Feature Channels: Immunology

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Newswise: Public
Released: 4-Aug-2021 2:05 PM EDT
A Study Reveals What Triggers Lung Damage During COVID-19
The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

A KAIST immunology research team found that a specific subtype of macrophages that originated from blood monocytes plays a key role in the hyper-inflammatory response in SARS-CoV-2 infected lungs, by performing single-cell RNA sequencing of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cells.

Newswise: Newly Approved Lupus Drug Based on Discoveries Made in HSS Lab
Released: 2-Aug-2021 3:00 PM EDT
Newly Approved Lupus Drug Based on Discoveries Made in HSS Lab
Hospital for Special Surgery

The US Food and Drug Administration approved the drug anifrolumab (Saphnelo) on August 2, 2021 for the treatment of adult patients with moderate to severe systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are receiving standard therapy. Much of the groundwork for the development of this drug was done in laboratories at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in the early 2000s.

30-Jul-2021 10:25 AM EDT
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia Researchers Identify Approach for Potential Nontypeable Haemophilus Influenzae Vaccine
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Scientists at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified two proteins that could be used for a potential vaccine against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Working in a mouse model, the investigators found that administering two bacterial adhesive proteins that play a key role in helping the bacteria to latch on to respiratory cells and initiate respiratory tract infection stimulated protective immunity against diverse NTHi strains, highlighting the vaccine potential.

Newswise: Gene Mutation Weakens Virus-Fighting Protein in the Gut Causing Rare Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Released: 30-Jul-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Gene Mutation Weakens Virus-Fighting Protein in the Gut Causing Rare Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers, in collaboration with national and international researchers, have identified a genetic mutation in a small number of children with a rare type of inflammatory bowel disease. The discovery of the mutation, which weakens the activity of a protein linked to how the immune system fights viruses in the gut, may help researchers pinpoint the cause of more common bowel diseases, investigators say.

Newswise: New Grant, National Fellowship for UA Little Rock Nanotechnology Researcher
Released: 29-Jul-2021 9:55 AM EDT
New Grant, National Fellowship for UA Little Rock Nanotechnology Researcher
University of Arkansas at Little Rock

Dr. K. Bao Vang-Dings, a nanotechnology researcher at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, has been named one of nine 2021-22 Public Policy Fellows by the American Association of Immunologists. Additionally, the Arkansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (INBRE) has awarded her a 2021 Summer Research Grant to support Vang-Dings’ cancer vaccine research.

Newswise: Public
Released: 28-Jul-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Highly Potent, Stable Nanobodies Stop SARS-CoV-2
Max Planck Society (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft)

Göttingen researchers have developed mini-antibodies that efficiently block the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and its dangerous new variants.

Newswise: Fighting Off Food Poisoning Depends on The Time Of Day
Released: 28-Jul-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Fighting Off Food Poisoning Depends on The Time Of Day
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – July 28, 2021 – The body’s ability to prevent food poisoning by producing a natural antimicrobial compound increases during the day, when exposure to noxious bacteria is most likely, a new study by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The findings, published online in Cell, could eventually lead to timed therapies and vaccination regimens designed to maximize this immune response.

Released: 28-Jul-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Geographic Differences in Gut Microbiota Boost Immunity
Cornell University

Gut reaction: Cornell researchers “humanized” mice with microbiota from three global populations and found that microbial differences alone can impact immune responses.

Released: 28-Jul-2021 12:15 PM EDT
One in Four Cancer Patients Lack Sufficient Immunity Against Measles and Mumps, Study Finds
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

One in four cancer patients lack sufficient immunity against measles and mumps, study finds

Released: 27-Jul-2021 12:35 PM EDT
T cell response not critical for immune memory to SARS-CoV-2 or recovery from COVID-19
American Society for Microbiology (ASM)

New research conducted in monkeys reveals that T cells are not critical for the recovery of primates from acute COVID-19 infections.

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Released: 26-Jul-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Why Do Some People Get Severe COVID-19? The Nose May Know
Boston Children's Hospital

The body's first encounter with SARS-CoV-2, the virus behind COVID-19, happens in the nose and throat, or nasopharynx.

Released: 26-Jul-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Early Antiviral Response in the Nose May Determine the Course of COVID-19
Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard

Researchers studied cells collected by nasal swabs at the moment of diagnosis for both mild and severe COVID-19 patients

26-Jul-2021 6:05 AM EDT
Penn Medicine Discovery Clarifies the Problem of T-Cell “Exhaustion”
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers have discovered a limitation of the immune system in battles against cancers or viruses: T cells remain programmed to stay exhausted even weeks after exposure to a virus ended. Scientists need to take this "T cell exhaustion” into account when devising immune-based therapies.

Newswise:Video Embedded covid-variants-and-a-surge-among-the-unvaccinated-live-expert-panel-for-july-23rd
VIDEO
Released: 26-Jul-2021 8:50 AM EDT
VIDEO AND TRANSCRIPT AVAILABLE: COVID Variants and a Surge Among the Unvaccinated: Live Expert Panel for July 23rd, 2021
Newswise

Panelists will discuss the threat posed by new COVID variants and continued vaccine hesitancy.

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Released: 23-Jul-2021 11:45 AM EDT
New Insights Into Immune Responses to Malaria
Walter & Eliza Hall Institute

Advanced technologies have been used to solve a long-standing mystery about why some people develop serious illness when they are infected with the malaria parasite, while others carry the infection asymptomatically.

Released: 23-Jul-2021 11:40 AM EDT
New 'Atlas' Charts How Antibodies Attack Spike Protein Variants
Brigham and Women’s Hospital

As the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 continues to evolve, immunologists and infectious diseases experts are eager to know whether new variants are resistant to the human antibodies that recognized initial versions of the virus.

Released: 22-Jul-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Cell-Analysis Technique Could Combat Tuberculosis
Cornell University

Researchers at Cornell have developed a way to analyze how individual immune cells react to the bacteria that cause tuberculosis. It could pave the way for new vaccine strategies and provide insights into fighting other infectious diseases.

Newswise: Structural Biology Provides Long-Sought Solution to Innate Immunity Puzzle
Released: 22-Jul-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Structural Biology Provides Long-Sought Solution to Innate Immunity Puzzle
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern researchers report the first structural confirmation that endogenous – or self-made – molecules can set off innate immunity in mammals via a pair of immune cell proteins called the TLR4−MD-2 receptor complex. The work has wide-ranging implications for finding ways to treat and possibly prevent autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and antiphospholipid syndrome.

Released: 22-Jul-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Cancer Research Institute Awards $28.5 Million in Grants and Fellowships to Support Basic and Clinical Research in Immunology and Cancer Immunotherapy
Cancer Research Institute

Cancer Research Institute announced grants and fellowships of $28.5 million to scientists advancing immunology and cancer immunotherapy research

Released: 22-Jul-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Cancer Research Institute Announces First Recipients of the New CRI Irvington Postdoctoral Fellowship to Promote Racial Diversity
Cancer Research Institute

Cancer Research Institute announces first recipients of new fellowship program designed to promote racial diversity and inclusion in immunology and tumor immunology

Newswise: Researchers Find Immune Component to Rare Neurodegenerative Disease
Released: 21-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Researchers Find Immune Component to Rare Neurodegenerative Disease
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern researchers have identified an immune protein tied to the rare neurodegenerative condition known as Niemann-Pick disease type C. The finding, made in mouse models and published online in Nature, could offer a powerful new therapeutic target for Niemann-Pick disease type C, a condition that was identified more than a century ago but still lacks effective treatments.

Released: 21-Jul-2021 2:10 PM EDT
SARS-CoV-2 variant B.1.617 gives the immune system a hard time
Deutsches Primatenzentrum

SARS-CoV-2 still poses major challenges to mankind. The frequent emergence of mutant forms makes the threat posed by the virus difficult to predict.

Released: 21-Jul-2021 8:10 AM EDT
Blocking How the Malaria Parasite Suppresses the Immune Response
Ohio State University

The parasites that cause severe malaria are well-known for the sinister ways they infect humans, but new research may lead to drugs that could block one of their most reliable weapons: interference with the immune response.

Newswise: C Is for Vitamin C—a Key Ingredient for Immune Cell Function
19-Jul-2021 3:30 PM EDT
C Is for Vitamin C—a Key Ingredient for Immune Cell Function
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Regulatory T cells (Tregs) help control inflammation and autoimmunity in the body. Unfortunately, it has proven difficult to find the right molecular ingredients to induce stable iTregs. A new study reports that Vitamin C and TET proteins can work together to give Tregs their life-saving power.

Released: 19-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Survey Shows Rise in Vaccine Hesitancy in Ghana
University of Southampton

Research led by the University of Southampton into the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine in Ghana, West Africa has concluded that vaccine hesitancy has seen a small, but significant increase over the last three months.

Released: 19-Jul-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Common COVID-19 Antibiotic No More Effective Than Placebo
University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

A UC San Francisco study has found that the antibiotic azithromycin was no more effective than a placebo in preventing symptoms of COVID-19 among non-hospitalized patients, and may increase their chance of hospitalization, despite widespread prescription of the antibiotic for the disease.

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Released: 19-Jul-2021 11:50 AM EDT
COVID-19 Antibodies Persist at Least Nine Months After Infection
Imperial College London

Testing of an entire Italian town shows antibody levels remain high nine months after SARS-CoV-2 infection, whether symptomatic or asymptomatic.

Newswise: Preparing T Cells for the Long Haul
15-Jul-2021 5:45 PM EDT
Preparing T Cells for the Long Haul
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

In a new Nature Immunology study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that T cells can be engineered to clear tumors without succumbing to T cell exhaustion.

Released: 15-Jul-2021 11:25 AM EDT
New Covid-19 Vaccine Candidate Provides Effective Option for Low- to Mid-Income Countries
Emory Health Sciences

A multidisciplinary team of researchers is the first to show combining yeast-expression technology and a novel adjuvant formulation to produce a COVID-19 vaccine candidate is effective against SARS-COV-2 and promises to be easy to produce at large scale and cost-effective, important aspects for vaccinating people worldwide, especially in low- to middle-income countries.

Newswise: Hopkins Med News Update
Released: 15-Jul-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Hopkins Med News Update
Johns Hopkins Medicine

NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE: - Johns Hopkins Medicine Celebrates Its Contributions to Keto Therapy as Diet Turns 100 - COVID-19 News: Can Dietary Supplements Help the Immune System Fight Coronavirus Infection? - Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Develop Physician Training to Prevent Gun Injuries, Deaths - COVID-19 News: Study Says Pandemic Impaired Reporting of Infectious Diseases - Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Create Treatment Guide for Neurodegenerative Disorders - Johns Hopkins Pediatrics Says, ‘Get Kids Required Vaccines Before Going Back to School’

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Released: 15-Jul-2021 10:30 AM EDT
A rapid method to quantify antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
Hokkaido University

Scientists have developed a rapid, highly accurate test to detect antibodies against the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in human serum, opening a new avenue for understanding the full extent of the pandemic and evaluating the effectiveness of vaccines.

Released: 14-Jul-2021 4:25 PM EDT
Vaccine Hesitancy In Young Adults May Hamper Herd Immunity
University of California, San Francisco (UCSF)

Vaccine skepticism among young adults may stall efforts to achieve herd immunity - a threshold in which approximately 80 percent of a population is vaccinated against the coronavirus.

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Released: 13-Jul-2021 2:05 PM EDT
One shot of the Sputnik V vaccine triggers strong antibody responses
Cell Press

A single dose of the Sputnik V vaccine may elicit significant antibody responses against SARS-CoV-2, finds a study published July 13 in the journal Cell Reports Medicine.

Released: 12-Jul-2021 5:00 AM EDT
MD Anderson and Hummingbird Bioscience Announce Strategic Research Collaboration to Advance Innovative Immunotherapies
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center

MD Anderson and Hummingbird Bioscience announced a multi-year strategic research collaboration to investigate HMBD-002, Hummingbird's VISTA antagonist antibody, as a novel immunotherapy for cancer.

Released: 7-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
New study shows mathematical models helped reduce the spread of COVID-19
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Colorado researchers have published new findings in Emerging Infectious Diseases that take a first look at the use of SARS-CoV-2 mathematical modeling to inform early statewide policies enacted to reduce the spread of the Coronavirus pandemic in Colorado.

Newswise: ‘Fortunate Accident’ May Yield Immunity Weapon Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
Released: 7-Jul-2021 2:30 PM EDT
‘Fortunate Accident’ May Yield Immunity Weapon Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria
Johns Hopkins Medicine

In what turned out to be one of the most important accidents of all time, Scottish bacteriologist Alexander Fleming returned to his laboratory after a vacation in 1928 to find a clear zone surrounding a piece of mold that had infiltrated a petri dish full of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), a common skin bacterium he was growing.

Newswise: Discovery Shows How Tuning the Immune System May Enhance Vaccines and Ease Disease
Released: 7-Jul-2021 12:35 PM EDT
Discovery Shows How Tuning the Immune System May Enhance Vaccines and Ease Disease
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

A metabolic control pathway that regulates T follicular helper cells offers targets for drugs to stimulate the adaptive immune response.

Newswise: Study Reveals How Our Immune System Reacts to COVID-19 Variants
Released: 6-Jul-2021 5:05 PM EDT
Study Reveals How Our Immune System Reacts to COVID-19 Variants
University of Sydney

Australian scientists researching how our immune system responds to COVID-19 have revealed that those infected by early variants in 2020 produced sustained antibodies, however, these antibodies are not as effective against contemporary variants of the virus.

Newswise: UT Southwestern Scientists Closing in on Map
 of The Mammalian Immune System
Released: 6-Jul-2021 5:00 PM EDT
UT Southwestern Scientists Closing in on Map of The Mammalian Immune System
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Using artificial intelligence, UT Southwestern scientists have identified thousands of genetic mutations likely to affect the immune system in mice. The work is part of one Nobel laureate’s quest to find virtually all such variations in mammals.

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Released: 6-Jul-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Study Shows Laboratory Developed Protein Spikes Consistent with COVID-19 Virus
University of Southampton

A new international study has found that the key properties of the spikes of SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID-19 are consistent with those of several laboratory-developed protein spikes, designed to mimic the infectious virus.

Released: 6-Jul-2021 3:35 PM EDT
mRNA Vaccines Slash Risk of COVID-19 Infection by 91 Percent in Fully Vaccinated People
University of Utah Health

People who receive mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are up to 91 percent less likely to develop the disease than those who are unvaccinated, according to a new nationwide study of eight sites, including Salt Lake City. For those few vaccinated people who do still get an infection, or “breakthrough” cases, the study suggests that vaccines reduce the severity of COVID-19 symptoms and shorten its duration.

Released: 1-Jul-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Vaccines grown in eggs induce antibody response against an egg-associated glycan
University of Chicago Medical Center

Researchers have found that viral vaccines grown in eggs, such as the H1N1 flu vaccine, produce an antibody response against a sugar molecule found in eggs, which could have implications for the effectiveness of these vaccines.

Newswise: Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines prime T cells to fight SARS-CoV-2 variants
Released: 1-Jul-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines prime T cells to fight SARS-CoV-2 variants
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have found that T cells from people who have recovered from COVID-19 or received the Moderna or Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines are still able to recognize several concerning SARS-CoV-2 variants.

Newswise: For Transplant Patients, COVID-19 Vaccination Presents a Different Uncertainty
Released: 1-Jul-2021 2:40 PM EDT
For Transplant Patients, COVID-19 Vaccination Presents a Different Uncertainty
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at UC San Diego Health have launched a pair of clinical trials to study the immune response of COVID-19 vaccinated transplant recipients of bone marrow and solid organs, such as the heart, lung, liver and kidney.

Newswise: Studying how microbiome affects immunity could improve vaccine effectiveness
Released: 29-Jun-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Studying how microbiome affects immunity could improve vaccine effectiveness
Iowa State University

A new grant will help Iowa State University researchers figure out how the microbiome, or all the microorganisms that live inside and on human systems, affects immunity and the effectiveness of vaccines. Not everyone responds to vaccines in identical ways, and the researchers will search for ways humans can adjust their microbiomes to optimize vaccine response.

Newswise: Cell-Based Immunotherapy Shows Promise Against Melanoma
28-Jun-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Cell-Based Immunotherapy Shows Promise Against Melanoma
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown in preclinical studies conducted in mice and human cells that a type immunotherapy based on natural killer cells could be effective against solid tumors, starting with melanoma, a type of skin cancer that can be deadly if not caught early.

Newswise: Carl F. Ware receives ICIS Honorary Lifetime Membership Award
Released: 28-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Carl F. Ware receives ICIS Honorary Lifetime Membership Award
Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute

Carl F. Ware, Ph.D., director of the Inflammatory Diseases Center at Sanford Burhnam Prebys, has received the 2021 International Cytokine & Interferon Society Honorary Lifetime Membership Award.

Newswise: Hard-working Enzyme Keeps Immune Cells in Line
Released: 25-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Hard-working Enzyme Keeps Immune Cells in Line
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have shed light on a process in immune cells that may explain why some people develop cardiovascular diseases. Their research, published recently in Genome Biology, shows the key role that TET enzymes play in keeping immune cells on a healthy track as they mature. The scientists found that other enzymes do play a role in this process—but TET enzymes do the heavy lifting.


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