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Newswise: Tom Stanley: He transformed the way we view wealth
Released: 6-May-2021 12:15 PM EDT
Tom Stanley: He transformed the way we view wealth
University of Georgia

It has been a quarter of a century since Thomas Stanley, who received his doctorate in business administration in 1974 from the University of Georgia, wrote the bestselling book “The Millionaire Next Door: The Surprising Secrets of America’s Wealthy.” Co-authored with a former student, William D. Danko, the book’s enduring and timeless message was that many wealthy individuals grew rich on an average salary, through hard work, modest spending, careful saving and taking the occasional calculated risk.

Newswise: Peers Who Boost Marginalized Voices Help Others, and Themselves, Study Shows
Released: 5-May-2021 2:05 PM EDT
Peers Who Boost Marginalized Voices Help Others, and Themselves, Study Shows
University of Notre Dame

For organizations to reach their potential, they must leverage the expertise of their employees. However, research demonstrates that lower-status employees may not be heard because their “voices” are more likely to be ignored. New research from the University of Notre Dame is the first to show that peers can help boost marginalized voices, and at the same time benefit their own status, all while helping their organization realize the potential of its employees’ diverse perspectives.

Released: 5-May-2021 9:50 AM EDT
Seeing Others’ Big Triumphs, We May Feel More Motivated than Usual to Succeed
Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

When we perceive that a peer’s accomplishment has risen above the usual standard of “good work” and can be rated an “exceptional” success, our motivation to learn is enhanced, according to a new study in Academy of Management Discoveries.

Released: 30-Apr-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Managing employee turnover and workload at auditing firms key to maintaining quality, FSU researcher finds
Florida State University

By: Mark Blackwell Thomas | Published: April 30, 2021 | 2:13 pm | SHARE: Heavy workloads and high employee turnover are simply part of business for most auditing firms — but successfully managing these dynamics is key to maintaining quality audits, a Florida State University researcher has found. Nate Newton, assistant professor of accounting in the College of Business, studied one of the top global accounting firms, investigating two key elements of audit teams: workloads and staffing continuity.

Newswise: Justice vs. fairness: Supervisors focused on others’ needs get ‘benefit of the doubt’ from employees, study shows
Released: 26-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Justice vs. fairness: Supervisors focused on others’ needs get ‘benefit of the doubt’ from employees, study shows
University of Notre Dame

In the workplace, whether or not we believe that a supervisor has treated us fairly depends on a number of factors, including motive, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.

Released: 22-Apr-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Business Lessons From European Soccer Turmoil
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

A Super League in European soccer was an idea that was appealing to clubs because of the potential payout, but it ultimately lacked a major part of the equation – the fans, says Maryland Smith marketing professor Henry C. Boyd III.

Newswise: Study finds shifting mindset increases managers’ willingness to invest in new technology
Released: 21-Apr-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Study finds shifting mindset increases managers’ willingness to invest in new technology
Washington University in St. Louis

When faced with a cutting-edge technological idea, business leaders who approach the idea in more concrete terms are more likely to recognize its utility, which increases their propensity to invest, according to new research from the Olin Business School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Newswise: Workplace Communication Study During Pandemic Finds Managers Should Talk Less, Listen More
Released: 12-Apr-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Workplace Communication Study During Pandemic Finds Managers Should Talk Less, Listen More
Baylor University

Managers should listen more, be empathetic and be sure they give feedback — even if they cannot solve a problem immediately, according to a Baylor University study that focused on workplace communication during the pandemic. The crisis highlighted the need for better on-the-job communication with employees now and in the future, when the pandemic recedes, researchers said.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Gender inequality study shows women under-represented on marketing academic journal boards
University of Bath

Women are significantly underrepresented in the editorial boards of marketing academic journals, and awards and recognition favour men, new research from the University of Bath School of Management has found.

Released: 5-Apr-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Study Highlights Benefits of Tax Planning For Companies Facing Financial Constraints
North Carolina State University

A law governing pensions gave business scholars an unprecedented research opportunity to understand the impact of financial constraints.

Released: 25-Mar-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Consumers will dub activist brands as 'woke-washers' if they cannot prove moral competency
City University London

New research shows that consumers judge 'activist brands' based on how morally competent they are perceived to be when challenging free speech.

Released: 24-Mar-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Study Indicates Deliberate Hiring of Unethical Management Accountants
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Dark personality traits -- questionable ethical standards, narcissistic tendencies – are often framed as an accidental byproduct of selecting earnings managers who fit the stereotype of a strong leader. But new research in the Journal of Business Ethics finds this is often no accident.

Released: 17-Mar-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Health Care Consolidation Poses Hazards 'to Health Equity and Larger Health System Goals,' Authors Caution in NEJM Article
Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

Private equity purchases of physician practices may lead to operational improvements and enhanced efficiency that would benefit patients. At the same time, it might harm them by reducing competition and bringing higher prices or lower-quality services, write Bloomberg Distinguished Professor Daniel Polsky of Johns Hopkins University and Assistant Professor Jane Zhu of the Oregon Health and Sciences University, in their commentary titled “Private Equity and Physician Medical Practices – Navigating a Changing Ecosystem.”

Released: 17-Mar-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Not Just For Numbers: Anchoring Biases Decisions Involving Sight, Sound, and Touch
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

New research shows that the marketing communication technique of marketing is not limited to decisions that involve numbers, the use and understanding of which require high-level cognitive thinking. Anchoring also biases judgments at relatively low levels of cognition when no numbers are involved.

Released: 17-Mar-2021 8:55 AM EDT
Marketplace literacy as a pathway to a better world: evidence from field experiments
San Diego State University

If you are a consumer and/or entrepreneur who can make decisions based on cost, competition, supply and demand, you probably possess an element of marketplace literacy.

Newswise: Indiana University Kelley School of Business partners with American Association for Physician Leadership
Released: 15-Mar-2021 10:40 AM EDT
Indiana University Kelley School of Business partners with American Association for Physician Leadership
Indiana University

A new partnership between the American Association for Physician Leadership and the Indiana University Kelley School of Business aims to provide physician leaders with deeper access to business acumen that drives effective change in healthcare.

Released: 11-Mar-2021 10:05 AM EST
Study Shows New Real-Time Method for Identifying Stock Bubbles like GameStop’s
Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School

In a new working paper, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Associate Professor Nicola Fusari and two co-authors propose a new method for determining – in real-time – whether a spike in a stock price is in fact a bubble. They based the method on the options written on a stock during trading.

Newswise:
Released: 10-Mar-2021 5:30 PM EST
"You’re Paid What You’re Worth: and Other Myths of the Modern Economy"
Washington University in St. Louis

Your pay depends on your productivity and occupation. If you earn roughly the same as others in your job, with the precise level determined by your performance, then you're paid market value. And who can question something as objective and impersonal as the market? That, at least, is how many of us tend to think. But, we need to think again, according Jake Rosenfeld, associate professor of sociology at Washington University in St. Louis.

Released: 10-Mar-2021 9:00 AM EST
Star employees get most of the credit and blame while collaborating with non-stars
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Star employees often get most of the credit when things go right, but also shoulder most of the blame when things go wrong, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Released: 3-Mar-2021 9:30 AM EST
UNH Research: No Second Chance to Make Trusting First Impression, or is There?
University of New Hampshire

It's important to make a good first impression and according to research at the University of New Hampshire a positive initial trust interaction is helpful in building a lasting trust relationship. Researchers found that trusting a person early on can have benefits over the life of the relationship, even after a violation of that trust. However, equally interesting was that if people were not trusted during a first meeting, there were still opportunities to build trust in the future.

Newswise: Disclosure rules led to drop in bond trading markups
Released: 2-Mar-2021 5:45 PM EST
Disclosure rules led to drop in bond trading markups
University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business

The average transaction fee paid by retail investors to buy or sell corporate bonds fell 5% after regulators forced brokers to disclose these fees, according to new research co-authored by Berkeley Haas Asst. Prof. Omri Even-Tov.

Released: 1-Mar-2021 4:45 PM EST
New Ideas to Solve America’s Housing Affordability Crisis
Sorenson Impact Center, David Eccles School of Business, University of Utah

Today, Ivory Innovations announced the Top 25 finalists for the 2021 Ivory Prize for Housing Affordability . Now in its third year, the Ivory Prize is an annual award recognizing ambitious, feasible, and scalable solutions to housing affordability across three distinct categories: finance, construction and design, and public policy and regulatory reform.

Released: 25-Feb-2021 11:10 AM EST
European unions’ support varies for precarious workers
Cornell University

In many cases, unions in Europe have helped nonunionized workers whose jobs are precarious, according to new Cornell University research.

Released: 23-Feb-2021 7:05 AM EST
University Hospitals named for the ninth time as one of the World’s Most Ethical Companies by Ethisphere
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Announcement that University Hospitals (UH) has been recognized by Ethisphere, a global leader in defining and advancing the standards of ethical business practices, as one of 2021 World’s Most Ethical Companies. UH is one of only seven honorees in the health care providers’ category, in 2021.

Newswise: CEOs should develop an ambivalent mindsetin crises, says UAH professor’s research
Released: 22-Feb-2021 11:25 AM EST
CEOs should develop an ambivalent mindsetin crises, says UAH professor’s research
University of Alabama Huntsville

When their companies face crises like disruptive changes, the way chief executive officers (CEOs) perceive or interpret the crises matter for their companies’ adaptation to the changes, according to research by a University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) associate professor of marketing.

Newswise: What the Maker Faire’s hackers and hula hoopers can teach us about building diverse teams
Released: 22-Feb-2021 9:00 AM EST
What the Maker Faire’s hackers and hula hoopers can teach us about building diverse teams
University of California, Berkeley Haas School of Business

In an age of Zoom fatigue, it may be tempting to ditch those silly team-building activities that elicit eye-rolls and groans at many a staff meeting.

Newswise: Humble pie: soul food for the best leaders
18-Feb-2021 11:05 PM EST
Humble pie: soul food for the best leaders
University of South Australia

When it comes to the best leaders, a slice of humble pie might be just what the CEO ordered, as research from the University of South Australia shows that humility is a critical leadership trait for cultivating cohesive, high performing teams.

Released: 19-Feb-2021 8:00 AM EST
U.S. News & World Report ranks Wichita State University online business program No. 7 in the nation
Wichita State University

Wichita State University is tied for No. 7 nationally in Best Online Bachelor’s in Business Programs by U.S. News & World Report.

Released: 18-Feb-2021 12:55 PM EST
Study finds no gender discrimination when leaders use confident language
Washington State University

People tend to listen to big talkers, whether they are women or men. Still, more women prefer not to use assertive language, according to a new study led by Washington State University economist Shanthi Manian.

Released: 17-Feb-2021 10:10 AM EST
How to shift from confrontation to negotiation in 2021
University of Illinois at Chicago

Research suggests that as businesses become more global — with mergers, acquisitions and partnerships — it’s increasingly important to understand the nuances of the entire negotiation process.

Released: 16-Feb-2021 1:15 PM EST
Leaders valued over managers, regardless of fit
Cornell University

Leaders tend to be loved more than managers, reflecting an implicit societal bias that may be tempered by thinking critically about it, new Cornell University-led research suggests.

Released: 15-Feb-2021 11:10 AM EST
Experts to Discuss the Impact of Finance on Society
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

Academics William N. Goetzmann (Yale) and Russell Wermers (University of Maryland) will explore the past, present and future of financial technologies and institutions affecting society in “Does Money Change Everything,” a free, Feb. 17 webinar hosted by Maryland Smith.

Newswise: New Insights for Effective Financial Education Using Intuit’s Mint
Released: 10-Feb-2021 10:40 AM EST
New Insights for Effective Financial Education Using Intuit’s Mint
George Washington University

A new report from the Global Financial Literacy Excellence Center at the George Washington University School of Business and Intuit, the global financial management platform, offers findings that can help educators better create effective financial education programs.

Newswise: Women are more likely to work under, and violate, pay secrecy policies
Released: 9-Feb-2021 11:30 AM EST
Women are more likely to work under, and violate, pay secrecy policies
Washington University in St. Louis

It has been more than half a century since the landmark Equal Pay Act passed, yet the gender pay gap still exists. On average, women make 18% less than their male counterparts. Lack of transparency in pay contributes to the disparity, according to a Washington University in St. Louis sociologist.

Released: 8-Feb-2021 3:35 PM EST
Maryland Smith Unveils Flex MBA for Part-Time Students
University of Maryland, Robert H. Smith School of Business

The University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business has designed a Flex MBA program augmented with special topic seminars and completable within 24 months through the school’s Baltimore, Rockville and Washington, D.C. locations.

Newswise: Good customer service can lead to higher profits, even for utilities without competition
Released: 2-Feb-2021 9:25 AM EST
Good customer service can lead to higher profits, even for utilities without competition
Indiana University

New research finds that satisfied customers mean increased profits even for public utilities that don’t face competition. Professors found that customer satisfaction does not lead to increased profits via higher rates or greater demand suggests current regulatory controls are effective. Their findings suggest regulators should view investments in customer satisfaction as recoverable costs.

Released: 26-Jan-2021 2:10 PM EST
Cannabis use both helps and hurts entrepreneurial creativity
Washington State University

When entrepreneurs dream up ideas for new businesses, cannabis use might help, and hinder, their creativity, according to a new study in the Journal of Business Venturing by Washington State University researchers.

Released: 26-Jan-2021 1:35 PM EST
Price is ripe: Study finds increase in menu prices means decrease in restaurant ratings
Washington University in St. Louis

A pair of business researchers, from Washington University in St. Louis and Harvard University, studied the relationship between price and reputation. What they found: Ratings are price-adjusted rather than objective reviews of quality.


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