Feature Channels: Immunology

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Newswise: ‘Hard to Lose’ Mutations in Tumors May Predict Response to Immunotherapy
25-Jan-2023 9:15 AM EST
‘Hard to Lose’ Mutations in Tumors May Predict Response to Immunotherapy
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Investigators at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy have found that a subset of mutations within the overall TMB, termed “persistent mutations,” are less likely to be edited out as cancer evolves, rendering tumors continuously visible to the immune system and predisposing them to respond to immunotherapy.

Newswise: Keys to Making Immunotherapy Work Against Pancreatic Cancer Found in Tumor Microenvironment
Released: 26-Jan-2023 10:00 AM EST
Keys to Making Immunotherapy Work Against Pancreatic Cancer Found in Tumor Microenvironment
Johns Hopkins Medicine

A new study that analyzed the tumor microenvironment of pancreatic cancer revealed the cause of tumor cell resistance to immunotherapy and resulted in new treatment strategies.

Released: 25-Jan-2023 4:55 PM EST
Corona vaccine based on new technology tested in clinical study
Radboud University Medical Centre Nijmegen

A new COVID-19 vaccine based on a different platform than current vaccines on the market has been tested in humans for the first time by researchers at Radboud university medical center.

Newswise: Michael Criscuolo joins The Wistar Institute as Vice President of Development
Released: 24-Jan-2023 1:45 PM EST
Michael Criscuolo joins The Wistar Institute as Vice President of Development
Wistar Institute

The Wistar Institute, which has recently launched a $75 million programmatic campaign investing in biomedical advances, announces the appointment of Michael Criscuolo as Vice President of Development.

Newswise: Female lymphoma patient's afternoon chemotherapy decreases mortality
Released: 24-Jan-2023 1:00 PM EST
Female lymphoma patient's afternoon chemotherapy decreases mortality
Institute for Basic Science

Female lymphoma patients undergoing the morning chemotherapy treatment show a lower survival probability than those undergoing the afternoon treatment.

Newswise: Want More Than Romance This Valentine’s Day? Halt Spring Allergy Symptoms Before They Start
Released: 24-Jan-2023 8:00 AM EST
Want More Than Romance This Valentine’s Day? Halt Spring Allergy Symptoms Before They Start
American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI)

Spring allergy symptoms will start to appear soon in parts of the country. Many allergists advise their patients to set a reminder for Valentine’s Day to start taking allergy medications.

Newswise: Study reveals new genetic disorder that causes susceptibility to opportunistic infections
Released: 23-Jan-2023 2:50 PM EST
Study reveals new genetic disorder that causes susceptibility to opportunistic infections
Vanderbilt University Medical Center

An international consortium co-led by Vanderbilt University Medical Center immunogeneticist Rubén Martínez-Barricarte, PhD, has discovered a new genetic disorder that causes immunodeficiency and profound susceptibility to opportunistic infections including a life-threatening fungal pneumonia. The discovery, reported Jan. 20 in the journal Science Immunology, will help identify people who carry this in-born error of immunity (IEI).

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This news release is embargoed until 23-Jan-2023 11:00 AM EST Released to reporters: 23-Jan-2023 9:30 AM EST

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Released: 21-Jan-2023 10:05 AM EST
Immunotherapy with two novel drugs shows activity in colorectal cancer
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

A combination of two next-generation immunotherapy drugs has shown promising clinical activity in treating patients with refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, a disease which has not previously responded well to immunotherapies, according to a Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researcher.

Newswise:Video Embedded surviving-cancer-and-cooking-for-health
VIDEO
Released: 20-Jan-2023 1:10 PM EST
Surviving Cancer and Cooking for Health
Cedars-Sinai

In a brightly lit kitchen one recent afternoon, cancer survivors Patricia Rhodes and Evette Knight were part of a group gathered around a convection burner and a sauté pan filled with mushrooms. Cancer dietitian Meghan Laszlo, RD, explained why they shouldn’t stir quite yet. “We’re going to try our best to leave them alone so that they brown,” she said.

Newswise: Wistar Institute HIV Researchers Win Grant to Explore Genetically Engineered Natural Killer Cells as HIV Therapy
Released: 19-Jan-2023 2:35 PM EST
Wistar Institute HIV Researchers Win Grant to Explore Genetically Engineered Natural Killer Cells as HIV Therapy
Wistar Institute

amfAR, The Foundation for AIDS Research, has awarded Luis J. Montaner, D.V.M., D.Phil., in collaboration with Mohamed Abdel-Mohsen, Ph.D., a Target Grant for $397,663 over two years.

Newswise: An Unprecedented Look at Colorectal Cancer
13-Jan-2023 3:20 PM EST
An Unprecedented Look at Colorectal Cancer
Harvard Medical School

Researchers are building detailed maps of colorectal cancer to better understand the dynamics of the disease

Released: 19-Jan-2023 10:05 AM EST
Certain gene signaling rewires tumors after immunotherapy
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have found a mechanism for why a subset of patients’ tumors grow, rather than shrink, when faced with immunotherapy.

Newswise: Commonly used antiretroviral drugs used to treat HIV and hepatitis B reduce immune cells’ energy production
Released: 18-Jan-2023 7:45 PM EST
Commonly used antiretroviral drugs used to treat HIV and hepatitis B reduce immune cells’ energy production
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

New UCLA-led research suggests that antiretroviral drugs called TAF and TDF directly reduce energy production by mitochondria, structures inside cells that generate the power that cells use to function. Both drugs led to reduced cellular oxygen consumption rates, a measure of the ability of the mitochondria to produce energy, compared with controls.

Released: 18-Jan-2023 1:00 PM EST
People with HIV Experience Higher Rates of Inflammation and Immune Activity During Pregnancy
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

People with HIV have a higher chance of having chronic systemic inflammation during pregnancy, according to a Rutgers study.

Released: 18-Jan-2023 8:00 AM EST
Negative marital communications leave literal, figurative wounds
Ohio State University

A tendency for one or both spouses to avoid or withdraw from tough conversations could set up married couples for emotional distress, bad feelings about their relationship, chronic inflammation and lowered immune function, new research suggests.

   
Newswise: Durable SARS-CoV-2 antibodies bind to two viral targets at once
Released: 17-Jan-2023 4:20 PM EST
Durable SARS-CoV-2 antibodies bind to two viral targets at once
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

A new study led by scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) shows how ideal antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 hit their marks. Now scientists are looking at how we might harness their power in new antibody therapeutics and even more effective COVID-19 vaccines.

   
Newswise: Increasing Robo4 expression may help with infections
Released: 17-Jan-2023 1:10 PM EST
Increasing Robo4 expression may help with infections
Osaka University

The researchers screened a library of drugs using a mouse endothelial cell line to identify pathways that are involved in the regulation of Robo4 and found that two competitive SMAD signaling pathways appear to regulate Robo4 expression. When the researchers treated LPS-injected mice with a drug that inhibits ALK1-SMAD signaling, they observed increased Robo4 expression, decreased vascular permeability, and reduced mortality.

Released: 17-Jan-2023 12:45 PM EST
Mucosal antibodies in the airways provide durable protection against SARS-CoV-2
Karolinska Institute

High levels of mucosal IgA antibodies in the airways protect against SARS-CoV-2 infection for at least eight months. Omicron infection generates durable mucosal antibodies, reducing the risk of re-infection.

Released: 17-Jan-2023 8:00 AM EST
Improving Adult Immunization Rates the Focus of Partnership Between ATS and Three Health Systems Across the U.S.
American Thoracic Society (ATS)

NEW YORK, NY – Jan. 17, 2023 – The American Thoracic Society is starting the new year poised to improve vaccination rates with three health system partners: University of Arizona/ Banner Health; West Virginia University Hospitals, Inc.; and San Francisco Health Network/ University of California.

Released: 17-Jan-2023 8:00 AM EST
MD Anderson’s Jennifer Wargo receives TAMEST O’Donnell Award for pioneering microbiome research
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Jennifer Wargo, M.D., professor of Surgical Oncology and Genomic Medicine at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, has received a 2023 Edith and Peter O’Donnell Award in Medicine from the Texas Academy of Medicine, Engineering, Science and Technology (TAMEST) for her contributions to the understanding of how the gut microbiome influences responses to immunotherapy and other cancer treatments.

Newswise: Using paleogenomics to elucidate 10,000 years of immune system evolution
Released: 13-Jan-2023 5:40 PM EST
Using paleogenomics to elucidate 10,000 years of immune system evolution
Institut Pasteur

Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, Université Paris Cité, the CNRS and the Collège de France have used paleogenomics to trace 10,000 years of human immune system evolution.

   
11-Jan-2023 1:15 PM EST
Gut bacteria affect brain health, mouse study shows
Washington University in St. Louis

Gut bacteria can influence brain health, according to a study of mice genetically predisposed to develop Alzheimer’s-like brain damage. The study, by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, indicates that gut bacteria produce compounds that influence the behavior of immune cells, including ones in the brain that can cause neurodegeneration. The findings suggest a new approach to treating Alzheimer’s and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Released: 12-Jan-2023 1:35 PM EST
Ask the expert: What are nanomedicines?
Michigan State University

Morteza Mahmoudi, an assistant professor in MSU’s Department of Radiology, explains why addressing disagreements with stronger standards will help ensure future nanomedicines are safe, effective and successful.

Newswise: LJI scientists solve the mystery of why OGT enzyme is critical for cell survival
Released: 12-Jan-2023 1:10 PM EST
LJI scientists solve the mystery of why OGT enzyme is critical for cell survival
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

LA JOLLA, CA — Researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have at last uncovered how an enzyme called O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT) keeps cells healthy. Their findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Sciences, reveals a key aspect of cellular biology and may lead to important medical advances.

   
Newswise: 1671790448970.jpg
11-Jan-2023 11:05 PM EST
Scientists develop novel mRNA delivery method using extracellular vesicles
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

A team of researchers led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has developed a novel delivery system for messenger RNA (mRNA) using extracellular vesicles (EVs). The new technique has the potential to overcome many of the delivery hurdles faced by other promising mRNA therapies.

10-Jan-2023 9:35 AM EST
Scientists find more evidence that breast milk of those vaccinated against COVID-19 may protect infants
University of Florida

Findings from a newly published study provide further evidence suggesting that the breast milk of those vaccinated against COVID-19 may help protect babies from the illness

Newswise: Newly discovered surface structures may affect immune function
Released: 11-Jan-2023 7:10 PM EST
Newly discovered surface structures may affect immune function
University of Freiburg

Using new microscopic methods in combination with machine learning-based image analysis, researchers from Freiburg have discovered new structures on the surface of living B cells that affect the distribution and possibly the function of their antigen receptors.

Newswise: Surgery First for Colon Cancer? Not So Fast, According to New Study in JNCCN
10-Jan-2023 9:00 AM EST
Surgery First for Colon Cancer? Not So Fast, According to New Study in JNCCN
National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®)

New research in JNCCN finds that immunotherapy from immune checkpoint (PD-1) inhibitors prior to surgery was strikingly effective for patients with localized mismatch repair-deficient or microsatellite instability-high (dMMR/MSI-H) colorectal cancer (CRC).

11-Jan-2023 9:35 AM EST
CAR T Cell Therapy May Eliminate Tumor Cells Missed by Surgery
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

CAR T cell therapy may enhance the effectiveness of surgery for solid tumors, according to a preclinical study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Released: 11-Jan-2023 12:00 PM EST
MD Anderson Research Highlights for January 11, 2023
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recent basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts.

   
Released: 11-Jan-2023 11:40 AM EST
COVID-19: New research about how antibodies are formed
Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

A team of researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) and Universitätsklinikum Erlangen has gained new insights into the maturation of SARS-CoV-specific antibodies after multiple vaccinations with the mRNA vaccine Comirnaty.

Released: 10-Jan-2023 5:10 PM EST
Unraveling key determinant of successful therapeutic vaccination against chronic hepatitis B
Elsevier

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections remain a major global health problem – according to the World Health Organization (WHO) there are around 300 million HBV carriers worldwide. Current treatments rarely succeed in curing the infection.

Newswise: Analysis: A Longer View on COVID-19 Antibodies
Released: 10-Jan-2023 3:00 PM EST
Analysis: A Longer View on COVID-19 Antibodies
Cedars-Sinai

A new analysis by Cedars-Sinai investigators is furthering the scientific community’s understanding of COVID-19 immunity by showing that similar levels of COVID-19 antibodies are reached over an extended period of time in different population groups.

Newswise: RUDN neurosurgeons studied the immune response to multiple injuries
Released: 10-Jan-2023 4:05 AM EST
RUDN neurosurgeons studied the immune response to multiple injuries
Russian Foundation for Basic Research

RUDN neurosurgeons studied the immune response in polytrauma - multiple serious traumatic lesions. The results will help specialists understand the features of the recovery period and adjust the treatment.

Released: 9-Jan-2023 5:35 PM EST
B.C. sea sponge has COVID-blocking powers
University of British Columbia

UBC researchers have identified three compounds that prevent COVID-19 infection in human cells, derived from natural sources including a B.C. sea sponge.

Released: 9-Jan-2023 12:50 PM EST
Surge of SARS-CoV-2 Variants in China and USA Further Emphasizes Need for Surveillance, Preparedness, and International Collaborations
Global Virus Network

Christian Bréchot, MD, PhD, President of the Global Virus Network (GVN), Associate Vice President for International Partnerships and Innovation at the University of South Florida and Professor of the Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Internal Medicine at USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the GVN Southeast U.S. Regional Headquarters today issued a statement on the surge of SARS-CoV-2.

Newswise: Novel T cell receptor therapy shows early anti-tumor activity
6-Jan-2023 2:35 PM EST
Novel T cell receptor therapy shows early anti-tumor activity
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

Afamitresgene autoleucel (afami-cel; formerly ADP-A2M4), an adoptive T cell receptor (TCR) therapy targeting the MAGE-A4 cancer antigen, achieved clinically significant results for patients with multiple solid tumor types in a Phase I clinical trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

Released: 6-Jan-2023 5:45 PM EST
More than two billion are infected with this disease; Vitamin D can help
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

Sarcomas are cancer tumours found in e.g. the bones, muscles or fatty tissue. It is a rare type of cancer seen in only one per cent of cancer patients. It is complex and difficult to treat.

Released: 6-Jan-2023 12:55 PM EST
Vaccine and prior SARS-CoV-2 infection confer long-lasting protection against omicron BA.5
Instituto de Medicina Molecular

A new study led by Luís Graça, group leader at the Instituto de Medicina Molecular João Lobo Antunes (iMM, Lisbon) and full professor at the Medical School of the University of Lisbon, and Manuel Carmo Gomes, associate professor with aggregation at the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon (Ciências ULisboa), both members of the Direção Geral de Saúde (DGS) Technical Committee for Vaccination against COVID-19 (CTVC), and published today in the scientific journal Lancet Infectious Diseases*, shows that the protection conferred by hybrid immunity against the SARS-CoV-2 subvariant omicron BA.5, obtained by the infection of vaccinated people, lasts for at least eight months after the first infection.

Newswise: Ludwig Cancer Research Study Uncovers Novel Aspect of Tumor Evolution and Potential Targets for Therapy
Released: 5-Jan-2023 12:35 PM EST
Ludwig Cancer Research Study Uncovers Novel Aspect of Tumor Evolution and Potential Targets for Therapy
Ludwig Cancer Research

A Ludwig Cancer Research study has discovered that the immune system’s surveillance of cancer can itself induce metabolic adaptations in the cells of early-stage tumors that simultaneously promote their growth and equip them to suppress lethal immune responses.

Newswise: Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center Welcomes New Faculty
Released: 5-Jan-2023 10:05 AM EST
Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center Welcomes New Faculty
Cedars-Sinai

Peter Heeger, MD, Justin Steggerda, MD, Hirsh Trivedi, MD, and Lorenzo Zaffiri, MD, PhD, have all recently joined the Cedars-Sinai Comprehensive Transplant Center.

Released: 4-Jan-2023 7:40 PM EST
Does COVID change the body’s response to other threats? Depends on your sex
Yale University

The long-term effects of infection on the immune system have long intrigued John Tsang, a Yale immunobiologist. After the body has faced down a pathogen, does the immune system return to the previous baseline? Or does a single infection change it in ways that alter how it will respond not only to a familiar virus but also to the next new viral or bacterial threat it faces?

Newswise: Study Uncovers Triple Immunotherapy Combination as Potential Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer
Released: 3-Jan-2023 4:35 PM EST
Study Uncovers Triple Immunotherapy Combination as Potential Treatment for Pancreatic Cancer
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Researchers from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the state’s leading cancer program and only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, together with RWJBarnabas Health, in collaboration with investigators from MD Anderson Cancer Center, discovered a novel triple immunotherapy combination, targeting checkpoints on both T cells and myeloid suppressor cells, that dramatically improved anti-tumor responses by reprogramming the tumor microenvironment in preclinical models of PDAC.

Newswise: December Research Highlights
Released: 29-Dec-2022 5:45 PM EST
December Research Highlights
Cedars-Sinai

A roundup of the latest medical discoveries and faculty news at Cedars-Sinai.

Newswise: Tissue-Specific Immunity May Be the Future, if We Can First Learn its Rules
Released: 28-Dec-2022 11:30 AM EST
Tissue-Specific Immunity May Be the Future, if We Can First Learn its Rules
University of California San Diego

UC San Diego study reveals critical insights into the complex biology of tissue-specific T cells, paving the way for a new branch of precision therapeutics in immunity, autoimmunity, and cancer.

Newswise: UT Southwestern rheumatologist recommends patients receive pneumococcal vaccine
Released: 28-Dec-2022 11:30 AM EST
UT Southwestern rheumatologist recommends patients receive pneumococcal vaccine
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Patients with rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and other rheumatic conditions are more at risk for complications and death from pneumonia, meningitis, and other bacterial infections, yet most have not been vaccinated against infection.


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