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Newswise: Study Finds Most Common Protein in Blood is Instrumental in Enabling Human Fertilization and Fighting Infection
Released: 22-Jun-2021 12:40 PM EDT
Study Finds Most Common Protein in Blood is Instrumental in Enabling Human Fertilization and Fighting Infection
University of California, Irvine

A new University of California, Irvine-led study reveals albumin (Alb), among the most abundant proteins in the body, activates a proton channel (hHv1), also widespread in the body, giving sperm the ability to penetrate and fertilize an egg, and allowing white blood cells to secrete large amounts of inflammatory mediators to fight infection.

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Released: 21-Jun-2021 4:35 PM EDT
How do developing spinal cords choose 'heads' or 'tails'?
Gladstone Institutes

The progression from a round ball of cells to an embryo with a head and a tail is one of the most critical steps in an organism's development.

Newswise: Researchers Dig Deeper into How Cells Transport their Waste for Recycling
15-Jun-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Researchers Dig Deeper into How Cells Transport their Waste for Recycling
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys have gained a deeper insight into the intricacies of autophagy, the process in which cells degrade and recycle cellular components.

Released: 17-Jun-2021 1:50 PM EDT
How Cells “Read” Artificial Ingredients Tossed into Genetic Recipe
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered that the enzyme RNA polymerase II recognizes and transcribes artificially added base pairs in genetic code, a new insight that could help advance the development of new vaccines and medicines.

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Released: 15-Jun-2021 12:30 PM EDT
From symmetry to asymmetry: The two sides of life
Osaka University

On the outside, animals often appear bilaterally symmetrical with mirror-image left and right features.

Newswise: New Tissue-Closure Model May Aid in Promotion of Faster Wound Healing
Released: 14-Jun-2021 11:35 AM EDT
New Tissue-Closure Model May Aid in Promotion of Faster Wound Healing
Penn State Materials Research Institute

The observation of a previously undetected biological mechanism for closing gaps in living tissue improves basic understanding of the wound-healing process and may one day inform strategies to speed healing after surgery and could hold other medical benefits, according to a team of Penn State and Singapore researchers.

14-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Making a Meal of DNA in the Seafloor
University of Vienna

While best known as the code for genetic information, DNA is also a nutrient for specialised microbes. An international team of researchers led by Kenneth Wasmund and Alexander Loy from the University of Vienna has discovered several bacteria in sediment samples from the Atlantic Ocean that use DNA as a food source.

Newswise: Shrinking to Survive: Bacteria Adapt to a Lifestyle in Flux
Released: 14-Jun-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Shrinking to Survive: Bacteria Adapt to a Lifestyle in Flux
Washington University in St. Louis

Summer picnics and barbecues are only a few weeks away! As excited as you are to indulge this summer, Escherichia coli bacteria are eager to feast on the all-you-can-eat buffet they are about to experience in your gut. However, something unexpected will occur as E. coli cells end their journey through your digestive tract. Without warning, they will find themselves swimming in your toilet bowl, clinging to the last bits of nutrients attached to their bodies.

Newswise: DORA Announces SPACE Rubric for Analyzing Institutional Conditions and Progress Indicators
13-Jun-2021 5:00 AM EDT
DORA Announces SPACE Rubric for Analyzing Institutional Conditions and Progress Indicators
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA) is proud to announce “SPACE to Evolve Academic Assessment: A rubric for analyzing institutional conditions and progress indicators.” The SPACE rubric is the latest resource from DORA designed to support the development of fair and responsible academic assessment practices.

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Released: 11-Jun-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Decoded genome of little-known disease offers hope for citrus
University of California, Riverside

Scientists are hoping the RNA of an obscure infection can one day be used like a Trojan horse to deliver life-saving treatments to citrus trees.

7-Jun-2021 9:05 PM EDT
Discovery Identifies a Highly Efficient Human Reverse Transcriptase that can Write RNA Sequences into DNA
Thomas Jefferson University

Researchers show that polymerase theta can efficiently convert RNA sequences back into DNA, a feat more common in viruses than eukaryotic cells.

Released: 10-Jun-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Researchers' algorithm to make CRISPR gene editing more precise
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

It eventually became a Nobel prize-winning revolution when researchers first engineered CRISPR as a gene editing technology for bacterial, plant, animal and human cells.

Newswise: Healthy Fat Impacted by Change in Diet and Circadian Clock, Study Finds
Released: 9-Jun-2021 7:05 PM EDT
Healthy Fat Impacted by Change in Diet and Circadian Clock, Study Finds
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Changing your eating habits or altering your circadian clock can impact healthy fat tissue throughout your lifespan, according to a preclinical study published today in Nature by researchers with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Newswise: Not Just A Phase For RNAS
Released: 9-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Not Just A Phase For RNAS
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – June 9, 2021 – A phenomenon in which an RNA named NORAD drives a protein named Pumilio to form liquid droplets in cells, much like oil in water, appears to tightly regulate the activity of Pumilio. A new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests that such RNA-driven “phase separation,” in turn, protects against genome instability, premature aging, and neurodegenerative diseases, and may represent a previously unrecognized way for RNAs to regulate cellular processes.

Newswise: Microgel coating gives donor cells a boost in reversing pulmonary fibrosis
Released: 8-Jun-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Microgel coating gives donor cells a boost in reversing pulmonary fibrosis
University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers have shown that even after lung tissue has been damaged, it may be possible to reverse fibrosis and promote tissue repair through treatment with microgel-coated mesenchymal stromal cells.

Released: 4-Jun-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Understanding the skin’s defense system
Michigan State University

It can be easy to forget that the human skin is an organ. It’s also the largest one and it’s exposed, charged with keeping our inner biology safe from the perils of the outside world. But Michigan State University’s Sangbum Park is someone who never takes skin or its biological functions for granted. He’s studying skin at the cellular level to better understand it and help us support it when it’s fighting injury, infection or disease.

Newswise: Noted Researcher and Scientific Leader Jack E. Dixon Retires
Released: 27-May-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Noted Researcher and Scientific Leader Jack E. Dixon Retires
University of California San Diego Health

Jack E. Dixon, whose distinguished and varied 48-year career ranged from helping reveal how cells communicate to becoming a renowned scientific leader at UC San Diego School of Medicine and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, is retiring.

25-May-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Global Study Finds Each City Has Unique Microbiome Fingerprint of Bacteria and Viruses
University of Maryland Medical Center

Each city has its own unique microbiome, a "fingerprint" of viruses and bacteria that uniquely identify it, according to a new study from an international consortium of researchers that included a team from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). The international project, which sequenced and analyzed samples collected from public transit systems and hospitals in 60 cities around the world, was published today in the journal Cell.

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Released: 21-May-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Telling up from down: How marine flatworms learn to sense gravity
Okayama University

All living organisms are equipped with sensory organs to detect changes in their surrounding environment.

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Released: 21-May-2021 1:50 PM EDT
A novel defense mechanism for SARS-CoV-2 discovered
Hokkaido University

Scientists from Hokkaido University have discovered a novel defensive response to SARS-CoV-2 that involves the viral pattern recognition receptor RIG-I.

Newswise: How Human Cells And Pathogenic Shigella Engage in Battle
Released: 21-May-2021 12:55 PM EDT
How Human Cells And Pathogenic Shigella Engage in Battle
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – May 21, 2021 – One member of a large protein family that is known to stop the spread of bacterial infections by prompting infected human cells to self-destruct appears to kill the infectious bacteria instead, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists shows. However, some bacteria have their own mechanism to thwart this attack, nullifying the deadly protein by tagging it for destruction.

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Released: 20-May-2021 12:40 PM EDT
The entire genome from Peştera Muierii 1 sequenced
Uppsala University

For the first time, researchers have successfully sequenced the entire genome from the skull of Peştera Muierii 1, a woman who lived in today's Romania 35,000 years ago.

Released: 19-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Genetic Tools Help Identify a Cellular Culprit for Type 1 Diabetes
University of California San Diego Health

By mapping its genetic underpinnings, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have identified a predictive causal role for specific cell types in type 1 diabetes, a condition that affects more than 1.6 million Americans.

Released: 17-May-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Researchers Discover First Immune Stimulating Long Noncoding RNA Involved in Body's Response to Cancer
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

U-M researchers have discovered the first immune stimulating long noncoding RNA Involved in the body's response to cancer, suggesting potential approaches to improve immunotherapy treatment.

Newswise: Sperm help ‘persuade’ the female to accept pregnancy
Released: 17-May-2021 8:50 AM EDT
Sperm help ‘persuade’ the female to accept pregnancy
University of Adelaide

Sperm are generally viewed as having just one action in reproduction – to fertilise the female’s egg – but studies at the University of Adelaide are overturning that view.

Released: 16-May-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Study Shows Significant Reduction in Triglycerides in Patients at High Risk for Acute Pancreatitis Through Novel Monoclonal Antibody
Mount Sinai Health System

The investigational drug evinacumab reduced triglycerides in patients with severe hypertriglyceridemia (sHTG) and a history of hospitalizations for acute pancreatitis in a phase 2 global study led by Mount Sinai

Released: 14-May-2021 2:05 PM EDT
No-one knew if lymph vessel cells bear cilia; turns out, they're indispensable for health
Frontiers

The primary cilium, an antenna-like subcellular structure ('organelle') protruding from the outside of many types of vertebrate cells, has an important but previously overlooked role in guiding the growth of lymphatic vessels, shows a new study.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-research-optimizes-body-s-own-immune-system-to-fight-cancer
VIDEO
Released: 14-May-2021 11:40 AM EDT
New research optimizes body’s own immune system to fight cancer
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A groundbreaking study led by engineering and medical researchers at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities shows how engineered immune cells used in new cancer therapies can overcome physical barriers to allow a patient’s own immune system to fight tumors. The research could improve cancer therapies in the future for millions of people worldwide.

Newswise: Researchers Develop First-in-Class Inhibitors Against Key Leukemia Protein
Released: 14-May-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Researchers Develop First-in-Class Inhibitors Against Key Leukemia Protein
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers have developed first-in-class small-molecule inhibitors against a key leukemia protein, ASH1L.

Released: 11-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
MD Anderson and Broad Institute launch new translational research platform focused on rare cancers
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

MD Anderson and the Broad Institute have launched a translational research platform to study rare cancers. The initiative will lead to a first-of-its-kind resource for the scientific community and will help to accelerate new therapies for patients with rare tumor types.

Released: 11-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Heme Is Not Just for Impossible Burgers
Washington University in St. Louis

It took an unlikely food innovation — earth-friendly vegetarian patties, made to taste and “bleed” like the familiar meaty ones — to make people aware of heme. But heme is an essential part of proteins found in most life forms, from tiny bacteria to soy plants to the human body. Heme plays a crucial role in supplying cells with the energy needed to carry out chemical reactions.

Released: 10-May-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Biomarker detects severe COVID-19 early on
University of Zurich

Most people who are infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop no or only mild symptoms.

Released: 10-May-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Agents that target viral RNA could be the basis for next generation anti-viral drugs
University of Birmingham

A new approach to tackling viruses by targeting the 'control centre' in viral RNA could lead to broad spectrum anti-viral drugs and provide a first line of defence against future pandemics, according to new research at the University of Birmingham.

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Released: 10-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Errors at the start of life
Max Planck Society (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft)

Only one in three fertilizations leads to a successful pregnancy. Many embryos fail to progress beyond early development.

Newswise: How Legionella Makes Itself At Home
Released: 10-May-2021 11:05 AM EDT
How Legionella Makes Itself At Home
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – May 10, 2021 – Scientists at UT Southwestern have discovered a key protein that helps the bacteria that causes Legionnaires’ disease to set up house in the cells of humans and other hosts. The findings, published in Science, could offer insights into how other bacteria are able to survive inside cells, knowledge that could lead to new treatments for a wide variety of infections.

Newswise: Breaching the Blood-Brain Barrier to Deliver Precious Payloads
Released: 7-May-2021 11:35 AM EDT
Breaching the Blood-Brain Barrier to Deliver Precious Payloads
Georgia Institute of Technology

RNA-based drugs may change the standard of care for many diseases, making personalized medicine a reality. So far these cost-effective, easy-to-manufacture drugs haven’t been very useful in treating brain tumors and other brain disease. But a team of researchers at Georgia Tech and Emory University has shown that a combination of ultrasound and RNA-loaded nanoparticles can temporarily open the protective blood-brain barrier, allowing the delivery of potent medicine to brain tumors.

Released: 5-May-2021 5:00 PM EDT
New Method Identifies Tau Aggregates Occurring in Healthy Body Structures
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers used microscopy and machine learning to distinguish tau protein aggregates occurring as part of healthy functions from those occurring in disease

Released: 5-May-2021 4:55 PM EDT
UIC researcher finds possible novel migraine therapy
University of Illinois at Chicago

By discovering a potential new cellular mechanism for migraines, researchers may have also found a new way to treat chronic migraine. Amynah Pradhan, associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Illinois Chicago, is the senior author of the study, whose goal was to identify a new mechanism of chronic migraine, and propose a cellular pathway for migraine therapies.

Newswise: 3D Bioprinting Technique Controls Cell Orientation
Released: 5-May-2021 9:30 AM EDT
3D Bioprinting Technique Controls Cell Orientation
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Cell tissues tend to be highly ordered in terms of spatial distribution and alignment, so bioengineered cellular scaffolds for tissue engineering applications must closely resemble this orientation to be able to perform like natural tissue. In Applied Physics Reviews, from AIP Publishing, an international research team describes its approach for directing cell orientation within deposited hydrogel fibers via a method called multicompartmental bioprinting.

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Released: 4-May-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Chemical 'nose' sniffs critical differences in DNA structures
University of California, Riverside

Small changes in the structure of DNA have been implicated in breast cancer and other diseases, but they've been extremely difficult to detect -- until now.

Newswise: 2021 Warren Alpert Prize Awarded to Two Scientists for RNA Discoveries
Released: 3-May-2021 4:00 PM EDT
2021 Warren Alpert Prize Awarded to Two Scientists for RNA Discoveries
Harvard Medical School

The 2021 Warren Alpert Foundation Prize has been awarded to scientists Lynne Maquat and Joan Steitz for seminal discoveries in the biology and function of RNA, the workhorse molecule of cells. Their discoveries have reshaped the understanding of RNA’s myriad roles in healthy cell function and in disease-causing dysfunction and have informed the conceptualization and design of RNA-based therapies in various stages of development.

Newswise: University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers reveal elusive inner workings of antioxidant enzyme with therapeutic potential
Released: 3-May-2021 4:00 PM EDT
University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers reveal elusive inner workings of antioxidant enzyme with therapeutic potential
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

The enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase helps maintain human health by keeping the amount of reactive oxygen molecules in cells under control. Using neutron scattering at ORNL, researchers obtained a complete atomic portrait of the enzyme, revealing key information about its catalytic mechanism.

Released: 3-May-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Genetics, not the intrauterine environment, controls abnormal development
Yale University

Yale researchers have shown that developmental abnormalities, including those that lead to pregnancy loss and autism, are controlled by the genetics of the fetus and placenta -- and not the mother's intrauterine environment.


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