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Newswise: Historic graffiti made by soldiers sheds light on Africa maritime heritage, study shows
Released: 6-May-2022 4:55 PM EDT
Historic graffiti made by soldiers sheds light on Africa maritime heritage, study shows
University of Exeter

Historic graffiti of ships carved in an African fort were drawn by soldiers on guard duty watching the sea, University of Exeter experts believe.

Newswise: Discovery Provides Insight Into Neglected Tropical Disease
Released: 5-Apr-2022 1:15 PM EDT
Discovery Provides Insight Into Neglected Tropical Disease
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UTSW scientists identify key molecule produced by male parasitic worms that affects sexual maturity in females and leads to schistosomiasis

Released: 5-Apr-2022 4:05 AM EDT
Company Tax Dodging Has Devastating Effect on Developing World
University of Portsmouth

Billion-pound tax dodging companies behave like ‘parasites’, robbing from the poor on a grand scale, according to new research.

Newswise: Who you know can make or break employment opportunities for African migrants
Released: 30-Mar-2022 9:05 PM EDT
Who you know can make or break employment opportunities for African migrants
University of South Australia

Racial hierarchies and a lack of the ‘right sort’ of social connections are hindering African-born migrants from securing meaningful employment in South Australia, according to new research by the University of South Australia.

Newswise: CSUDH History Professor Wins Prestigious NEH Award
Released: 15-Mar-2022 6:05 PM EDT
CSUDH History Professor Wins Prestigious NEH Award
California State University, Dominguez Hills

The fellowship is for CSUDH Professor of History Bianca Murillo's next book, Financing Africa’s Future: A Socio-Economic History of Ghana, 1950-1980.

Newswise: The next frontier for African genomics - safeguarding African biodiversity
Released: 15-Mar-2022 11:40 AM EDT
The next frontier for African genomics - safeguarding African biodiversity
University of South Africa

The African BioGenome Project (AfricaBP) published a position paper in the journal Nature highlighting the goals, priorities, and roadmap of the impressive Africa-led effort to sequence the genomes of plants, animals, fungi, and protists that are endemic to the continent of Africa.

Released: 9-Mar-2022 12:20 PM EST
Heatwave hotspots linked to urban agglomerations in Africa
Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Due to global warming, heatwave events will likely cause severe damage to natural ecosystems and human society.

Newswise: New Genetic Analysis of Ancient Africans Creates a Clearer Picture of Life 50,000 Years Ago
18-Feb-2022 10:35 AM EST
New Genetic Analysis of Ancient Africans Creates a Clearer Picture of Life 50,000 Years Ago
Stony Brook University

Ancient DNA from the remains of nearly three dozen African foragers sheds new light on how groups across sub-Saharan Africa lived, traveled and settled prior to the spread of herding and farming. The study findings, to be published in Nature, produced the earliest DNA of humans on the continent.

Newswise: Multi-Country African Research Reports High Rates of COVID-19-Related Deaths Among Hospitalized Children and Adolescents
Released: 15-Feb-2022 11:55 AM EST
Multi-Country African Research Reports High Rates of COVID-19-Related Deaths Among Hospitalized Children and Adolescents
University of Maryland School of Medicine

African children and adolescents hospitalized with COVID-19 experience much higher mortality rates than Europeans or North Americans, according to a study conducted by the Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Institute of Human Virology Nigeria.

Newswise: DNA testing exposes tactics of international criminal networks trafficking elephant ivory
11-Feb-2022 11:00 AM EST
DNA testing exposes tactics of international criminal networks trafficking elephant ivory
University of Washington

University of Washington scientists and U.S. officials used genetic testing of ivory shipments seized by law enforcement to uncover the international criminal networks behind ivory trafficking out of Africa, exposing an even higher degree of connection among smugglers than previously known.

Released: 10-Feb-2022 4:15 PM EST
WHO efforts to bring vaccine manufacturing to Africa is being undermined by pharma, reveals The BMJ
BMJ

The World Health Organization (WHO) is supporting African companies to make a covid vaccine. But today, in an article co-published with German newspaper Die Welt, The BMJ can reveal that a foundation representing vaccine maker BioNtech has been accused of seeking to undermine this initiative.

Newswise: Ebola Vaccine Being Used in Congo Produces Lasting Antibody Response, Study Finds
Released: 8-Feb-2022 5:10 PM EST
Ebola Vaccine Being Used in Congo Produces Lasting Antibody Response, Study Finds
UCLA Fielding School of Public Health

A new study by UCLA researchers and colleagues demonstrates that the Ebola vaccine known as rVSVΔG-ZEBOV-GP results in a robust and enduring antibody response among vaccinated individuals in areas of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) that are experiencing outbreaks of the disease. Among the more than 600 study participants, 95.6% demonstrated antibody persistence six months after they received the vaccine. The study is the first published research examining post–Ebola-vaccination antibody response in the DRC, a nation of nearly 90 million. While long-term analyses of the study cohort continue, the findings will help inform health officials’ approach to vaccine use for outbreak control, the researchers said.

Released: 8-Feb-2022 9:00 AM EST
Global Virus Network (GVN) Adds the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) as Newest Member to Combat Viral Threats
Global Virus Network

Baltimore, Maryland, USA, February 8, 2021: The Global Virus Network (GVN), representing 68 Centers of Excellence and 10 Affiliates in 36 countries comprising foremost experts in every class of virus causing disease in humans, and the Centre for the AIDS Programme of Research in South Africa (CAPRISA) in Durban announced the addition of CAPRISA as GVN’s newest Center of Excellence.

Newswise: Machine Learning Uncovers Violence During Apartheid, Earns Top Honor from Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation for University of Kentucky Researchers
Released: 7-Feb-2022 10:30 AM EST
Machine Learning Uncovers Violence During Apartheid, Earns Top Honor from Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation for University of Kentucky Researchers
University of Kentucky

The $45,000 award will support the Bitter Aloe Project, which uses machine learning models to extract data from records produced by South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Newswise: Prehistoric human vertebra discovered in the Jordan Valley tells the story of prehistoric migration from Africa
Released: 2-Feb-2022 4:50 PM EST
Prehistoric human vertebra discovered in the Jordan Valley tells the story of prehistoric migration from Africa
Bar-Ilan University

A new study, led by researchers from Bar-Ilan University, Ono Academic College, The University of Tulsa, and the Israel Antiquities Authority, presents a 1.5 million-year-old human vertebra discovered in Israel's Jordan Valley.

Released: 24-Jan-2022 2:50 PM EST
UI Health doctors to study new diagnostic test for preeclampsia in Africa 
University of Illinois Chicago

Researchers from University of Illinois Chicago have received funding to study a novel diagnostic kit for preeclampsia. Preeclampsia is pregnancy-related hypertension that can occur at or after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Left untreated, preeclampsia can disrupt fetal growth and lead to preterm birth and stillbirth. In mothers, it can also cause kidney and liver failure and culminate in seizures, coma and death.

Released: 19-Jan-2022 5:45 PM EST
Children in Sub-Saharan Africa dying of COVID-19 at a higher rate than others
University of Pittsburgh

Children in sub-Saharan Africa who are hospitalized with COVID-19 are dying at a rate far greater than children in the U.S. and Europe, according to a new multicenter study published today in JAMA Pediatrics and led by a University of Pittsburgh infectious diseases epidemiologist.

Released: 17-Jan-2022 8:00 AM EST
Making the invisible visible: tracing the origins of plants in West African cuisine
University of Bristol

A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, in co-operation with colleagues from Goethe University, Frankfurt, has uncovered the first insights into the origins of West African plant-based cuisine, locked inside pottery fragments dating back some 3,500 years ago.

Newswise: Podcast: Young advocate bolsters epilepsy awareness in Zambia
Released: 14-Jan-2022 12:05 PM EST
Podcast: Young advocate bolsters epilepsy awareness in Zambia
International League Against Epilepsy

Since his 2016 epilepsy diagnosis, Bright M. Bwalya has shared information about epilepsy through radio and TV interviews, education sessions, and a mobile app. He works to correct misinformation and to remind people that "you are not your epilepsy."

Newswise: Rare African script offers clues to the evolution of writing
Released: 10-Jan-2022 2:25 PM EST
Rare African script offers clues to the evolution of writing
Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History

The world’s very first invention of writing took place over 5000 years ago in the Middle East, before it was reinvented in China and Central America.

Released: 7-Jan-2022 8:00 AM EST
Preliminary findings from studies in South Africa indicate that omicron has a much higher rate of asymptomatic ‘carriage’ than other variants of concern
Covid-19 Prevention Network (CoVPN)

Preliminary findings from two clinical trials in South Africa suggest that the omicron variant of the virus that causes COVID-19 may have a much higher rate of asymptomatic ‘carriage’ than earlier variants. This higher asymptomatic carriage rate is likely a major factor in the rapid and widespread dissemination of the variant, even among populations with high prior rates of coronavirus infection.

Released: 28-Dec-2021 1:40 PM EST
CDC Awards $2 Million to Penn to Combat Antimicrobial Resistance in Southern Africa
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

More than $2 million in grants from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) will allow a Penn Medicine team to further develop infrastructure and clinical capacity to address antimicrobial resistance and infectious diseases in Botswana.

Newswise: World Renowned Geneticist and Sickle Cell Disease Expert Takes Helm of Genetic Medicine Department at Johns Hopkins
Released: 28-Dec-2021 9:00 AM EST
World Renowned Geneticist and Sickle Cell Disease Expert Takes Helm of Genetic Medicine Department at Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins Medicine

South African geneticist Ambroise Wonkam, M.D., Ph.D., D.Med.Sc., has been selected as Johns Hopkins Medicine’s director of the Department of Genetic Medicine and the McKusick-Nathans Institute of Genetic Medicine.

Newswise: Wise old elephants keep the young calm
Released: 22-Dec-2021 2:05 PM EST
Wise old elephants keep the young calm
University of Exeter

Male elephants are more aggressive when fewer older males are present, new research suggests.

Newswise: Understanding human-elephant conflict and vulnerability in the face of climate change
Released: 21-Dec-2021 10:50 AM EST
Understanding human-elephant conflict and vulnerability in the face of climate change
Northern Arizona University

How do climate change and human-elephant conflict affect household food security in Africa? NAU wildlife conservationist Duan Biggs spent three years with an international team of researchers investigating the dynamics between wildlife, people and the environment on the African savannah to better understand how both climate change and human-elephant conflict can impact household food insecurity in the region.

Newswise: Biodiversity Research Institute Announces Publication of New Scientific Paper on the Benefits of Savanna Fire Management in Africa
Released: 9-Dec-2021 12:15 PM EST
Biodiversity Research Institute Announces Publication of New Scientific Paper on the Benefits of Savanna Fire Management in Africa
Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI)

Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI), announces the publication of the scientific paper Savanna fire management can generate enough carbon revenue to help restore Africa’s rangelands and fill Protected Area funding gaps in the December issue of the journal One Earth. The new study builds on a history of collaborative and independent research by BRI, The Nature Conservancy (TNC), Soils for the Future, the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and the Wildlife Conservation Network (WCN) that has culminated in this paper, which quantifies the benefits of savanna fire management in Africa.

Released: 8-Dec-2021 10:40 AM EST
$14M grant to adapt West African rice production to climate
Cornell University

The Climate Resilient Farming Systems program at Cornell is playing a key role in an initiative to make rice more resilient to climate change and increase production of the staple crop for smallholder rice farmers across 13 West African countries, thanks to a four-year, $14 million grant from the Adaptation Fund.

Newswise: Cornell program promotes African links, diversity in plant sciences
Released: 18-Nov-2021 4:05 PM EST
Cornell program promotes African links, diversity in plant sciences
Cornell University

The Cornell University Assistantship for Horticulture in Africa, a program that brings master’s students from sub-Saharan Africa to Cornell to complete doctorate degrees in horticulture, has now added a second assistantship for African Americans.

Newswise: Single-dose HPV vaccine highly effective, researchers say
Released: 18-Nov-2021 8:35 AM EST
Single-dose HPV vaccine highly effective, researchers say
University of Washington School of Medicine

A randomized controlled trial of 2,275 women in Kenya showed that a single dose of the HPV vaccine was highly effective. The current standard for women is three doses. This news could greatly hasten the pace of vaccinations and brings renewed energy to make cervical cancer the first cancer to be wiped out.

Released: 15-Nov-2021 10:40 AM EST
Larger conservation areas didn’t protect animals in central Africa
Ohio State University

Efforts to protect threatened and endangered species in central Africa might be more successful if they focused on a smaller geographic area, new research suggests.

Newswise: Study Documents Nigeria’s Staggering Role in Trafficking of Pangolins
Released: 4-Nov-2021 12:30 PM EDT
Study Documents Nigeria’s Staggering Role in Trafficking of Pangolins
Wildlife Conservation Society

A new study in the journal Biological Conservation has documented Nigeria’s staggering role in trafficking of wild pangolins, the anteater-like mammal whose scales are used in traditional Chinese medicines; all international commercial trade in pangolins and their parts is illegal.

Newswise: IHV Researchers Receive $6.5M to Create African Big Data Hub Designed to Address Public Health and Pandemic Preparedness
Released: 4-Nov-2021 12:20 PM EDT
IHV Researchers Receive $6.5M to Create African Big Data Hub Designed to Address Public Health and Pandemic Preparedness
Institute of Human Virology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM)’s Institute of Human Virology (IHV), a Global Virus Network (GVN) Center of Excellence, have received $6.5 million from the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) to streamline big data collection in Nigeria and South Africa in addressing public health needs of the COVID-19 and HIV pandemics.

Released: 29-Oct-2021 4:05 PM EDT
A Landmark Achievement: The Story of Improved Cowpea
Donald Danforth Plant Science Center

Cowpeas, or black-eyed peas, are an incredibly important staple crop for much of Africa.

Released: 26-Oct-2021 12:50 PM EDT
Multi-institution project to train Kenyan experts to bring social determinants to bear on modeling health outcomes
NYU Tandon School of Engineering

A data-science training program for equipping leaders to support the improvement of health outcomes in Kenya, led by a team from NYU, Brown University, and Moi University in Kenya, was chosen as one of 19 initiatives funded by The National Institutes of Health (NIH) under its new Harnessing Data Science for Health Discovery and Innovation in Africa (DS-I Africa) program.

Newswise: Researchers from Nebraska, Ethiopia rethinking the coffee ‘cherry’
Released: 21-Oct-2021 10:20 AM EDT
Researchers from Nebraska, Ethiopia rethinking the coffee ‘cherry’
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Starting the day with a cup of coffee is a daily ritual for many across the United States, and variations on coffee have changed over time, including the trendy options — iced, frozen, cold brew — and of course, the traditional hot and black.

Released: 19-Oct-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Cornell scientists to join team for live volcanic eruption
Cornell University

Esteban Gazel and doctoral student Kyle Dayton will join a small, elite team of international researchers on Oct. 21 at the newly erupted Cumbre Vieja volcano on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands – off the coast of western Africa.

Released: 19-Oct-2021 8:50 AM EDT
Road impacts on ecosystems in sub-Saharan Africa
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

With growing economies and increased trade, major road infrastructure plans have been developed for Sub-Saharan Africa. New research looked into how roads might impact ecosystems in the region.

Released: 12-Oct-2021 3:10 PM EDT
COVID-19 waves in Kenya explained by socio-economic differences and introduction of variants
University of Warwick

New modeling from the University of Warwick and KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kenya highlights the role of socioeconomic status in transmission of COVID-19

Released: 8-Oct-2021 6:10 PM EDT
Air pollution caused 1.1 million deaths across Africa in 2019, new study finds
Boston College

Air pollution was responsible for 1.1 million deaths across Africa in 2019, with household air pollution -- driven largely by indoor cookstoves -- accounting for 700,000 fatalities, while increased outdoor air pollution claimed 400,000 lives, a team of researchers led by Boston College and the UN Environment Programme report in the latest edition of the journal The Lancet Planetary Health.

Newswise: Malaria Parasite Evolving to Evade Rapid Diagnostics in Africa
Released: 28-Sep-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Malaria Parasite Evolving to Evade Rapid Diagnostics in Africa
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

This research, published in Nature Microbiology, showed that two genetic mutations to the parasite Plasmodium falciparum -- the most common cause of malaria cases and deaths -- allow it to escape detection from rapid tests.

Newswise: World-renowned African mathematician joins University of Bristol in new role to advance international learning and leadership
Released: 27-Sep-2021 1:00 PM EDT
World-renowned African mathematician joins University of Bristol in new role to advance international learning and leadership
University of Bristol

A trailblazing academic leader has embarked on an exciting new role as the University of Bristol’s first-ever Bristol Illustrious Visiting Professor to supercharge African scholarship, inspire learning, and strengthen relationships on a global stage.

Newswise: Ancient DNA analysis sheds light on dark event in medieval Spain
Released: 24-Sep-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Ancient DNA analysis sheds light on dark event in medieval Spain
University of Huddersfield

An international research team led by the University of Huddersfield's Archaeogenetics Research Group, including geneticists, archaeological scientists, and archaeologists, has published the genome sequence of a unique individual from Islamic medieval Spain – al-Andalus - the results of which have shed light on a brutal event that took place in medieval Spain.

20-Sep-2021 5:40 PM EDT
Deadly virus’s pathway to infect cells identified
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Pittsburgh have discovered how Rift Valley fever virus enters cells, pointing the way to new therapies to treat the deadly Rift Valley fever.

Newswise: web_chimps_crossing_road_rh_218xfree.jpg
Released: 15-Sep-2021 1:55 PM EDT
Roads have far-reaching impact on chimpanzees
University of Exeter

Roads have a negative impact on chimpanzee populations that can extend for more than 17 km, new research shows.

Released: 2-Sep-2021 8:55 AM EDT
How Much Energy Do We Need to Achieve a Decent Life for All?
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

IIASA researchers have assessed how much energy is needed to provide the global poor with a decent life and have found that this can be reconciled with efforts to meet climate targets.


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