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  • Embargo expired:
    10-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693731

Cloaking Devices -- It’s Not Just ‘Star Trek’ Anymore

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Scientists are now working to take cloaking devices from the dramatic realm of science fiction and make them real. Amanda D. Hanford, at Pennsylvania State University, is taking the introductory steps to make acoustic ground cloaks. These materials redirect approaching waves around an object without scattering the wave energy, concealing the object from the sound waves. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Hanford will describe the physics behind an underwater acoustic shield designed in her lab.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    9-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693561

From the Mouths of Babes: Infants Really Enjoy Hearing From Their Peers

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Sorry, new parents -- even though your infants appreciate your coos, they prefer to hear sounds from their peers -- other babies. Even at the pre-babbling stage, infants recognize vowel-like sounds, but they tend to dwell on these sounds when from the mouths of babes. At the 175th ASA Meeting, researchers will present from a new line of research focusing on one aspect of infant speech development: how babies perceive speech with infant vocal properties.

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26-Apr-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

ASA_SPRING_2018_ValidatingAuditorySpatial_Stecker-Image4.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    9-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693821

Virtual Reality Technology Opens New Doors of (Spatial) Perception

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Locating and discriminating sound sources is extremely complex because the brain must process spatial information from many, sometimes conflicting, cues. Using virtual reality and other immersive technologies, researchers can use new methods to investigate how we make sense of the word with sound. At the 175th ASA Meeting, G. Christopher Stecker will survey his team’s use of virtual reality and augmented auditory reality to study how people use explicit and implicit sound cues.

Released:
1-May-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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ASA_SPRING_2018_UltrasoundCuba_Leighton-AJ_IMAGE1.png
  • Embargo expired:
    9-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693567

Ultrasonic Attack is Unlikely, But Incidental Exposure Presents Plenty of Problems

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

New technologies for mobile devices may use ultrasonic sound waves, and these devices have varying effects on different subsets of the population. Regulation of these technologies is in many ways “the wild west,” according to Timothy Leighton, who wrote a guide for moving forward in today’s new world of ultrasonic exposure. He will describe his work uncovering the strange history and uncertain future of the use of ultrasonic sound waves during the 175th ASA Meeting.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693596

Can Chimpanzee Vocalizations Reveal the Origins of Human Language?

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Fossil primates provide important clues about human evolution, but the sounds they made and the soft tissue involved in making those sounds weren’t preserved. So chimpanzees can provide important points of comparison for inferring the sorts of sounds our early ancestors may have made. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Michael Wilson, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota, will present his group’s work searching for similarities between the vocal communications of chimpanzees and humans.

Released:
26-Apr-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    8-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693636

What Does a ‘Normal’ Voice Sound Like?

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Humans communicate their intentions, feelings and desires verbally, so voice disorders can have devastating personal and professional consequences. A perceived voice abnormality may lead to a negative assessment of the speaker’s intelligence, health and personality. During the 175th ASA Meeting, researchers will describe their work on voice perception and what it means for a voice to sound “normal.”

Released:
27-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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ChildExperienceBinauralStimuli.png
  • Embargo expired:
    8-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693905

Synchronizing Cochlear Signals Stimulates Brain to ‘Hear’ in Stereo

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Using both ears to hear increases speech recognition and improves sound localization. Ruth Litovsky, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, wants to bring this advantage to people who use cochlear implants. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Litovsky will present data showing a new technique that synchronizes the cochlear signals that stimulate the brain in a way that is similar to people who can hear normally.

Released:
2-May-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693789

Can ‘Local Acoustic Treatment’ Reduce Speech Distraction Within Open-Plan Offices?

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

To make open offices less noisy, researchers are creating small “acoustic islands” using high-back chairs and retroreflective ceilings to direct sound to help you hear your own conversations -- not others’ -- better. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Manuj Yadav, at the University of Sydney, will present his and his colleagues’ work toward solutions to the speech distraction problem in open-plan offices.

Released:
1-May-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693712

Marine Animals Can Hear Us Swim, Kayak and Scuba Dive

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

While it is obvious that things like boats can be heard by marine life under the water, what about human activities like swimming, canoeing and scuba diving? During the 175th ASA Meeting, Christine Erbe, director of the Centre for Marine Science & Technology at Curtin University in Perth, Western Australia, will describe her work exploring the impact of man-made underwater noise on marine life.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 692360

Save the Date: Leading Acoustics Meeting in Minneapolis May 7-11, 2018

Acoustical Society of America (ASA)

Science promises to sound more exciting than ever at this year's Acoustical Society of America meeting. Presenters will reveal the latest in acoustics research with insight into topics like how new materials could control acoustic waves, improving audio in virtual reality, acoustic levitation, and how certain insects use acoustics to attract a mate, as well as much more.

Released:
6-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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