Curated News: Cell (journal)

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Newswise: Immune system protein may defend against deadly intestinal disease in babies
Released: 17-Jun-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Immune system protein may defend against deadly intestinal disease in babies
Washington University in St. Louis

A study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified a protein in the immune system that may protect babies from necrotizing enterocolitis, a leading cause of death among premature infants.

15-Jun-2021 2:05 PM EDT
New Cleveland Clinic Research Identifies Link Between Gut Microbes and Stroke
Cleveland Clinic

New findings from Cleveland Clinic researchers show for the first time that the gut microbiome impacts stroke severity and functional impairment following stroke. The results, published in Cell Host & Microbe, lay the groundwork for potential new interventions to help treat or prevent stroke. The research was led by Weifei Zhu, Ph.D., and Stanley Hazen, M.D., Ph.D., of Cleveland Clinic’s Lerner Research Institute.

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Released: 15-Jun-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Obesity and hypertension: Researchers discover novel mechanisms
Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health

Hypertension is a widespread comorbidity of patients with obesity that greatly increases the risk of mortality and disability.

Newswise:Video Embedded what-makes-us-sneeze
VIDEO
14-Jun-2021 5:20 PM EDT
What makes us sneeze?
Washington University in St. Louis

What exactly triggers a sneeze? A team led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified, in mice, specific cells and proteins that control the sneeze reflex. Better understanding of what causes us to sneeze — specifically how neurons behave in response to allergens and viruses — may point to treatments capable of slowing the spread of infectious respiratory diseases.

Newswise: Ludwig Cancer Research Study Shows How Certain Macrophages Dampen Anti-Tumor Immunity
10-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Ludwig Cancer Research Study Shows How Certain Macrophages Dampen Anti-Tumor Immunity
Ludwig Cancer Research

A Ludwig Cancer Research study adds to growing evidence that immune cells known as macrophages inhabiting the body cavities that house our vital organs can aid tumor growth by distracting the immune system’s cancer-killing CD8+ T cells. Reported in the current issue of Cancer Cell and led by Ludwig investigators Taha Merghoub and Jedd Wolchok at Memorial Sloan Kettering (MSK) and Charles Rudin of MSK, the study shows that cavity-resident macrophages express high levels of Tim-4, a receptor for phosphatidylserine (PS), a molecule that they surprisingly found on the surface of highly activated, cytotoxic and proliferative CD8+ T-cells.

9-Jun-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Could Neutrophils be the Secret to Cancer’s Achilles’ Heel?
University of Chicago Medical Center

A study published in the June 10, 2021 issue of Cell describes a remarkable new mechanism by which the body’s own immune system can eliminate cancer cells without damaging host cells. The findings have the potential to develop first-in-class medicines that are designed to be selective for cancer cells and non-toxic to normal cells and tissues.

Newswise: Single gene boosts climate resilience, yield and carbon capture in crops
Released: 3-Jun-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Single gene boosts climate resilience, yield and carbon capture in crops
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have discovered a single gene that simultaneously boosts plant growth and tolerance for stresses such as drought and salt, all while tackling the root cause of climate change by enabling plants to pull more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Newswise: Diet Plays Critical Role in NASH Progressing to Liver Cancer in Mouse Model
Released: 1-Jun-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Diet Plays Critical Role in NASH Progressing to Liver Cancer in Mouse Model
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found in a mouse model that when fed a Western diet rich in calories, fat and cholesterol, the mice progressively became obese, diabetic and developed NASH, which progressed to HCC, chronic kidney and cardiovascular disease.

25-May-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Global Study Finds Each City Has Unique Microbiome Fingerprint of Bacteria and Viruses
University of Maryland Medical Center

Each city has its own unique microbiome, a "fingerprint" of viruses and bacteria that uniquely identify it, according to a new study from an international consortium of researchers that included a team from the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM). The international project, which sequenced and analyzed samples collected from public transit systems and hospitals in 60 cities around the world, was published today in the journal Cell.

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Released: 26-May-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Study shows SARS-CoV-2 variants unlikely to affect T cell responses
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

In a new study, scientists at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) have revealed that most T cell epitopes known to be targeted upon natural infection are seemingly unaffected by current SARS-CoV-2 variants.

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Released: 26-May-2021 3:10 PM EDT
NIH scientists find that salmonella use intestinal epithelial cells to colonize the gut
NIH, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

The immune system's attempt to eliminate Salmonella bacteria from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract instead facilitates colonization of the intestinal tract and fecal shedding, according to National Institutes of Health scientists.

Newswise: How Human Cells And Pathogenic Shigella Engage in Battle
Released: 21-May-2021 12:55 PM EDT
How Human Cells And Pathogenic Shigella Engage in Battle
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – May 21, 2021 – One member of a large protein family that is known to stop the spread of bacterial infections by prompting infected human cells to self-destruct appears to kill the infectious bacteria instead, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists shows. However, some bacteria have their own mechanism to thwart this attack, nullifying the deadly protein by tagging it for destruction.

Newswise: Western diet may increase risk of gut inflammation, infection
17-May-2021 3:35 PM EDT
Western diet may increase risk of gut inflammation, infection
Washington University in St. Louis

Eating a Western diet impairs the immune system in the gut in ways that could increase risk of infection and inflammatory bowel disease, according to a study from researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Cleveland Clinic.

Newswise: Wistar and Peter Mac Scientists Discover Fundamental Mechanism That Fine-tunes Gene Expression and Is Disrupted in Cancer
Released: 17-May-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Wistar and Peter Mac Scientists Discover Fundamental Mechanism That Fine-tunes Gene Expression and Is Disrupted in Cancer
Wistar Institute

A team of scientists from The Wistar Institute in Philadelphia and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Center in Melbourne, Australia, discovered a new checkpoint mechanism that fine-tunes gene transcription.

Released: 17-May-2021 9:40 AM EDT
Comprehensive Mount Sinai Study Shows Direct Evidence That COVID-19 Can Infect Cells in Eye
Mount Sinai Health System

Study Has Implications for Preventive Measures to Slow Spread of Virus

Released: 13-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Cancer has ripple effect on distant tissues
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study with zebrafish shows that a deadly form of skin cancer — melanoma — alters the metabolism of healthy tissues elsewhere in the body. The research from Washington University in St. Louis suggests that these other tissues could potentially be targeted to help treat cancer.“Tumors rely on a constant supply of nutrients to grow.

6-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Food Dyes May Cause Disease When the Immune System is Dysregulated, Mount Sinai Researchers Report
Mount Sinai Health System

Artificial food colorants can cause disease when the immune system has become dysregulated, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai researchers report. The study, published in Cell Metabolism in May, was the first to show this phenomenon.

Newswise: For the Brain, Timing Is Everything
7-May-2021 3:40 PM EDT
For the Brain, Timing Is Everything
Columbia University School of Engineering and Applied Science

New study from Joshua Jacobs (Columbia Engineering) and Itzhak Fried (UCLA) demonstrates the existence of phase precession in the human brain for the first time, and shows that this neural code not only links sequential positions, as in animals, but also abstract progression towards specific goals. Says lead author Salman Qasim, “We were convinced that phase precession held a lot of promise as a widespread neural code that could be used for learning and cognition.”

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Released: 10-May-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Errors at the start of life
Max Planck Society (Max-Planck-Gesellschaft)

Only one in three fertilizations leads to a successful pregnancy. Many embryos fail to progress beyond early development.

Released: 5-May-2021 11:05 AM EDT
UCI biomedical engineers spotlight disparities in knee and jaw joint treatments
University of California, Irvine

Irvine, Calif., May 5, 2021 – If you haven’t had knee surgery, you may have a friend or relative who has. But do you know anyone who has had an operation on their jaw? Although the temporomandibular joint is crucial to speaking, chewing and even breathing, treatments for TMJ disorders are far less common than those for the knee.

Newswise:Video Embedded the-enzyme-that-could-help-700-million-people-worldwide
VIDEO
Released: 3-May-2021 8:05 PM EDT
The enzyme that could help 700 million people worldwide
University of South Australia

University of South Australia researchers have identified an enzyme that may help to curb chronic kidney disease, which affects approximately 700 million people worldwide.

Newswise: How SARS-CoV-2 Hijacks Human Cells to Evade Immune System
Released: 28-Apr-2021 3:25 PM EDT
How SARS-CoV-2 Hijacks Human Cells to Evade Immune System
University of California San Diego Health

UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers discovered one way in which SARS-CoV-2 hijacks human cell machinery to blunt the immune response, allowing it to establish infection, replicate and cause disease.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 11:25 AM EDT
Scientists create first-of-its-kind 3D organoid model of the human pancreas
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

Researchers have successfully created the first 3D organoid models of the pancreas from human stem cells. This first-of-its-kind organoid model includes both the acinar and ductal structures that play a critical role in the majority of pancreatic cancers.

Newswise: Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Released: 28-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Johns Hopkins Medicine

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Johns Hopkins Medicine Media Relations is focused on disseminating current, accurate and useful information to the public via the media. As part of that effort, we are distributing our “COVID-19 Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins” every other Wednesday.

Newswise: Hepatitis C Drugs Combined with Remdesivir Show Strong Effectiveness Against COVID-19
Released: 27-Apr-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Hepatitis C Drugs Combined with Remdesivir Show Strong Effectiveness Against COVID-19
Mount Sinai Health System

A combination of remdesivir, a drug currently approved in the United States for treating COVID-19 patients, and repurposed drugs for hepatitis C virus (HCV) was 10 times more effective at inhibiting SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Hepatitis C Drugs Multiply Effect of COVID-19 Antiviral Remdesivir
Released: 27-Apr-2021 10:45 AM EDT
Hepatitis C Drugs Multiply Effect of COVID-19 Antiviral Remdesivir
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

When combined with drugs currently used to treat hepatitis C, the antiviral remdesivir is 10 times more effective in treating cells infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Experimental Drug Shows Potential Against Alzheimer’s Disease
16-Apr-2021 5:15 PM EDT
Experimental Drug Shows Potential Against Alzheimer’s Disease
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have designed an experimental drug that reversed key symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in mice. The drug works by reinvigorating a cellular cleaning mechanism that gets rid of unwanted proteins by digesting and recycling them. The study was published online today in the journal Cell.

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Released: 20-Apr-2021 12:15 PM EDT
The British variant is 45% more contagious than the original virus
Tel Aviv University

A new study at Tel Aviv University found that the British variant (termed: B.1.1.7) of Covid-19 is 45% more contagious than the original virus.

Released: 19-Apr-2021 5:40 PM EDT
Supplement treats schizophrenia in mice, restores healthy "dance" and structure of neurons
University of Tokyo

A simple dietary supplement reduces behavioral symptoms in mice with a genetic mutation that causes schizophrenia.

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Released: 14-Apr-2021 12:10 PM EDT
A novel, quick, and easy system for genetic analysis of SARS-CoV-2
Osaka University

SARS-CoV-2 is the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Newswise: Why Patients with Severe Asthma May be Resistant to Corticosteroid Therapy
Released: 13-Apr-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Why Patients with Severe Asthma May be Resistant to Corticosteroid Therapy
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Wheezing, coughing that doesn’t stop, a pale and sweaty face: clinically, severe asthma attacks look very similar from patient to patient. But biologically, not all severe asthma is the same—and a team of scientists has, for the first time, identified the key difference in people, a finding that has important implications for treatment.

Newswise: Researchers Discover New Way to Monitor and Prevent Nerve Cell Deterioration after Brain Injury
Released: 13-Apr-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Researchers Discover New Way to Monitor and Prevent Nerve Cell Deterioration after Brain Injury
University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center

Potential mechanistic link shown between Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer’s disease

Newswise: Chemical modification of RNA could play key role in polycystic kidney disease
13-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Chemical modification of RNA could play key role in polycystic kidney disease
UT Southwestern Medical Center

A chemical modification of RNA that can be influenced by diet appears to play a key role in polycystic kidney disease, an inherited disorder that is the fourth leading cause of kidney failure in the U.S., UT Southwestern researchers report in a new study. The findings, published online today in Cell Metabolism, suggest new ways to treat this incurable condition.

Released: 7-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
MicroRNA-29: A Key Controller of Brain Development, Disease
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

A team led by scientists at the UNC School of Medicine identified a molecule called microRNA-29 as a powerful controller of brain maturation in mammals.

5-Apr-2021 7:30 AM EDT
Brain Cells Decide on Their Own When to Release Pleasure Hormone
NYU Langone Health

In addition to smoothing out wrinkles, researchers have found that the drug Botox can reveal the inner workings of the brain. A new study used it to show that feedback from individual nerve cells controls the release of dopamine, a chemical messenger involved in motivation, memory, and movement.

Released: 1-Apr-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Gut microbiota in cesarean-born babies catches up
University of Gothenburg

Infants born by cesarean section have a relatively meager array of bacteria in the gut. But by the age of three to five years they are broadly in line with their peers.

Released: 1-Apr-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Early-Career Editors join the board of Molecular Biology of the Cell journal
American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB)

The American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) is proud to announce the selection of 24 Early-Career Editors to join the board of Molecular Biology of the Cell (MBoC). This new group of pre-tenure faculty and postdocs will be responsible for highlighting preprints posted on bioRxiv.

Released: 30-Mar-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Globally Accessible Therapy Is Found to Protect Against Lethal Inflammation from COVID-19 in Animal Models
Mount Sinai Health System

Mount Sinai researchers have found that a widely available and inexpensive drug targeting inflammatory genes has reduced morbidity and mortality in mice infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Released: 30-Mar-2021 11:30 AM EDT
Kids’ metabolic health can be improved with exercise during pregnancy: here’s why
Joslin Diabetes Center

BOSTON – (March 25, 2021) – A mechanism has been identified that explains how physical exercise in pregnancy confers metabolic health benefits in offspring. According to researchers, the key lies with a protein called SOD3, vitamin D and adequate exercise, with the outcomes possibly forming the first steps to designing rational diet and exercise programs to use during pregnancy and particularly when mothers may also be overweight or obese.

Newswise: Scientists Identify Molecular Pathway That Helps Moving Cells Avoid Aimless Wandering
Released: 30-Mar-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Scientists Identify Molecular Pathway That Helps Moving Cells Avoid Aimless Wandering
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Working with fruit flies, scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have identified a new molecular pathway that helps steer moving cells in specific directions. The set of interconnected proteins and enzymes in the pathway act as steering and rudder components that drive cells toward an “intended” rather than random destination, they say.

Released: 29-Mar-2021 3:20 PM EDT
Protein rewires metabolism to block cancer cell death, may allow cancer spread
University of Notre Dame

One specific protein may be a master regulator for changing how cancer cells consume nutrients from their environments, preventing cell death and increasing the likelihood the cancer could spread, a study from the University of Notre Dame has shown.

Released: 26-Mar-2021 3:15 PM EDT
Signals from muscle protect from dementia
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

How do different parts of the body communicate? Scientists at St. Jude are studying how signals sent from skeletal muscle affect the brain.

Released: 26-Mar-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Cancer Drug Lessens the Toxicity of a Protein from Virus that Causes COVID-19
University of Maryland Medical Center

University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) researchers have identified the most toxic proteins made by SARS-COV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19 – and then used an FDA-approved cancer drug to blunt the viral protein’s detrimental effects.

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Released: 25-Mar-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Study reveals how long-term infection and inflammation impairs immune response as we age
Texas Children's Hospital

Humans are born with tens of thousands of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that collectively ensure lifelong production of blood and immune cells that protect us from infections.

Newswise: The a7 Protein is Ready For Its Close-Up
Released: 17-Mar-2021 12:00 PM EDT
The a7 Protein is Ready For Its Close-Up
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – March 17, 2021 – UT Southwestern researchers have identified the structure of a key member of a family of proteins called nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in three different shapes. The work, published online today in Cell, could eventually lead to new pharmaceutical treatments for a large range of diseases or infections including schizophrenia, lung cancer, and even COVID-19.

Released: 16-Mar-2021 12:15 PM EDT
New Study Shows How Mutations in SARS-CoV-2 Allow the Virus to Evade Immune System Defenses
Harvard Medical School

Research reveals how mutated SARS-CoV-2 evades immune system defenses In lab-dish experiments, the mutant virus escaped antibodies from the plasma of COVID-19 survivors as well as pharmaceutical-grade antibodies Mutations arose in an immunocompromised patient with chronic SARS-CoV-2 infection Patient-derived virus harbored structural changes now seen cropping up independently in samples across the globe Findings underscore the need for better genomic surveillance to keep track of emerging variants Results highlight importance of therapies aimed at multiple targets on SARS-CoV-2 to minimize risk of resistance

Released: 16-Mar-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Researchers Find a Better Way to Measure Consciousness
University of Wisconsin-Madison

Millions of people are administered general anesthesia each year in the United States alone, but it’s not always easy to tell whether they are actually unconscious. A small proportion of those patients regain some awareness during medical procedures, but a new study of the brain activity that represents consciousness could prevent that potential trauma.

Newswise: Exploring Amino Acids Signaling as Intervention for Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancers
11-Mar-2021 3:55 PM EST
Exploring Amino Acids Signaling as Intervention for Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancers
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey

Researchers from Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey previously identified a small protein called Rab1A that regulates amino acid signaling. In a recent study, researchers explored the physiological role of Rab1A in mammals using mice though a technique in which one of an organism's genes is made inoperative, known as genetic knockout.

Newswise: CHOP Researchers Find Ribosome Assembly Essential for Stem Cell Regeneration
10-Mar-2021 11:05 AM EST
CHOP Researchers Find Ribosome Assembly Essential for Stem Cell Regeneration
Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Researchers at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have identified genes responsible for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) regeneration via the assembly of the ribosome, the protein factories in cells that translate mRNA sequences into amino acid sequences. The findings, which were published in Cell Stem Cell, highlight the importance of proper ribosome assembly in stem cell regeneration and identify possible targets for future therapies for ribosomopathies, childhood disorders that lead to bone marrow failure (BMF).

Newswise: Putting A Protein Into Overdrive to Heal Spinal Cord Injuries
2-Mar-2021 2:30 PM EST
Putting A Protein Into Overdrive to Heal Spinal Cord Injuries
UT Southwestern Medical Center

Using genetic engineering, researchers at UT Southwestern and Indiana University have reprogrammed scar-forming cells in mouse spinal cords to create new nerve cells, spurring recovery after spinal cord injury. The findings, published online today in Cell Stem Cell, could offer hope for the hundreds of thousands of people worldwide who suffer a spinal cord injury each year.


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