Feature Channels: Cell Biology

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Newswise: A direct protein-to-protein binding couples cell survival to cell proliferation
Released: 3-Apr-2020 3:20 PM EDT
A direct protein-to-protein binding couples cell survival to cell proliferation
University of Alabama at Birmingham

The regulators of apoptosis watch over cell replication and the decision to enter the cell cycle. Researchers now show a direct link between the protein MCL1 — a member of the BCL2 protein family known as the gatekeepers of apoptosis — and the cell-cycle checkpoint protein P18.

Newswise:Video Embedded media-invited-to-ask-questions-covid-19-testing-drug-discovery-infectiousness-and-more-press-conference-april-2-2020
VIDEO
Released: 3-Apr-2020 9:00 AM EDT
TRANSCRIPT AND VIDEO AVAILABLE: Media Invited to Ask Questions - COVID-19 Testing, Drug Discovery, Infectiousness, and more: Press Conference April 2, 2020
Newswise

Media are invited to attend and ask questions at this Virtual Press Conference with a Newswise Live Expert Panel to discuss the COVID-19 crisis.

Newswise: To divide or not to divide? The mother cell may decide
Released: 3-Apr-2020 8:15 AM EDT
To divide or not to divide? The mother cell may decide
University of Colorado Boulder

Researchers at CU Boulder have found that it’s the mother cell that determines if its daughter cells will divide. The finding, explained in a new study out today in Science, sheds new light on the cell cycle using modern imaging technologies, and could have implications for cancer drug therapy treatments.

Newswise: Colorado study overturns ‘snapshot’ model of cell cycle in use since 1974
Released: 2-Apr-2020 3:05 PM EDT
Colorado study overturns ‘snapshot’ model of cell cycle in use since 1974
University of Colorado Cancer Center

Live, single-cell imaging shows that cells continuously integrate the influence of growth factors, not just during G1 phase of cell cycle, as previously thought.

Released: 31-Mar-2020 8:15 AM EDT
Discovery of new biomarker in blood could lead to early test for Alzheimer’s disease
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego researchers discovered that high blood levels of RNA produced by the PHGDH gene could serve as a biomarker for early detection of Alzheimer’s disease. The work could lead to the development of a blood test to identify individuals who will develop the disease years before they show symptoms.

Newswise: Argonne's researchers and facilities playing a key role in the fight against COVID-19
Released: 27-Mar-2020 5:45 PM EDT
Argonne's researchers and facilities playing a key role in the fight against COVID-19
Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne scientists are working around the clock to analyze the virus to find new treatments and cures, predict how it will propagate through the population, and make sure that our supply chains remain intact.

Released: 27-Mar-2020 8:25 AM EDT
UC Davis launches two clinical studies to treat COVID-19
UC Davis Health

UC Davis Health has two clinical trials underway for hospitalized patients with severe COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2.

Newswise: 227812_web.jpg
Released: 26-Mar-2020 2:45 PM EDT
A critical enzyme for sperm formation could be a target for treating male infertility
University of Pennsylvania

While some of our body's cells divide in a matter of hours, the process of making sperm, meiosis, alone takes about 14 days from start to finish.

Released: 26-Mar-2020 10:30 AM EDT
How Errors in Divvying Up Chromosomes Lead to Defects in Cells
NIH, National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS)

During the fundamental process of mitosis, a type of cell division, dividing cells sometimes make errors while divvying up chromosomes. Understanding how this happens may help researchers develop targeted therapies for a variety of diseases, including cancer.

Newswise:Video Embedded slac-researcher-discovers-giant-cavity-in-key-tuberculosis-molecule
VIDEO
19-Mar-2020 1:40 PM EDT
SLAC researcher discovers giant cavity in key tuberculosis molecule
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Researchers were looking into a protein that tuberculosis bacteria need to thrive, but when they finally solved its structure, they discovered a gigantic cavity that could help shuttle a variety of molecules into TB bacteria.


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