Feature Channels: Drug Resistance

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Newswise: Trained Viruses Prove More Effective at Fighting Antibiotic Resistance
Released: 7-Jun-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Trained Viruses Prove More Effective at Fighting Antibiotic Resistance
University of California San Diego

Research reveals that phage viruses that undergo special evolutionary training increase their capacity to subdue bacteria. The results provide hope for the antibiotic resistance crisis, a rising threat as deadly bacteria continue to evolve to render many modern drugs ineffective.

4-Jun-2021 4:50 PM EDT
Global travelers pick up numerous genes that promote microbial resistance
Washington University in St. Louis

Research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that international travelers often return home with new bacterial strains jostling for position among the thousands that normally reside within the gut microbiome. Such travel is contributing to the rapid global increase and spread of antimicrobial resistance.

Released: 11-May-2021 12:40 PM EDT
Researchers find target to fight antibiotic resistance
University of Georgia

New research from the University of Georgia suggests a component of bacteria’s cell walls may hold the key to crushing the antibiotic-resistant microbes.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 5:00 PM EDT
Texas A&M AgriLife Research investigating phages to fight bacterial infection
Texas A&M AgriLife

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIAID, part of the National Institutes of Health, NIH, has awarded $2.5 million in grants to support research on bacteriophage therapy, and Texas A&M AgriLife Research is among the grant recipients.

Newswise: Paleopharmaceuticals from Baltic amber might fight drug-resistant infections
30-Mar-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Paleopharmaceuticals from Baltic amber might fight drug-resistant infections
American Chemical Society (ACS)

For centuries, people in Baltic nations have used ancient amber for medicinal purposes. Now, scientists report compounds that help explain its therapeutic effects and that could lead to new medicines to combat antibiotic-resistant infections. They will present their results at ACS Spring 2021.

Newswise: CU Cancer Researcher Wins Two Awards to Study Drug-Resistant Cancer Cells
18-Mar-2021 2:55 PM EDT
CU Cancer Researcher Wins Two Awards to Study Drug-Resistant Cancer Cells
University of Colorado Cancer Center

Sabrina L. Spencer, PhD, is a CU Boulder researcher and CU Cancer Center member. Spencer recently won the Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award and the Emerging Leader Award. She will use the grants to continue her research on drug resistance in cancer cells.

Released: 17-Mar-2021 10:05 PM EDT
Singapore scientists found a new way to improve treatment outcomes for breast cancer
National University of Singapore

Researchers from Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at NUS and A*STAR’s Genome Institute of Singapore as well as their collaborators have discovered the molecular pathway that interferes with breast cancer drugs, and found an additional drug that will reverse the effect. This discovery could give cancer patients more hope of overcoming the disease.

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Released: 16-Mar-2021 4:45 PM EDT
How bacterial traffic jams lead to antibiotic-resistant, multilayer biofilms
eLife

The bacterial equivalent of a traffic jam causes multilayered biofilms to form in the presence of antibiotics, shows a study published today in eLife.

Released: 8-Mar-2021 10:05 AM EST
Diphtheria risks becoming major global threat again as it evolves antimicrobial resistance
University of Cambridge

Diphtheria - a relatively easily-preventable infection - is evolving to become resistant to a number of classes of antibiotics and in future could lead to vaccine escape, warn an international team of researchers from the UK and India.

Released: 22-Feb-2021 11:35 AM EST
Antibiotic tolerance study paves way for new treatments
Cornell University

The study in mice, “A Multifaceted Cellular Damage Repair and Prevention Pathway Promotes High Level Tolerance to Beta-lactam Antibiotics,” published Feb. 3 in the journal EMBO Reports, reveals how tolerance occurs, thanks to a system that mitigates iron toxicity in bacteria that have been exposed to penicillin.

Released: 18-Feb-2021 11:55 AM EST
Antibiotic tolerance study paves way for new treatments
Cornell University

A new study identifies a mechanism that makes bacteria tolerant to penicillin and related antibiotics, findings that could lead to new therapies that boost the effectiveness of these treatments.

Newswise: Older adults and antibiotics: Study shows healthy attitudes but unhealthy practices
Released: 18-Feb-2021 8:05 AM EST
Older adults and antibiotics: Study shows healthy attitudes but unhealthy practices
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

While most adults over 50 understand that overuse of antibiotics is a problem, and say they’re cautious about taking the drugs, a sizable minority have used antibiotics for something other than their original purpose, and appear to think the drugs could help treat colds, which are caused by viruses not bacteria.

Newswise: Grant to help fill gaps in how livestock manure management affects antibiotic resistance
Released: 16-Feb-2021 12:55 PM EST
Grant to help fill gaps in how livestock manure management affects antibiotic resistance
Iowa State University

Iowa State University researchers received a $1 million grant to study how manure management systems in livestock production may give rise to antibiotic resistance. Human, animal and environmental health interact in complex ways that influence the pace at which antibiotic resistance spreads, and the researchers hope their work will shed light on these connections.

Released: 15-Feb-2021 9:25 AM EST
Moffitt Researchers Use Mathematical Modeling to Identify Factors that Determine Adaptive Therapy Success
Moffitt Cancer Center

In a new article featured on this month’s cover of Cancer Research, Moffitt Cancer Center researchers, in collaboration with Oxford University, report results from their study using mathematical modeling to show that cell turnover impacts drug resistance and is an important factor that governs the success of adaptive therapy.

Newswise: UTEP Fights Superbugs with $1.2 Million NIH Grant to Develop a New Way to Produce Antibiotics
Released: 2-Feb-2021 12:05 PM EST
UTEP Fights Superbugs with $1.2 Million NIH Grant to Develop a New Way to Produce Antibiotics
University of Texas at El Paso

Chu-Young Kim, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry at The University of Texas at El Paso, is helping combat the threat of superbugs – illnesses caused by drug-resistant bacteria – by returning to nature. His work is supported by a $1.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to develop a biological method for producing new versions of current antibiotics that have become ineffective due to resistance

Released: 28-Jan-2021 10:55 AM EST
Livestock workers face high MRSA risk
Michigan State University

For Michigan State University’s Felicia Wu, the surprise isn’t that people who work with livestock are at higher risk of picking up antibiotic-resistant bacteria, but instead how much higher their risk levels are. “This is a bit of a wakeup call,” said Wu, John. A Hannah Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Food Science and Human Nutrition and Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics. “I don’t think there was much awareness that swine workers are at such high risk, for example. Or that large animal vets are also at extremely high risk.”

Released: 28-Jan-2021 8:40 AM EST
New Vaccine Development Platform Could Fight Deadly, Multi-Drug Resistant Bacteria
Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU)

A new vaccine development platform has proven effective in protecting against deadly, hard-to-treat infections caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) bacteria, thanks to a collaborative endeavor led by Dr. Michael J. Daly, a professor in the Uniformed Services University's (USU) Department of Pathology, Dr. Gregory J. Tobin, president of Biological Mimetics, Inc., and Dr. Daniel Zurawski at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. This could ultimately help prevent battlefield infections, as well as common hospital-acquired infections in patients undergoing routine surgeries.

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Released: 21-Jan-2021 12:25 PM EST
Antibiotic resistance may spread even more easily than expected
Chalmers University of Technology

Pathogenic bacteria in humans are developing resistance to antibiotics much faster than expected. Now, computational research at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shows that one reason could be significant genetic transfer between bacteria in our ecosystems and to humans. This work has also led to new tools for resistance researchers.

Newswise: Monell Center Receives Kleberg Foundation Grant to Discriminate Bacterial and Viral Immune Responses to Reduce Antibiotic Use
Released: 20-Jan-2021 12:40 PM EST
Monell Center Receives Kleberg Foundation Grant to Discriminate Bacterial and Viral Immune Responses to Reduce Antibiotic Use
Monell Chemical Senses Center

The Monell Chemical Senses Center has received a two-year, $890,000 grant from the Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. and Helen C. Kleberg Foundation. Monell scientists and collaborators will develop a new way to classify fever-inducing diseases using distinct signatures of volatile chemicals from urine and saliva.

Newswise: Unlocking 'the shape of water' in mechanisms of antibiotic resistance
Released: 19-Jan-2021 3:05 PM EST
Unlocking 'the shape of water' in mechanisms of antibiotic resistance
University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers captured and comparted hi-res images of ribosome structures from sensitive and resistant bacteria and report that a water molecule needed for antibiotic binding was not present in the ribosomes from the drug-resistant bugs.

Newswise:Video Embedded cancer-cells-hibernate-like-bears-to-evade-harsh-chemotherapy
VIDEO
Released: 7-Jan-2021 3:45 PM EST
Cancer Cells Hibernate Like Bears to Evade Harsh Chemotherapy
University Health Network (UHN)

Princess Margaret Scientist Dr. Catherine O’Brien and team discovered that cancer cells hijack an evolutionary conserved program to survive chemotherapy. Furthermore, the researchers show that novel therapeutic strategies aimed at specifically targeting cancer cells in this slow-dividing state can prevent cancer regrowth.

Newswise:Video Embedded protein-twist-and-squeeze-confers-cancer-drug-resistance
VIDEO
Released: 29-Dec-2020 2:35 PM EST
Protein twist and squeeze confers cancer drug resistance
Kyoto University

In 1986, cellular biochemist Kazumitsu Ueda, currently at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS), discovered that a protein called ABCB1 could transport multiple chemotherapeutics out of some cancer cells, making them resistant to treatment.

Released: 24-Dec-2020 8:00 AM EST
Ludwig Cancer Research Study Reveals How Circular ecDNA is Generated and Drives Drug Resistance in Cancer
Ludwig Cancer Research

Researchers led by Ludwig San Diego Member Don Cleveland and Peter Campbell of the Sanger Center have solved the mystery of how free-floating circular DNA fragments, which are almost exclusively found in cancer cells, drive gene amplification to generate drug resistance in cancer.

Released: 1-Dec-2020 9:00 AM EST
New device offers faster way to detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria
Binghamton University, State University of New York

A new device for faster testing of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been developed by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Newswise: Antibiotic resistance genes in three Puerto Rican watersheds after Hurricane Maria
13-Nov-2020 10:30 AM EST
Antibiotic resistance genes in three Puerto Rican watersheds after Hurricane Maria
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers monitored antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) in three Puerto Rican watersheds after Hurricane Maria, finding that the abundance and diversity of ARGs were highest downstream of WWTPs. They report their results in ACS’ Environmental Science & Technology.

Released: 16-Nov-2020 4:05 PM EST
Estudio descubre relación entre antibióticos antes de los 2 años de edad y problemas infantiles de salud
Mayo Clinic

En un estudio retrospectivo de casos, los investigadores de Mayo Clinic descubrieron una relación entre la administración de antibióticos en niños menores de 2 años y varias enfermedades o afecciones duraderas que oscilaban desde alergias a obesidad. Los resultados están en Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

12-Nov-2020 6:55 PM EST
Antibiotic Exposure in Children Under Age 2 Associated with Chronic Conditions
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Children under age 2 who take antibiotics are at greater risk for childhood-onset asthma, respiratory allergies, eczema, celiac disease, obesity and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, according to a paper written jointly by Mayo Clinic and Rutgers researchers. While previous studies have looked at the association of antibiotics with single diseases, this is the first to look at the association across many diseases.

Released: 27-Oct-2020 10:45 AM EDT
Drug resistance linked to antibiotic use and patient transfers in hospitals
eLife

Understanding the role of antibiotic use patterns and patient transfers in the emergence of drug-resistant microbes is essential to crafting effective prevention strategies, suggests a study published today in eLife.

Newswise: Inexpensive and Rapid Testing of Drugs for Resistant Infections Possible
Released: 20-Oct-2020 11:30 AM EDT
Inexpensive and Rapid Testing of Drugs for Resistant Infections Possible
Penn State Materials Research Institute

A rapid and simple method for testing the efficacy of antibacterial drugs on infectious microbes has been developed and validated by a team of Penn State researchers.

Released: 16-Oct-2020 10:00 AM EDT
Calcium bursts kill drug-resistant tumor cells
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in ACS’ Nano Letters have developed nanoparticles that release bursts of calcium inside tumor cells, inhibiting drug pumps and reversing MDR.

Released: 14-Oct-2020 9:30 AM EDT
Researchers Awarded Over $11 Million to Study Multi-Drug Resistant Infection Factors
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A study aimed at better understanding why some critically ill patients develop multidrug-resistant infections is underway by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The multi-institution study will enroll patients at Memorial Hermann Hospital-Texas Medical Center and The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Released: 12-Oct-2020 4:45 PM EDT
Penn Medicine Scientists Engineer Bacteria-Killing Molecules from Wasp Venom
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A team led by Penn Medicine has engineered powerful new antimicrobial molecules from toxic proteins found in wasp venom. The team hopes to develop the molecules into new bacteria-killing drugs, an important advancement considering increasing numbers of antibiotic-resistant bacteria which can cause illness such as sepsis and tuberculosis.

Newswise: UCLA researchers’ efforts to combat melanoma gets $13M boost from NIH
Released: 28-Sep-2020 11:25 AM EDT
UCLA researchers’ efforts to combat melanoma gets $13M boost from NIH
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA researchers have received a $13 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to find new ways to overcome melanoma resistance to some of the most promising targeted therapies and immunotherapies.

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Released: 24-Sep-2020 11:30 AM EDT
Genome of Alexander Fleming's original penicillin-producing mould sequenced
Imperial College London

Researchers have sequenced the genome of Alexander Fleming's penicillin mould for the first time and compared it to later versions.

Newswise: Tufts center for antimicrobial resistance renamed for Stuart B. Levy
Released: 22-Sep-2020 8:30 AM EDT
Tufts center for antimicrobial resistance renamed for Stuart B. Levy
Tufts University

The Center for Integrated Management of Antimicrobial Resistance, a collaborative effort supported by Tufts University and Tufts Medical Center, has been renamed the Stuart B. Levy Center for Integrated Management of Antimicrobial Resistance, to honor the pioneering antibiotic-resistance researcher.

Newswise: Building bridges: PARP enzymes bring broken DNA together
Released: 16-Sep-2020 11:00 AM EDT
Building bridges: PARP enzymes bring broken DNA together
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude researchers capture the structure of PARP enzymes at work, leading to a new understanding of DNA repair that may aid cancer treatments targeting the process.

Released: 11-Sep-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Poor home hygiene contributing to antibiotic resistance, warn global hygiene experts
SPINK HEALTH

According to the Global Hygiene Council's (GHC) public health experts, following a risk-based approach to home hygiene is essential to help curb the growing threat of antibiotic resistance.

Newswise: Too many COVID-19 patients get unneeded “just in case” antibiotics
Released: 26-Aug-2020 8:20 AM EDT
Too many COVID-19 patients get unneeded “just in case” antibiotics
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

More than half of patients hospitalized with suspected COVID-19 in Michigan during the state’s peak months received antibiotics soon after they arrive, just in case they had a bacterial infection in addition to the virus, a new study shows. But testing soon showed that 96.5% of them only had the coronavirus, which antibiotics don’t affect.

Newswise: Seizures During Menstrual Cycle Linked to Drug-Resistant Epilepsy
Released: 26-Aug-2020 6:00 AM EDT
Seizures During Menstrual Cycle Linked to Drug-Resistant Epilepsy
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

More frequent seizures during the menstrual cycle in women with genetic generalized epilepsy have been linked for the first time to drug-resistant epilepsy, when anti-seizure medications don’t work, according to a Rutgers coauthored study that may help lead to tailored treatments. Women with a form of genetic generalized epilepsy called catamenial epilepsy – when seizure frequency increases during their menstrual cycle – were nearly four times more likely to have drug-resistant epilepsy than women who experience no changes in frequency, according to the study in the journal Neurology. This association was found in two independent samples.

Released: 25-Aug-2020 2:45 PM EDT
Treating COVID-19 could lead to increased antimicrobial resistance
University of Plymouth

The use of antibiotics in people with COVID-19 could result in increased resistance to the drugs' benefits among the wider population, a new study suggests.

Released: 24-Aug-2020 12:20 PM EDT
Frequent use of antimicrobial drugs in early life shifts bacterial profiles in saliva
University of Helsinki

The human microbiota plays an important role in health and well-being by assisting in digestion, producing nutrients, resisting invading pathogens and regulating metabolism and the immune system.

Released: 21-Aug-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Long-acting, Injectable Drug Could Strengthen Efforts to Prevent, Treat HIV
University of Utah Health

Scientists have developed an injectable drug that blocks HIV from entering cells. They say the new drug potentially offers long-lasting protection from the infection with fewer side effects.

Released: 14-Aug-2020 4:05 PM EDT
Poor hygiene is significant risk for antimicrobial-resistant bacteria colonization
Washington State University

Scientists have found clear indicators for how the interaction of poor hygiene and antibiotic use contribute to the colonization of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) bacteria in humans, a problem that contributes to hundreds of thousands of deaths annually.

10-Aug-2020 3:25 PM EDT
MS Drug May be Used to Inhibit HIV Infection and Reduce Latent Reservoir
George Washington University

A multiple sclerosis drug may be used to block HIV infection and reduce the latent reservoir, according to research published in PLOS Pathogens by a team at the RGeorge Washington University.

Released: 13-Aug-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Pollution linked to antibiotic resistance
University of Georgia

Antibiotic resistance is an increasing health problem, but new research suggests it is not only caused by the overuse of antibiotics. It’s also caused by pollution.

Newswise: A wound dressing that kills bacteria
Released: 11-Aug-2020 6:55 AM EDT
A wound dressing that kills bacteria
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

In order to combat bacterial wound infections, Empa researchers have developed cellulose membranes equipped with antimicrobial peptides. Initial results show: The skin-friendly membranes made of plant-based materials kill bacteria very efficiently.

Released: 7-Aug-2020 8:05 PM EDT
Penn Medicine-Led Research Suggests Greater Access to Specific HIV and Tuberculosis Medications is Needed Worldwide
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A specific combination of HIV and TB treatments, difficult to obtain in certain parts of the world, decreased mortality risk for patients with HIV and multidrug-resistant TB

Newswise: Test accurately IDs people whose gonorrhea can be cured with simple oral antibiotic
4-Aug-2020 7:10 PM EDT
Test accurately IDs people whose gonorrhea can be cured with simple oral antibiotic
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A test designed by UCLA researchers can pinpoint which people with gonorrhea will respond successfully to the inexpensive oral antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which had previously been sidelined over concerns the bacterium that causes the infection was becoming resistant to it.

Newswise: Scientists Develop New Models to Accelerate Progress in Preventing Drug Resistance in Lung and Pancreas Cancers
Released: 4-Aug-2020 1:05 PM EDT
Scientists Develop New Models to Accelerate Progress in Preventing Drug Resistance in Lung and Pancreas Cancers
Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah

Scientists at Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah report today the development of new models to study molecular characteristics of tumors of the lung and pancreas that are driven by mutations in a gene named NTRK1. The findings were published today in the journal Cell Reports.

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27-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
Medieval medicine remedy could provide new treatment for modern day infections
University of Warwick

To fight antibiotic resistance more antimicrobials are needed to treat bacterial biofilms, which protect an infection from antibiotics


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