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Embargo will expire: 11-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 7-May-2021 3:40 PM EDT

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access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 13-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 6-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT

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Released: 5-May-2021 11:05 AM EDT
UCI biomedical engineers spotlight disparities in knee and jaw joint treatments
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., May 5, 2021 – If you haven’t had knee surgery, you may have a friend or relative who has. But do you know anyone who has had an operation on their jaw? Although the temporomandibular joint is crucial to speaking, chewing and even breathing, treatments for TMJ disorders are far less common than those for the knee.

Newswise:Video Embedded the-enzyme-that-could-help-700-million-people-worldwide
VIDEO
Released: 3-May-2021 8:05 PM EDT
The enzyme that could help 700 million people worldwide
University of South Australia

University of South Australia researchers have identified an enzyme that may help to curb chronic kidney disease, which affects approximately 700 million people worldwide.

Newswise: How SARS-CoV-2 Hijacks Human Cells to Evade Immune System
Released: 28-Apr-2021 3:25 PM EDT
How SARS-CoV-2 Hijacks Human Cells to Evade Immune System
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered one way in which SARS-CoV-2 hijacks human cell machinery to blunt the immune response, allowing it to establish infection, replicate and cause disease.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Scientists create first-of-its-kind 3D organoid model of the human pancreas
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers have successfully created the first 3D organoid models of the pancreas from human stem cells. This first-of-its-kind organoid model includes both the acinar and ductal structures that play a critical role in the majority of pancreatic cancers.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 28-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Newswise: Hepatitis C Drugs Combined with Remdesivir Show Strong Effectiveness Against COVID-19
Released: 27-Apr-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Hepatitis C Drugs Combined with Remdesivir Show Strong Effectiveness Against COVID-19
Mount Sinai Health System

A combination of remdesivir, a drug currently approved in the United States for treating COVID-19 patients, and repurposed drugs for hepatitis C virus (HCV) was 10 times more effective at inhibiting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Hepatitis C Drugs Multiply Effect of COVID-19 Antiviral Remdesivir
Released: 27-Apr-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Hepatitis C Drugs Multiply Effect of COVID-19 Antiviral Remdesivir
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

When combined with drugs currently used to treat hepatitis C, the antiviral remdesivir is 10 times more effective in treating cells infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

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Released: 20-Apr-2021 12:15 PM EDT
The British variant is 45% more contagious than the original virus
Tel Aviv University

A new study at Tel Aviv University found that the British variant (termed: B.1.1.7) of Covid-19 is 45% more contagious than the original virus.

Released: 19-Apr-2021 5:40 PM EDT
Supplement treats schizophrenia in mice, restores healthy "dance" and structure of neurons
University of Tokyo

A simple dietary supplement reduces behavioral symptoms in mice with a genetic mutation that causes schizophrenia.

Newswise: Experimental Drug Shows Potential Against Alzheimer’s Disease
16-Apr-2021 5:15 PM EDT
Experimental Drug Shows Potential Against Alzheimer’s Disease
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have designed an experimental drug that reversed key symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in mice. The drug works by reinvigorating a cellular cleaning mechanism that gets rid of unwanted proteins by digesting and recycling them. The study was published online today in the journal Cell.

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Released: 14-Apr-2021 12:10 PM EDT
A novel, quick, and easy system for genetic analysis of SARS-CoV-2
Osaka University

SARS-CoV-2 is the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: Why Patients with Severe Asthma May be Resistant to Corticosteroid Therapy
Released: 13-Apr-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Why Patients with Severe Asthma May be Resistant to Corticosteroid Therapy
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Wheezing, coughing that doesn’t stop, a pale and sweaty face: clinically, severe asthma attacks look very similar from patient to patient. But biologically, not all severe asthma is the same—and a team of scientists has, for the first time, identified the key difference in people, a finding that has important implications for treatment.

Newswise: Researchers Discover New Way to Monitor and Prevent Nerve Cell Deterioration after Brain Injury
Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Researchers Discover New Way to Monitor and Prevent Nerve Cell Deterioration after Brain Injury
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Potential mechanistic link shown between Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer’s disease

Newswise: Chemical modification of RNA could play key role in polycystic kidney disease
13-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Chemical modification of RNA could play key role in polycystic kidney disease
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A chemical modification of RNA that can be influenced by diet appears to play a key role in polycystic kidney disease, an inherited disorder that is the fourth leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S., UT Southwestern researchers report in a new study. The findings, published online today in Cell Metabolism, suggest new ways to treat this incurable condition.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
MicroRNA-29: A Key Controller of Brain Development, Disease
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

A team led by scientists at the UNC School of Medicine identified a molecule called microRNA-29 as a powerful controller of brain maturation in mammals.

5-Apr-2021 7:30 AM EDT
Brain Cells Decide on Their Own When to Release Pleasure Hormone
NYU Langone Health

In addition to smoothing out wrinkles, researchers have found that the drug Botox can reveal the inner workings of the brain. A new study used it to show that feedback from individual nerve cells controls the release of dopamine, a chemical messenger involved in motivation, memory, and movement.

Released: 1-Apr-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Gut microbiota in cesarean-born babies catches up
University of Gothenburg

Infants born by cesarean section have a relatively meager array of bacteria in the gut. But by the age of three to five years they are broadly in line with their peers.

Released: 1-Apr-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Early-Career Editors join the board of Molecular Biology of the Cell journal
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) is proud to announce the selection of 24 Early-Career Editors to join the board of Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC). This new group of pre-tenure faculty and postdocs will be responsible for highlighting preprints posted on bioRxiv.

Released: 30-Mar-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Globally Accessible Therapy Is Found to Protect Against Lethal Inflammation from COVID-19 in Animal Models
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers have found that a widely available and inexpensive drug targeting inflammatory genes has reduced morbidity and mortality in mice infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Released: 30-Mar-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Kids’ metabolic health can be improved with exercise during pregnancy: here’s why
Joslin Diabetes Center

BOSTON – (March 25, 2021) – A mechanism has been identified that explains how physical exercise in pregnancy confers metabolic health benefits in offspring. According to researchers, the key lies with a protein called SOD3, vitamin D and adequate exercise, with the outcomes possibly forming the first steps to designing rational diet and exercise programs to use during pregnancy and particularly when mothers may also be overweight or obese.

Newswise: Scientists Identify Molecular Pathway That Helps Moving Cells Avoid Aimless Wandering
Released: 30-Mar-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Scientists Identify Molecular Pathway That Helps Moving Cells Avoid Aimless Wandering
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Working with fruit flies, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have identified a new molecular pathway that helps steer moving cells in specific directions. The set of interconnected proteins and enzymes in the pathway act as steering and rudder components that drive cells toward an “intended” rather than random destination, they say.

Released: 29-Mar-2021 3:20 PM EDT
Protein rewires metabolism to block cancer cell death, may allow cancer spread
University of Notre Dame

One specific protein may be a master regulator for changing how cancer cells consume nutrients from their environments, preventing cell death and increasing the likelihood the cancer could spread, a study from the University of Notre Dame has shown.

Released: 26-Mar-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Signals from muscle protect from dementia
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

How do different parts of the body communicate? Scientists at St. Jude are studying how signals sent from skeletal muscle affect the brain.

Released: 26-Mar-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Cancer Drug Lessens the Toxicity of a Protein from Virus that Causes COVID-19
University of Maryland Medical Center

University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers have identified the most toxic proteins made by SARS-COV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19 – and then used an FDA-approved cancer drug to blunt the viral protein’s detrimental effects.

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Released: 25-Mar-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Study reveals how long-term infection and inflammation impairs immune response as we age
Texas Children's Hospital

Humans are born with tens of thousands of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that collectively ensure lifelong production of blood and immune cells that protect us from infections.

Newswise: The a7 Protein is Ready For Its Close-Up
Released: 17-Mar-2021 12:00 PM EDT
The a7 Protein is Ready For Its Close-Up
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – March 17, 2021 – UT Southwestern researchers have identified the structure of a key member of a family of proteins called nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in three different shapes. The work, published online today in Cell, could eventually lead to new pharmaceutical treatments for a large range of diseases or infections including schizophrenia, lung cancer, and even COVID-19.

Released: 16-Mar-2021 12:15 PM EDT
New Study Shows How Mutations in SARS-CoV-2 Allow the Virus to Evade Immune System Defenses
Harvard Medical School

Research reveals how mutated SARS-CoV-2 evades immune system defenses In lab-dish experiments, the mutant virus escaped antibodies from the plasma of COVID-19 survivors as well as pharmaceutical-grade antibodies Mutations arose in an immunocompromised patient with chronic SARS-CoV-2 infection Patient-derived virus harbored structural changes now seen cropping up independently in samples across the globe Findings underscore the need for better genomic surveillance to keep track of emerging variants Results highlight importance of therapies aimed at multiple targets on SARS-CoV-2 to minimize risk of resistance

Released: 16-Mar-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Researchers Find a Better Way to Measure Consciousness
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Millions of people are administered general anesthesia each year in the United States alone, but it’s not always easy to tell whether they are actually unconscious. A small proportion of those patients regain some awareness during medical procedures, but a new study of the brain activity that represents consciousness could prevent that potential trauma.

Newswise: Exploring Amino Acids Signaling as Intervention for Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancers
11-Mar-2021 3:55 PM EST
Exploring Amino Acids Signaling as Intervention for Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancers
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Researchers from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey previously identified a small protein called Rab1A that regulates amino acid signaling. In a recent study, researchers explored the physiological role of Rab1A in mammals using mice though a technique in which one of an organism's genes is made inoperative, known as genetic knockout.

Newswise: CHOP Researchers Find Ribosome Assembly Essential for Stem Cell Regeneration
10-Mar-2021 11:05 AM EST
CHOP Researchers Find Ribosome Assembly Essential for Stem Cell Regeneration
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified genes responsible for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) regeneration via the assembly of the ribosome, the protein factories in cells that translate mRNA sequences into amino acid sequences. The findings, which were published in Cell Stem Cell, highlight the importance of proper ribosome assembly in stem cell regeneration and identify possible targets for future therapies for ribosomopathies, childhood disorders that lead to bone marrow failure (BMF).

Newswise: Putting A Protein Into Overdrive to Heal Spinal Cord Injuries
2-Mar-2021 2:30 PM EST
Putting A Protein Into Overdrive to Heal Spinal Cord Injuries
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Using genetic engineering, researchers at UT Southwestern and Indiana University have reprogrammed scar-forming cells in mouse spinal cords to create new nerve cells, spurring recovery after spinal cord injury. The findings, published online today in Cell Stem Cell, could offer hope for the hundreds of thousands of people worldwide who suffer a spinal cord injury each year.

Newswise: Belly fat resistant to every-other-day fasting: study
1-Mar-2021 9:30 AM EST
Belly fat resistant to every-other-day fasting: study
University of Sydney

Scientists have mapped out what happens to fat deposits during intermittent fasting (every second day), with an unexpected discovery that some types of fat are more resistant to weight loss.

Newswise: Researchers map metabolic signaling machinery for producing memory T cells
Released: 25-Feb-2021 11:45 AM EST
Researchers map metabolic signaling machinery for producing memory T cells
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Discovery of a metabolic pathways that inhibit memory T cell production has potential for enhancing the immune system’s ability to fight infections and cancers.

Newswise: Antibodies Recognize and Attack Different SARS-CoV-2 Spike Shapes
22-Feb-2021 7:00 AM EST
Antibodies Recognize and Attack Different SARS-CoV-2 Spike Shapes
Biophysical Society

ROCKVILLE, MD – The virus that causes COVID-19 belongs to the family of coronaviruses, “corona” referring to the spikes on the viral surface.

Released: 18-Feb-2021 1:30 PM EST
Scientists identify over 140,000 virus species in the human gut
Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Viruses are the most numerous biological entities on the planet. Now researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and EMBL's European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) have identified over 140,000 viral species living in the human gut, more than half of which have never been seen before.

Newswise: Researchers take early step toward leukemia drug therapy
Released: 16-Feb-2021 1:55 PM EST
Researchers take early step toward leukemia drug therapy
McMaster University

The research team has discovered that for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, there is a dopamine receptor pathway that becomes abnormally activated in the cancer stem cells. This inspired the clinical investigation of a dopamine receptor-inhibiting drug thioridazine as a new therapy for patients, and their focus on adult AML has revealed encouraging results.

Released: 16-Feb-2021 12:45 PM EST
Antibody-based COVID-19 treatments work best in concert with immune cells
Washington University in St. Louis

Antibody-based drugs have been authorized for emergency use in COVID-19 patients by the Food and Drug Administration. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that the ability to interact with other elements of the immune system is an indispensable part of the effectiveness of such antibodies. The findings could help improve the design of the next generation of antibody-based COVID-19 drugs.

Newswise:Video Embedded a-cheap-potent-pathway-to-pandemic-therapeutics
VIDEO
11-Feb-2021 1:45 PM EST
A Cheap, Potent Pathway to Pandemic Therapeutics
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

By capitalizing on a convergence of chemical, biological and artificial intelligence advances, scientists have developed an unusually fast and efficient method for discovering tiny antibody fragments with big potential for development into therapeutics against deadly diseases.

Newswise: New immunotherapy target discovered for malignant brain tumors
11-Feb-2021 4:05 PM EST
New immunotherapy target discovered for malignant brain tumors
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Scientists say they have discovered a potential new target for immunotherapy of malignant brain tumors, which so far have resisted the ground-breaking cancer treatment based on harnessing the body’s immune system. The discovery, reported in the journal CELL, emerged from laboratory experiments and has no immediate implications for treating patients.

Released: 15-Feb-2021 8:00 AM EST
TB study reveals potential targets to treat and control infection using cutting-edge technology
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

Researchers at the Southwest National Primate Research Center (SNPRC) at Texas Biomedical Research Institute (Texas Biomed) may have found a new pathway to treat and control tuberculosis (TB), the disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Using single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq), a next-generation sequencing technology, scientists were able to further define the mechanisms that lead to TB infection and latency.

4-Feb-2021 2:25 PM EST
Mount Sinai-Led Team Builds First Model of the Progression of Acute Myeloid Leukemia using CRISPR
Mount Sinai Health System

A research team led by the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (Icahn Mount Sinai) has built the first cellular model to depict the evolution of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), from its early to late stages. By using gene editing technologies to alter genes that make cells malignant, the team was able to identify potential therapeutic targets for early disease stages. The study was reported in the journal Cell Stem Cell in February.

Newswise: Two Studies Shed Light on How, Where Body Can Add New Fat Cells
Released: 3-Feb-2021 11:00 AM EST
Two Studies Shed Light on How, Where Body Can Add New Fat Cells
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – Feb. 3, 2021 – Gaining more fat cells is probably not what most people want, although that might be exactly what they need to fight off diabetes and other diseases. How and where the body can add fat cells has remained a mystery – but two new studies from UT Southwestern provide answers on the way this process works.

1-Feb-2021 9:30 AM EST
Stem Cell Study Illuminates the Cause of a Devastating Inherited Heart Disorder
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Stem cell study findings show that LMNA gene mutations can disrupt the “identity” of heart muscle cells

Released: 29-Jan-2021 10:15 AM EST
Noninvasive blood test tracks organ injury from COVID-19
Cornell University

A Cornell-led collaboration has developed a noninvasive blood test that uses cell-free DNA to gauge the damage that COVID-19 inflicts on cells, tissues and organs, and could help aid in the development of new therapies.

Newswise: How does the immune system keep tabs on the brain?
25-Jan-2021 5:30 PM EST
How does the immune system keep tabs on the brain?
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that immune cells stationed in sinuses in the meninges — the covering of the brain and spinal cord — monitor the brain and initiate an immune response if they detect a problem.

Released: 26-Jan-2021 3:20 PM EST
SARS-CoV-2 reacts to antibodies of virus from 2003 SARS outbreak, new study reveals
Oregon Health & Science University

A new study demonstrates that antibodies generated by the novel coronavirus react to other strains of coronavirus and vice versa, according to research published today by scientists from Oregon Health & Science University.

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Released: 26-Jan-2021 3:10 PM EST
At three days old, newborn mice remember their moms
Cell Press

For mice, the earliest social memories can form at three days old and last into adulthood, scientists report on January 26 in the journal Cell Reports.

Newswise: Two Anti-viral Enzymes Transform Pre-Leukemia Stem Cells into Leukemia
Released: 26-Jan-2021 2:40 PM EST
Two Anti-viral Enzymes Transform Pre-Leukemia Stem Cells into Leukemia
University of California San Diego Health

Viral infections and space travel similarly trigger inflammation and the enzymes APOBEC3C and ADAR1; UC San Diego researchers are developing ways to inhibit them as a means to potentially lower cancer risk for both astronauts and people on Earth.


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