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Released: 21-Jun-2021 5:55 PM EDT
UCI-led study finds that cancer immunotherapy may self-limit its efficacy
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 21, 2021 — Cancer immunotherapy involving drugs that inhibit CTLA-4 also activates an unwanted response that may self-limit its efficacy in fighting tumors, according to a new study led by Francesco Marangoni, Ph.D., assistant professor of physiology & biophysics and member of the Institute for Immunology at the University of California, Irvine.

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Released: 21-Jun-2021 4:10 PM EDT
Study examines how breast implant surfaces affect immune response
Rice University

Rice University bioengineers collaborated on a six-year study that systematically analyzed how the surface architecture of breast implants influences the development of adverse effects, including an unusual type of lymphoma.

Newswise: Study Suggests that Smoother Silicone Breast Implants Reduce Severity of Immune System Reactions
Released: 21-Jun-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Study Suggests that Smoother Silicone Breast Implants Reduce Severity of Immune System Reactions
Johns Hopkins Medicine

According to researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Rice University in Houston, silicone breast implants with a smoother surface design have less risk of producing inflammation and other immune system reactions than those with more roughly textured coatings. Results of the experiments using mice, rabbits and samples of human breast tissue advance knowledge of how the body responds to such implants, providing new information to physicians and affirming the benefits of certain smoother surfaces, the researchers say.

Newswise: Trojan horses and tunneling nanotubes: Ebola virus research at Texas Biomed gets NIH funding boost
Released: 17-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Trojan horses and tunneling nanotubes: Ebola virus research at Texas Biomed gets NIH funding boost
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Scientists have a general idea of how viruses invade and spread in the body, but the precise mechanisms are actually not well understood, especially when it comes to Ebola virus. Olena Shtanko, Ph.D., a Staff Scientist at the Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed), has received more than $1 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to explore different aspects of Ebola virus infection.

Released: 16-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Two COVID-19 Vaccines Show Safety, Strong Immunity in Infant Model
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

The Moderna mRNA vaccine and a protein-based vaccine candidate elicited durable neutralizing antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2 in pre-clinical research. There were no adverse effects.

Released: 15-Jun-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Common cold combats COVID-19
Yale University

Exposure to the rhinovirus, the most frequent cause of the common cold, can protect against infection by the virus which causes COVID-19, Yale researchers have found.

Newswise: AI Predicts How Patients with Viral Infections, Including COVID-19, Will Fare
9-Jun-2021 6:05 PM EDT
AI Predicts How Patients with Viral Infections, Including COVID-19, Will Fare
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered gene expression patterns associated with pandemic viral infections, providing a map to help define patients’ immune responses, measure disease severity, predict outcomes and test therapies — for current and future pandemics.

Newswise: Ludwig Cancer Research Study Shows How Certain Macrophages Dampen Anti-Tumor Immunity
10-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Ludwig Cancer Research Study Shows How Certain Macrophages Dampen Anti-Tumor Immunity
Ludwig Cancer Research

A Ludwig Cancer Research study adds to growing evidence that immune cells known as macrophages inhabiting the body cavities that house our vital organs can aid tumor growth by distracting the immune system’s cancer-killing CD8+ T cells. Reported in the current issue of Cancer Cell and led by Ludwig investigators Taha Merghoub and Jedd Wolchok at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) and Charles Rudin of MSK, the study shows that cavity-resident macrophages express high levels of Tim-4, a receptor for phosphatidylserine (PS), a molecule that they surprisingly found on the surface of highly activated, cytotoxic and proliferative CD8+ T-cells.

9-Jun-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Could Neutrophils be the Secret to Cancer’s Achilles’ Heel?
University of Chicago Medical Center

A study published in the June 10, 2021 issue of Cell describes a remarkable new mechanism by which the body’s own immune system can eliminate cancer cells without damaging host cells. The findings have the potential to develop first-in-class medicines that are designed to be selective for cancer cells and non-toxic to normal cells and tissues.

Newswise: Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Generates Robust Immune Responses Against COVID-19 Variants
Released: 9-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Generates Robust Immune Responses Against COVID-19 Variants
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a new study published in Nature, Dan Barouch, MD, PhD, Director of BIDMC's Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, and colleagues report on the antibody and cellular immune responses generated by the Ad26.COV2.S vaccine against the original viral strain and against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. The team found that this vaccine induced immune responses against all the viral variants.

Newswise: Understanding gut inflammation may hold clues to mitigating Parkinson’s onset
Released: 8-Jun-2021 3:20 PM EDT
Understanding gut inflammation may hold clues to mitigating Parkinson’s onset
Van Andel Institute

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (JUNE 8, 2021) — Chronic inflammation in the gut may propel processes in the body that give rise to Parkinson’s disease, according to a study by scientists at Van Andel Institute and Roche.

Newswise: First in the World! Chulalongkorn Hospital Successfully Treats a Breast Cancer Patient with Immunotherapy
Released: 8-Jun-2021 8:55 AM EDT
First in the World! Chulalongkorn Hospital Successfully Treats a Breast Cancer Patient with Immunotherapy
Chulalongkorn University

Queen Sirikit Center for Breast Cancer, King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Thai Red Cross Society (Chulalongkorn Hospital) has become the world’s first institution to have successfully used immunotherapy to treat a breast cancer patient who is now in complete remission with minimal side effects and uplifted quality of life.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Protein identified as new therapeutic anti-viral target for COVID-19
King's College London

New research identified a novel interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and the galectin-3-binding protein (LGALS3BP) which could be a new therapeutic anti-viral target.

Newswise: Collaboration controls killers
Released: 4-Jun-2021 12:20 PM EDT
Collaboration controls killers
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude immunologists are researching how effector and killer T cells can be controlled to destroy cancer cells that resist treatment.

Released: 4-Jun-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Understanding the skin’s defense system
Michigan State University

It can be easy to forget that the human skin is an organ. It’s also the largest one and it’s exposed, charged with keeping our inner biology safe from the perils of the outside world. But Michigan State University’s Sangbum Park is someone who never takes skin or its biological functions for granted. He’s studying skin at the cellular level to better understand it and help us support it when it’s fighting injury, infection or disease.

Newswise: Studies reveal skull as unexpected source of brain immunity
2-Jun-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Studies reveal skull as unexpected source of brain immunity
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that the immune cells that protect the brain and spinal cord come primarily from the skull. The finding opens up the possibility of developing therapies to target such cells as a way to prevent or treat brain conditions.

1-Jun-2021 11:15 AM EDT
Immunotherapy After Surgery Is Shown to Reduce Deadly Relapse Risk in Advanced Bladder Cancer
Mount Sinai Health System

A phase 3 clinical trial co-led by Mount Sinai researchers is the first to show that immunotherapy after surgery to remove bladder cancer can reduce the risk of relapse for patients who are at high risk of their cancer returning in a deadly metastatic form, according to results published in The New England Journal of Medicine. The immunotherapy nivolumab was used as an adjuvant therapy, which is given after surgery in the hopes of maximizing its effectiveness.

Released: 2-Jun-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Metal Contamination, Gene Signatures, Bisphenol F, and More Featured in June 2021 Toxicological Sciences
Society of Toxicology

Toxicological Sciences delivers the latest research in toxicology, in areas such as clinical and translational toxicology; emerging technologies, methods, and models; and environmental toxicology.

Newswise: LJI launches new global cancer immunology resource
Released: 2-Jun-2021 1:55 PM EDT
LJI launches new global cancer immunology resource
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) of the National Institutes of Health has granted over $4.2 million to launch the Cancer Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (CEDAR), led by La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) Professors Alessandro Sette, Dr. Biol. Sci., and Bjoern Peters, Ph.D.

Released: 2-Jun-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Patients Taking Anti-Inflammatory Drugs Respond Less Well to COVID-19 Vaccine
NYU Langone Health

One-quarter of people who take the drug methotrexate for common immune system disorders — from rheumatoid arthritis to multiple sclerosis — mount a weaker immune response to a COVID-19 vaccine, a new study shows.

Released: 2-Jun-2021 12:45 AM EDT
Time-dependent viral interference between influenza virus and coronavirus in the infection of differentiated porcine airway epithelial cells
Taylor & Francis

A new study carried out in pig cells suggests previous infection with swine influenza virus (SIV) can protect against the development of porcine respiratory coronavirus (PRCoV) if there is a zero- or three-day interval between infections.

Newswise: Research Shows Plunge in Childhood Vaccination Rates in Texas During Pandemic
Released: 1-Jun-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Research Shows Plunge in Childhood Vaccination Rates in Texas During Pandemic
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

A team of researchers from universities in California and Texas has found immunization rates for children in Texas for a wide range of diseases, including polio and measles, have dropped steeply during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Released: 28-May-2021 12:40 PM EDT
Researchers Discover Drug that Blocks Multiple SARS-CoV-2 Variants in Mice
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A small molecule STING agonist was highly protective against the virus that causes COVID-19 and likely other coronaviruses

Newswise: LJI and Synbal, Inc. partner to develop better COVID-19 models
Released: 27-May-2021 6:05 PM EDT
LJI and Synbal, Inc. partner to develop better COVID-19 models
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

The La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) is partnering with Synbal, Inc., a preclinical biotechnology company based in San Diego, CA, to develop multi-gene, humanized mouse models for COVID-19 research. The research at LJI will be led by Professor Sujan Shresta, Ph.D., a member of the Institute’s Center for Infectious Disease and Vaccine Research.

Newswise: UAB’s new Immunology Institute provides new avenues for discovery
Released: 27-May-2021 4:05 PM EDT
UAB’s new Immunology Institute provides new avenues for discovery
University of Alabama at Birmingham

UAB has established an interdisciplinary hub for research and patient care in the study of immunity.

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Released: 26-May-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Study shows SARS-CoV-2 variants unlikely to affect T cell responses
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

In a new study, scientists at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have revealed that most T cell epitopes known to be targeted upon natural infection are seemingly unaffected by current SARS-CoV-2 variants.

Newswise: Research Uncovers How ‘Non-professional’ Cells Can Trigger Immune Response
Released: 26-May-2021 1:30 PM EDT
Research Uncovers How ‘Non-professional’ Cells Can Trigger Immune Response
University of California San Diego

Researchers are finding new details on the complex dynamics involved in how organisms sense an infection from pathogens. The researchers found that worms can sense changes in their metabolism in order to unleash protective defenses, even if they don’t directly sense an incursion from pathogens.

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Released: 26-May-2021 12:55 PM EDT
How to tell the difference between seasonal allergies and COVID-19
LifeBridge Health

Spring has officially sprung, which means warmer weather, fresh blooms and the start of seasonal allergies.

Newswise: A COVID-fighter’s guide to T cells
Released: 25-May-2021 12:15 PM EDT
A COVID-fighter’s guide to T cells
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

In a new paper, scientists from La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) bring together research findings from COVID-19 researchers around the world. The results are striking: human T cells can target more than 1,400 sites on the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Newswise: Winners Announced in Vasculitis Foundation’s 2021 V-RED award program
Released: 25-May-2021 9:45 AM EDT
Winners Announced in Vasculitis Foundation’s 2021 V-RED award program
Vasculitis Foundation

Along with a first-place winner, there are two honorable mentions in the Vasculitis Foundation’s (VFs) 2021 Recognizing Excellence in Diagnostics (V-RED) award program.

Released: 24-May-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Good news: Mild COVID-19 induces lasting antibody protection
Washington University in St. Louis

People who have had a mild case of COVID-19 are left with long-term antibody protection against future disease, according to a study from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Released: 21-May-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Superficial Relationship: Enzymes Protect the Skin by Ignoring Microbes and Viruses
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers identify how the body regulates and prevents constant skin inflammation.

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Released: 21-May-2021 1:50 PM EDT
A novel defense mechanism for SARS-CoV-2 discovered
Hokkaido University

Scientists from Hokkaido University have discovered a novel defensive response to SARS-CoV-2 that involves the viral pattern recognition receptor RIG-I.

Released: 20-May-2021 5:10 PM EDT
Will COVID-19 Eventually Become Just a Seasonal Nuisance?
University of Utah Health

Within the next decade, the novel coronavirus responsible for COVID-19 could become little more than a nuisance, causing no more than common cold-like coughs and sniffles. That possible future is predicted by mathematical models that incorporate lessons learned from the current pandemic on how our body’s immunity changes over time. Scientists at the University of Utah carried out the research, now published in the journal Viruses.

19-May-2021 4:35 PM EDT
Nearly 3% of Americans take immune-weakening drugs that may limit COVID vaccine response
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A study of more than 3 million insured U.S. adult patients under 65 found that nearly 3% take immunosuppressive drugs that may elevate risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms and hospitalization if they became infected. There is growing evidence that immunosuppressive drugs may also reduce the COVID vaccine's efficacy.

Released: 18-May-2021 5:45 PM EDT
Towards a universal flu vaccine for Indigenous populations
University of Melbourne

Researchers have identified specific influenza targets that could be used to better protect Indigenous people from experiencing severe influenza disease through a universal, T cell-based vaccine.

Released: 18-May-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Analysis Suggesting Measles, Polio and Tuberculosis Vaccines May Boost Immunity to Coronavirus
Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine

Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Maryland scientists, who are also members of the Global Virus Network (GVN), a coalition comprised of human and animal virologists from 63 Centers of Excellence and 11 Affiliates in 35 countries, and colleagues today published a perspective proposing that live attenuated vaccines (LAVs), such as those for tuberculosis, measles, and polio, may induce protective innate immunity that mitigate other infectious diseases, triggering the human body’s natural emergency response to infections including COVID-19 as well as future pandemic threats.

Released: 18-May-2021 2:15 PM EDT
Bone Marrow Disorder Nearly 10-Times More Common in Those with Venom Allergy
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

In the largest U.S. study of venom allergy and mastocytosis prevalence, Michigan Medicine researchers found that people with venom allergy are nearly 10 times more likely to suffer the bone marrow disorder that causes higher risk of fatal reactions. They also found that elevated levels of tryptase, a chemical secreted by allergy cells, may predict if a person is at higher risk for reaction to immunotherapy.

Released: 18-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Meeting Preview: Hot Topics at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE
American Society for Nutrition (ASN)

Reporters and bloggers are invited to join top nutrition researchers and practitioners for a dynamic virtual program at NUTRITION 2021 LIVE ONLINE. The flagship meeting of the American Society for Nutrition runs June 7–10, 2021 and features research announcements, expert discussions and more.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-research-optimizes-body-s-own-immune-system-to-fight-cancer
VIDEO
Released: 14-May-2021 11:40 AM EDT
New research optimizes body’s own immune system to fight cancer
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A groundbreaking study led by engineering and medical researchers at the University of Minnesota Twin Cities shows how engineered immune cells used in new cancer therapies can overcome physical barriers to allow a patient’s own immune system to fight tumors. The research could improve cancer therapies in the future for millions of people worldwide.

Newswise: Researchers Develop First-in-Class Inhibitors Against Key Leukemia Protein
Released: 14-May-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Researchers Develop First-in-Class Inhibitors Against Key Leukemia Protein
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers have developed first-in-class small-molecule inhibitors against a key leukemia protein, ASH1L.

6-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Food Dyes May Cause Disease When the Immune System is Dysregulated, Mount Sinai Researchers Report
Mount Sinai Health System

Artificial food colorants can cause disease when the immune system has become dysregulated, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai researchers report. The study, published in Cell Metabolism in May, was the first to show this phenomenon.

Newswise: How the Body Builds a Healthy Relationship with “Good” Gut Bacteria
Released: 12-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT
How the Body Builds a Healthy Relationship with “Good” Gut Bacteria
University of Utah Health

Research published in Nature reveals insights into how the body maintains balance with “good” gut bacteria that allows these microbes to flourish in the intestine but keeps them out of tissues and organs where they’re not supposed to be.

Newswise: Weizmann Institute Scientists Reveal the Triple Threat of Coronavirus
Released: 12-May-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Weizmann Institute Scientists Reveal the Triple Threat of Coronavirus
Weizmann Institute of Science

Scientists at the Weizmann Institute and the Israel Institute for Biological, Chemical and Environmental Sciences took a novel tack to investigating SARS-CoV-2’s powerful ability to infect, finding that the virus deploys an apparently unique three-pronged strategy to take over the cell’s protein-synthesis abilities. The work could help develop effective Covid-19 treatments.

Newswise: Renowned Roswell Park Immunologist Promoted to Endowed Chair Role
Released: 12-May-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Renowned Roswell Park Immunologist Promoted to Endowed Chair Role
Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center

Following a national search, Roswell Park Comprehensive Cancer Center has promoted Pawel Kalinski, MD, PhD, to Jacobs Family Endowed Chair of Immunology, Chief of the Division of Translational Immuno-Oncology and Senior Vice President for Team Science.

Released: 10-May-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Agents that target viral RNA could be the basis for next generation anti-viral drugs
University of Birmingham

A new approach to tackling viruses by targeting the 'control centre' in viral RNA could lead to broad spectrum anti-viral drugs and provide a first line of defence against future pandemics, according to new research at the University of Birmingham.

Newswise: New grant-funded research could help improve therapies for sepsis
Released: 6-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
New grant-funded research could help improve therapies for sepsis
University of Kentucky

A University of Kentucky College of Medicine professor has been awarded a $1.9 million NIH grant for his research on the body’s immune response to sepsis, which could potentially help to improve therapies for the common disease.

Released: 6-May-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Evidence suggests bubonic plague had long-term effect on human immunity genes
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus

Scientists examining the remains of 36 bubonic plague victims from a 16th century mass grave in Germany have found the first evidence that evolutionary adaptive processes, driven by the disease, may have conferred immunity on later generations of people from the region.


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