Latest News from: Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Nov-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 702877

How Beatboxers Produce Sound: Using Real-Time MRI to Understand

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Beatboxing is a musical art form in which performers use their vocal tract to create percussive sounds, and a team of researchers is using real-time MRI to study the production of beatboxing sounds. Timothy Greer will describe their work showing how real-time MRI can characterize different beatboxing styles and how video signal processing can demystify the mechanics of artistic style. Greer will present the study at the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9.

Released:
1-Nov-2018 10:05 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    7-Nov-2018 12:00 PM EST

Article ID: 702870

How Do Babies Laugh? Like Chimps!

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Few things can delight an adult more easily than the uninhibited, effervescent laughter of a baby. Yet baby laughter, a new study shows, differs from adult laughter in a key way: Babies laugh as they both exhale and inhale, in a manner that is remarkably similar to nonhuman primates. The research will be described by Disa Sauter during a talk at the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9.

Released:
1-Nov-2018 10:05 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Nov-2018 6:00 PM EST

Article ID: 703156

Preschool Children Show Awake Responses to Nap Time Nonsense Words

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Hearing has long been suspected as being "on" all the time -- even in our sleep. Sounds that occur during the night have a way of registering in the brain. Now scientists are reporting results on what is heard and not heard during sleep and what that might mean for a developing brain. At the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9, researchers from Vanderbilt University will present preliminary results from a study in which preschool children showed memory traces for sounds heard during nap time.

Released:
2-Nov-2018 9:25 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Nov-2018 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 702885

For Adults, the Terrible Twos are a Confusing Earful

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Here's another reason you might be exhausted after that preschool birthday party: Your brain had to work to figure out who actually asked for more ice cream. "What we found with two-and-a-half-year-olds is that it's amazingly hard for adults to identify who's talking," said Angela Cooper, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Toronto. Cooper's co-authored research will be presented in the poster session at the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9.

Released:
1-Nov-2018 9:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Nov-2018 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 703173

Bats v. Dolphins – The Ultimate Battle of Sonar Systems

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

To find ways to improve man-made active sensing, scientists worldwide study the sonar systems of bats and dolphins. During the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9, Laura Kloepper will compare bat and dolphin sonar systems, describing her work on how the two animals cope with acoustic interference. She'll use her findings to argue why bats have the superior system.

Released:
31-Oct-2018 2:05 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Nov-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 702952

Orcasound: A Citizen Science Tool for Whale Research

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Computer algorithms are playing a growing role in analyzing hydrophone audio data when monitoring marine life, but human listeners can complement and enhance these algorithms. A project known as Orcasound has produced a web application that will enable citizen scientists to listen to livestreaming audio from hydrophones near the San Juan Islands. Researchers will describe the new web app and the value of citizen science at the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9.

Released:
1-Nov-2018 8:50 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Nov-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 703130

Moths Survive Bat Predation Through Acoustic Camouflage Fur

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Moths are a mainstay food source for bats, which use echolocation to hunt their prey. Scientists are studying how moths have evolved passive defenses over millions of years to resist their primary predators. While some moths have evolved ears that detect the ultrasonic calls of bats, many types of moths remain deaf. In those moths, researchers have found that the insects developed types of “stealth coating” that serve as acoustic camouflage to evade hungry bats. Neil will describe his work during the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9.

Released:
31-Oct-2018 10:05 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    5-Nov-2018 7:15 PM EST

Article ID: 703199

Deconstructing Crowd Noise at College Basketball Games

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

With thousands of fans, college basketball games can be almost deafeningly loud. Some arenas have decibel meters, which can provide some indication of the noise generated. Researchers at Brigham Young University wanted to see whether machine learning algorithms could pick out patterns within the raw acoustical data that indicated the crowd’s mood, thereby providing clues as to what was happening in the game itself. They’ll present at the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9.

Released:
1-Nov-2018 10:00 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    5-Nov-2018 6:30 PM EST

Article ID: 702973

How Clear Speech Equates to Clear Memory

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Some conversations are forgotten as soon as they are over, while other exchanges may leave lasting imprints. Researchers want to understand why and how listeners remember some spoken utterances more clearly than others. They’re specifically looking at ways in which clarity of speaking style can affect memory. They will describe their work at the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9.

Released:
1-Nov-2018 8:35 AM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    5-Nov-2018 6:00 PM EST

Article ID: 703246

Identifying a Piranha by Its Bark

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Next month, Rodney Rountree, “The Fish Listener,” will talk about his work with Francis Juanes of the University of Victoria, to document calls made by fish in the Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve in Peru in a presentation at the Acoustical Society of America's 176th Meeting, Nov. 5-9. These calls may be useful for tracking piranha populations through passive acoustic monitoring.

Released:
1-Nov-2018 3:05 PM EDT

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