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Embargo will expire: 23-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 22-Jun-2021 12:15 PM EDT

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Embargo will expire: 24-Jun-2021 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 22-Jun-2021 12:05 PM EDT

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 24-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 22-Jun-2021 11:15 AM EDT

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Newswise: Antelope’s Fate Shrouded by Social, Political Forces
Released: 22-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Antelope’s Fate Shrouded by Social, Political Forces
University of Georgia

The story of efforts to conserve the endangered oribi in South Africa represent a diaspora of issues as varied as the people who live there.

Newswise: First Wave COVID-19 Data Underestimated Pandemic Infections
18-Jun-2021 8:30 AM EDT
First Wave COVID-19 Data Underestimated Pandemic Infections
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Two COVID-19 pandemic curves emerged within many cities during the one-year period from March 2020 to March 2021. Oddly, the number of total daily infections reported during the first wave is much lower than that of the second, but the total number of daily deaths reported during the first wave is much higher than the second wave.

Newswise: Julia Programming Language Tackles Differential Equation Challenges
21-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Julia Programming Language Tackles Differential Equation Challenges
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Emerging open-source programming language Julia is designed to be fast and easy to use. Since it is particularly suited for numerical applications, scientists are using it to explore the challenges in transitioning to all-renewable power generation. Decarbonization implies a radical restructuring of power grids, which will become even more complex, so new computational tools are needed. In Chaos, researchers describe a software package they built to enable the simulation of general dynamical systems on complex networks.

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21-Jun-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Tree Pollen Carries SARS-CoV-2 Particles Farther, Facilitates Virus Spread
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

A study on the role of microscopic particles in virus transmission suggests pollen is nothing to sneeze at. In Physics of Fluids, researchers investigate how pollen facilitates the spread of an RNA virus like the COVID-19 virus. The study draws on cutting-edge computational approaches for analyzing fluid dynamics to mimic the pollen movement from a willow tree, a prototypical pollen emitter. Airborne pollen grains contribute to the spread of airborne viruses, especially in crowded environments.

Newswise: Synthetic Tree Enhances Solar Steam Generation for Harvesting Drinking Water
22-Jun-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Synthetic Tree Enhances Solar Steam Generation for Harvesting Drinking Water
American Institute of Physics (AIP)

Solar steam generation has emerged as a promising renewable energy technology for water harvesting, desalination, and purification that could benefit people who need it most in remote communities, disaster-relief areas, and developing nations. In Applied Physics Letters, researchers inspired by mangrove trees thriving along coastlines developed a synthetic tree to enhance SSG, replacing capillary action with transpiration, the process of water movement through a plant and its evaporation from leaves, stems, and flowers.

Newswise: New Machine Learning Methods Could Improve Environmental Predictions
Released: 22-Jun-2021 10:45 AM EDT
New Machine Learning Methods Could Improve Environmental Predictions
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A team of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, University of Minnesota, and U.S. Geological Survey A team of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh, University of Minnesota, and U.S. Geological Survey have developed a new machine learning technique that could improve environmental predictions.

Released: 22-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Self-Reported Declines in Cognition May be Linked to Changes in Brain Connectivity
Wayne State University Division of Research

A team from Wayne State University recently published the results of a three-year study of cognitive changes in older adults who complained that their cognitive ability was worsening though clinical assessments showed no impairments. MRIs at 18-month intervals showed significant changes in functional connectivity in two areas of the brain.

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Embargo will expire: 23-Jun-2021 2:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 22-Jun-2021 10:00 AM EDT

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18-Jun-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Size Matters: Higher Licensed Venue Capacity Linked to Greater Risk of Alcohol-Related Violence
Research Society on Alcoholism

Disproportionately more assaults occur in higher-capacity licensed venues than in their smaller counterparts, according to an Australian study reported in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research. Licensed premises are high-risk settings for violent incidents, and a sizeable proportion of all alcohol-related violence occurs within them. Factors linked to aggressive in-venue behavior include inadequate seating, inconvenient bar access, crowded spaces, and drunkenness – which are all more likely in venues with more people (and hence in higher-capacity premises). However, although venue capacity had been proposed as a risk factor for on-premises violence, most previous research has focused on the relationship between crowding and aggression, and on the impact of longer trading hours. In the current study, therefore, researchers investigated the association between venue capacity and the number of violent incidents on-premises; the impact of longer opening hours was also assessed.

21-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Mount Sinai Researchers Discover a Novel Class of Drugs That May Help Treat a Deadly Type of Lymphoma
Mount Sinai Health System

A new class of drugs that inhibits a “master switch” involved in the vast majority of cases of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a fatal subtype of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, has been discovered by researchers at Mount Sinai.

Released: 22-Jun-2021 9:05 AM EDT
Mental Well-Being Higher in the Summer vs. Fall
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Mental distress tends to be lower in the summer when compared to the fall, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Released: 22-Jun-2021 8:30 AM EDT
Engineering Nanobodies As Lifesavers When SARS-CoV-2 Variants Attack
Ohio State University

Scientists are pursuing a new strategy in the protracted fight against the SARS-CoV-2 virus by engineering nanobodies that can neutralize virus variants in two different ways.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 23-Jun-2021 5:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 22-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 23-Jun-2021 5:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 22-Jun-2021 8:00 AM EDT

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Newswise: Molecular Connections from Plants to Fungi to Ants
Released: 22-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Molecular Connections from Plants to Fungi to Ants
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Leaf-cutter ants tend fungal gardens that convert lipids in leaves into lipids the ants can use for energy, building cells, and communication between organisms. New research has found that different regions of the ants’ fungal gardens were enriched with different lipids. This helps scientists understand communications between organisms in different kingdoms of life.

Released: 22-Jun-2021 6:05 AM EDT
The Humidity of Flowers Acts As An Invisible Attractor For Bumblebees
University of Bristol

As well as bright colours and subtle scents, flowers possess many invisible ways of attracting their pollinators, and a new study shows that bumblebees may use the humidity of a flower to tell them about the presence of nectar, according to scientists at the Universities of Bristol and Exeter.

Released: 22-Jun-2021 5:05 AM EDT
What Facebook Can Tell Us About Dietary Choices
International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

A new IIASA-led study set out to understand the full potential of behavior change and what drives such changes in people’s choices across the world using data from almost two billion Facebook profiles.

Newswise: New Crab Species with Asymmetrical Reproductive Units Identified by NUS Researchers and Their Japanese Collaborators
Released: 21-Jun-2021 10:05 PM EDT
New Crab Species with Asymmetrical Reproductive Units Identified by NUS Researchers and Their Japanese Collaborators
National University of Singapore

Researchers from the National University of Singapore and University of the Ryukyus have recently identified and described a new genus and species of xanthid crab found in Okinawa Island, Ryukyu Islands, Japan. Named Mabui calculus, it is the first among the 7,800 species of known crabs to have strongly asymmetrical male and female reproductive structures.

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Released: 21-Jun-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Researchers trace dust grain's journey through newborn solar system
University of Arizona

A research team led by the University of Arizona has reconstructed in unprecedented detail the history of a dust grain that formed during the birth of the solar system more than 4.5 billion years ago.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 23-Jun-2021 10:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 21-Jun-2021 6:00 PM EDT

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Released: 21-Jun-2021 5:55 PM EDT
UCI-led study finds that cancer immunotherapy may self-limit its efficacy
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 21, 2021 — Cancer immunotherapy involving drugs that inhibit CTLA-4 also activates an unwanted response that may self-limit its efficacy in fighting tumors, according to a new study led by Francesco Marangoni, Ph.D., assistant professor of physiology & biophysics and member of the Institute for Immunology at the University of California, Irvine.

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Released: 21-Jun-2021 4:35 PM EDT
How do developing spinal cords choose 'heads' or 'tails'?
Gladstone Institutes

The progression from a round ball of cells to an embryo with a head and a tail is one of the most critical steps in an organism's development.

Released: 21-Jun-2021 4:25 PM EDT
The Science of tsunamis
University of California, Santa Barbara

The word "tsunami" brings immediately to mind the havoc that can be wrought by these uniquely powerful waves.

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Released: 21-Jun-2021 4:10 PM EDT
Study examines how breast implant surfaces affect immune response
Rice University

Rice University bioengineers collaborated on a six-year study that systematically analyzed how the surface architecture of breast implants influences the development of adverse effects, including an unusual type of lymphoma.

Newswise: 268513_web.jpg
Released: 21-Jun-2021 4:05 PM EDT
Poaching Affects Behavior Of Endangered Capuchin Monkeys In Brazilian Biological Reserve
Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo

A study conducted in the Una Biological Reserve in the state of Bahia, Brazil, shows that in a habitat with high hunting pressure the risk of predation has such a significant impact on the behavior of the Yellow-breasted capuchin monkey Sapajus xanthosternos that it even avoids areas offering an abundant supply of plant biomass and invertebrates, its main sources of food.

Newswise: IMG_1266-Ocotillo-Coyote-Mt-and-Santa-Rosa-Mountains-FB-copy-768x513.jpg
Released: 21-Jun-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Climate Change Is Driving Plant Die-Offs In Southern California, UCI Study Finds
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June 21, 2021 – A shift is happening in Southern California, and this time it has nothing to do with earthquakes. According to a new study by scientists at the University of California, Irvine, climate change is altering the number of plants populating the region’s deserts and mountains. Using data from the Landsat satellite mission and focusing on an area of nearly 5,000 square miles surrounding Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, the research team found that between 1984 and 2017, vegetation cover in desert ecosystems decreased overall by about 35 percent, with mountains seeing a 13 percent vegetation decline.

Released: 21-Jun-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Rare Neurological Disorder Documented Following COVID-19 Vaccination
American Neurological Association (ANA)

In two separate articles in the Annals of Neurology, clinicians in India and England report cases of a rare neurological disorder called Guillain-Barré syndrome after individuals were vaccinated against COVID-19.

Released: 21-Jun-2021 3:40 PM EDT
Modeling A Circular Economy For Electronic Waste
University of Pittsburgh

Think about how many different pieces of technology the average household has purchased in the last decade.

Newswise: ‘Pack Ice’ Tectonics Reveal Venus’ Geological Secrets
Released: 21-Jun-2021 3:40 PM EDT
‘Pack Ice’ Tectonics Reveal Venus’ Geological Secrets
North Carolina State University

A new analysis of Venus’ surface shows evidence of tectonic motion in the form of crustal blocks that have jostled against each other like broken chunks of pack ice.

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Released: 21-Jun-2021 3:30 PM EDT
New method for molecular functionalization of surfaces
University of Münster

One vision that is currently driving material scientists is to combine organic molecules (and their diverse functionalities) with the technological possibilities offered by extremely sophisticated semiconductor electronics.

Released: 21-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
New Diagnostic Method May Predict Relapse Risk for Those Recovering from Prescription Opioid Addiction
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Rutgers scientists have used a diagnostic technique for the first time in the opioid addiction field that they believe has the potential to determine which opioid-addicted patients are more likely to relapse.

Released: 21-Jun-2021 1:40 PM EDT
NAU Geochemist on New Study Confirming Cause of Greatest Mass Extinction Event
Northern Arizona University

Associate professor Laura Wasylenki co-authored a new paper in Nature Communications that presents the results of nickel isotope analyses on Late Permian sedimentary rocks. The results demonstrate the power of nickel isotope analyses, which are relatively new, to solve long-standing problems in the geosciences.

Newswise: 210613_hypertension_1289_sz-768x532.jpg
Released: 21-Jun-2021 12:40 PM EDT
UCI-led Meta-analysis Identifies Hypertension Medications That Help Ward Off Memory Loss
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., June  21, 2021 — A large-scale meta-analysis led by University of California, Irvine researchers provides the strongest evidence yet of which blood pressure medications help slow memory loss in older adults: those that can travel out of blood vessels and directly into the brain. The findings, published in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, will be of interest to the 91 million Americans whose blood pressure is high enough to warrant medication, as well as the doctors who treat them.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 24-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 21-Jun-2021 12:30 PM EDT

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Newswise: Study Suggests that Smoother Silicone Breast Implants Reduce Severity of Immune System Reactions
Released: 21-Jun-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Study Suggests that Smoother Silicone Breast Implants Reduce Severity of Immune System Reactions
Johns Hopkins Medicine

According to researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Rice University in Houston, silicone breast implants with a smoother surface design have less risk of producing inflammation and other immune system reactions than those with more roughly textured coatings. Results of the experiments using mice, rabbits and samples of human breast tissue advance knowledge of how the body responds to such implants, providing new information to physicians and affirming the benefits of certain smoother surfaces, the researchers say.

Newswise: Researchers develop first inhibitors against key epigenetic complex involved in cancer
Released: 21-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Researchers develop first inhibitors against key epigenetic complex involved in cancer
Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Activity of the polycomb repressive complex 1 is essential for the development and maintenance of leukemic cells; disrupting it presents a new potential therapeutic approach.

16-Jun-2021 7:00 AM EDT
Implantable Brain Device Relieves Pain in Early Study
NYU Langone Health

A computerized brain implant effectively relieves short-term and chronic pain in rodents, a new study finds.

Newswise: Inkjet Printing “Impossible Materials”
17-Jun-2021 10:35 AM EDT
Inkjet Printing “Impossible Materials”
Tufts University

Engineers developed inexpensive methods to make “impossible materials” that interact in unusual ways with microwave energy. Thin film polymers inkjet printed with tiny component patterns collect or transmit energy with much greater selectivity, sensitivity, and power than conventional materials.

Newswise: New Analysis reveals link between birthdays and COVID-19 spread during the height of the pandemic
17-Jun-2021 12:10 PM EDT
New Analysis reveals link between birthdays and COVID-19 spread during the height of the pandemic
Harvard Medical School

Risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection increased 30 percent for households with a recent birthday in counties with high rates of COVID-19 Findings suggest informal social gatherings such as birthday parties played role in infection spread at the height of the coronavirus pandemic No birthday-bash infection jumps seen in areas with low rates of COVID-19 Households with children’s birthdays had greater risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection than with adult birthdays

17-Jun-2021 2:00 PM EDT
Virtual Reality as Pain Relief: Reducing Dressing Change Pain in Pediatric Burn Patients
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Prior studies have investigated alternative approaches to pain reduction in burn injury patients that focus on distraction, such as music, hypnosis, toys, and virtual reality (VR). In a study published today in JAMA Network Open, Henry Xiang, MD, MPH, PhD, MBA, and his research team reported the use of smartphone-based VR games during dressing changes in pediatric patients with burn injuries.

Newswise: Protein Linked to Heart Health, Disease a Potential Therapeutic Target for Dementia
18-Jun-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Protein Linked to Heart Health, Disease a Potential Therapeutic Target for Dementia
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that high levels of a normal protein associated with reduced heart disease also protect against Alzheimer’s-like damage in mice, opening up new approaches to slowing or stopping brain damage and cognitive decline in people with Alzheimer’s.

Newswise: Investigational Alzheimer’s Drug Improves Biomarkers of the Disease
18-Jun-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Investigational Alzheimer’s Drug Improves Biomarkers of the Disease
Washington University in St. Louis

An ongoing international Alzheimer's clinical trial has found that one drug, gantenerumab, improved biomarkers of disease despite unclear cognitive effects, prompting study leaders to offer participants the option of continuing to receive the drug and participate in follow-up examinations as part of a so-called open label extension.

Newswise:Video Embedded the-july-issue-is-out-find-out-the-top-reasons-to-read-the-july-issue-of-diseases-of-the-colon-and-rectum
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Released: 21-Jun-2021 10:45 AM EDT
The July issue is out! Find out the top reasons to read the July issue of Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
Diseases of the Colon and Rectum Journal

The July issue is out! Find out the top reasons to read the July issue of Diseases of the Colon and Rectum.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 22-Jun-2021 7:00 PM EDT Released to reporters: 21-Jun-2021 10:20 AM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 22-Jun-2021 7:00 PM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: COVID-19 dual-antibody therapies effective against variants in animal study
Released: 21-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
COVID-19 dual-antibody therapies effective against variants in animal study
Washington University in St. Louis

A study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that many, but not all, COVID-19 therapies made from combinations of two antibodies are effective against a wide range of virus variants, and that combination therapies appear to prevent the emergence of drug resistance.

Newswise: NIH-Funded Study Shows Children Recycle Brain Regions When Acquiring New Skills
Released: 21-Jun-2021 9:45 AM EDT
NIH-Funded Study Shows Children Recycle Brain Regions When Acquiring New Skills
NIH, National Eye Institute (NEI)

Scientists studied the brain activity of school-aged children during development and found that regions that activated upon seeing limbs (hands, legs, etc.) subsequently activated upon seeing faces or words when the children grew older. The research, by scientists at Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, reveals new insights about vision development in the brain and could help inform prevention and treatment strategies for learning disorders. The study was funded by the National Eye Institute and is published in Nature Human Behaviour.


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