pathway that helps steer moving cells in specific directions. The set of interconnected proteins and enzymes in the pathway act as steering and rudder components that drive cells toward an “intended” rather than random destination, they say.

30-Mar-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Snake species from different terrains surrender surface secrets behind slithering success
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Some snake species slither across the ground, while others climb trees, dive through sand or glide across water. Today, scientists report that the surface chemistry of snake scales varies among species that negotiate these different terrains. They will present their results at ACS Spring 2021.

Released: 29-Mar-2021 6:55 PM EDT
Penn Medicine's Shelley L. Berger, PhD, and M. Celeste Simon, PhD, named 2021 Fellows of the AACR Academy
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

World-renowned genetics researcher Shelley L. Berger, PhD, and cellular biologist M. Celeste Simon, PhD, have been named as members of the 2021 class of fellows of the American Association for Cancer Research Academy.

Released: 29-Mar-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Researchers discover why cold induces tooth pain and hypersensitivity -- and how to stop it
Massachusetts General Hospital

Researchers report in Science Advances that they have uncovered a new function for odontoblasts, the cells that form dentin, the shell beneath the tooth's enamel that encases the soft dental pulp containing nerves and blood vessels.

Released: 29-Mar-2021 10:40 AM EDT
New drug to regenerate lost teeth
Kyoto University

The tooth fairy is a welcome guest for any child who has lost a tooth. Not only will the fairy leave a small gift under the pillow, but the child can be assured of a new tooth in a few months. The same cannot be said of adults who have lost their teeth.


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