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Newswise: Icy clouds could have kept early Mars warm enough for rivers and lakes, study finds
26-Apr-2021 1:35 PM EDT
Icy clouds could have kept early Mars warm enough for rivers and lakes, study finds
University of Chicago

A new study led by University of Chicago planetary scientist Edwin Kite finds Mars could have had a thin layer of icy, high-altitude clouds that caused a greenhouse effect, allowing rivers and lakes to flow.

Newswise: New research shows that Mars did not dry up all at once
Released: 12-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
New research shows that Mars did not dry up all at once
Los Alamos National Laboratory

While attention has been focused on the Perseverance rover that landed on Mars last month, its predecessor Curiosity continues to explore the base of Mount Sharp on the red planet and is still making discoveries.

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Released: 17-Mar-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Astronauts in crewed missions to Mars could misread vital emotional cues
Frontiers

Living for nearly 2 months in simulated weightlessness has a modest but widespread negative effect on cognitive performance that may not be counteracted by short periods of artificial gravity, finds a new study published in Frontiers in Physiology.

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Released: 17-Mar-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Is there life on mars today and where?
SETI Institute

In a comment published today in Nature Astronomy, Dr. Nathalie Cabrol, Director of the Carl Sagan Center for Research at the SETI Institute, challenges assumptions about the possibility of modern life on Mars held by many in the scientific community.

Released: 16-Mar-2021 4:35 PM EDT
What happened to mars's water? It is still trapped there
California Institute of Technology

Billions of years ago, the Red Planet was far more blue; according to evidence still found on the surface, abundant water flowed across Mars and forming pools, lakes, and deep oceans. The question, then, is where did all that water go?

Newswise: Image-MXene-solid-lubricant-v4.png
Released: 11-Mar-2021 4:25 PM EST
Newly discovered material may ease wear and tear on extraterrestrial vehicles
Missouri University of Science and Technology

As NASA’s Mars Perseverance Rover continues to explore the surface of Mars, scientists on Earth have developed a new nanoscale metal carbide that could act as a “superlubricant” to reduce wear and tear on future rovers.Researchers in Missouri S&T’s chemistry department and Argonne National Laboratory’s Center for Nanoscale Materials, working with a class of two-dimensional nanomaterials known as MXenes, have discovered that the materials work well to reduce friction.

Newswise: SuperCam sends first data back to Earth from the Perseverance Mars Rover
Released: 11-Mar-2021 11:15 AM EST
SuperCam sends first data back to Earth from the Perseverance Mars Rover
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Following the successful landing of NASA's Perseverance rover in Jezero Crater on Mars, the SuperCam operational teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the French National Centre for Space Studies (CNES) received the first results showing that SuperCam is in good health and giving its first impressions of the crater.

Newswise: Porous, ultralow-temperature supercapacitors could power Mars, polar missions
5-Mar-2021 10:40 AM EST
Porous, ultralow-temperature supercapacitors could power Mars, polar missions
American Chemical Society (ACS)

Researchers reporting in ACS’ Nano Letters have 3D printed porous carbon aerogels for electrodes in ultralow-temperature supercapacitors, reducing heating needs for future space and polar missions.

Newswise: MEDIA ADVISORY: News conference
Released: 9-Mar-2021 12:20 PM EST
MEDIA ADVISORY: News conference
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Los Alamos National Laboratory and France’s National Centre for Space Studies (CNES) will hold an online press conference on Wednesday, March 10, to assess the health of SuperCam, the rock-zapping laser that was developed under the auspices of the two institutions and is now on board the NASA Perseverance rover on the surface of Mars.

Newswise: Mars’ Early Climate Was Intermittently Warm
5-Mar-2021 9:55 AM EST
Mars’ Early Climate Was Intermittently Warm
Stony Brook University

A new study that characterizes the climate of Mars over the planet’s lifetime reveals that in its earliest history it was periodically warmed, yet remained relatively cold in the intervening periods, thus providing opportunities and challenges for any microbial life form that may have been emerging.

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Released: 22-Feb-2021 4:10 PM EST
Life from Earth could temporarily survive on Mars
Frontiers

Some microbes on Earth could temporarily survive on the surface of Mars, finds a new study by NASA and German Aerospace Center scientists.

Newswise: Seeking History of Life on Mars:   2020 Perseverance Rover Experts Available
Released: 22-Feb-2021 2:10 PM EST
Seeking History of Life on Mars: 2020 Perseverance Rover Experts Available
Stony Brook University

The new era of space exploration features two Stony Brook University faculty members as part of the development of NASA’s Mars2020 Perseverance rover that recently landed. Distinguished Professor Scott McLennan and Associate Professor Joel Hurowitz worked on the PIXL (Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry) that is attached to the arm of the rover. Professor Hurowitz also serves as the deputy principal investigator for the PIXL and is part of the scientific leadership of the mission.

Newswise: What will ancient sedimentary rock tell us about the history of life on Mars?
Released: 22-Feb-2021 12:55 PM EST
What will ancient sedimentary rock tell us about the history of life on Mars?
Stony Brook University

The new era of space exploration features two Stony Brook University faculty members as part of the development of NASA’s Mars2020 Perseverance rover that recently landed. Distinguished Professor Scott McLennan and Associate Professor Joel Hurowitz both worked on the PIXL (Planetary Instrument for X-ray Lithochemistry) that is attached to the arm of the rover. The PIXL is a micro-focus X-ray fluorescence instrument that rapidly measures elemental chemistry by focusing an X-ray beam to a tiny spot on the target rock or soil, analyzing the induced X-ray fluorescence. Both professors have been working on Mars missions with NASA since 2004.

Newswise: Life of a pure Martian design
Released: 19-Feb-2021 5:05 AM EST
Life of a pure Martian design
University of Vienna

Experimental microbially assisted chemolithotrophy provides an opportunity to trace the putative bioalteration processes of the Martian crust. A study on the Noachian Martian breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 composed of ancient (ca. 4.5 Gyr old) crustal materials from Mars, led by ERC grantee Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna, now delivered a unique prototype of microbial life experimentally designed on a real Martian material. As the researchers show in the current issue of "Nature Communications Earth and Environment", this life of a pure Martian design is a rich source of Martian-relevant biosignatures.

Newswise:Video Embedded pills-face-harshest-space-test-yet
VIDEO
Released: 19-Feb-2021 1:05 AM EST
Pills face harshest space test yet
University of Adelaide

A batch of pills will be on its way into space where they will be placed on the outside of the International Space Station (ISS) to test how they withstand the full effects of zero gravity, extreme temperatures and some of the highest levels of radiation found beyond the Earth’s atmosphere.

Newswise: Perseverance rover takes New Mexico to Mars
Released: 16-Feb-2021 6:40 PM EST
Perseverance rover takes New Mexico to Mars
Los Alamos National Laboratory

When NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover touches down on the surface of Mars on Feb. 18, a bit of New Mexico will land along with it, thanks to work done at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

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Released: 3-Feb-2021 12:25 PM EST
An innovative and non-destructive strategy to analyse material from Mars
University of the Basque Country

The IBeA research group from the University of the Basque Country's Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, is participating in NASA's Mars2020 space mission, which is scheduled to touch down on Mars in February this year.

Released: 14-Dec-2020 8:05 PM EST
Powerful electrical events quickly alter surface chemistry on Mars and other planetary bodies
Washington University in St. Louis

Thinking like Earthlings may have caused scientists to overlook the electrochemical effects of Martian dust storms. On Earth, dust particles are viewed mainly in terms of their physical effects, like erosion. But, in exotic locales from Mars to Venus to Jupiter's icy moon Europa, electrical effects can affect the chemical composition of a planetary body's surface and atmosphere in a relatively short time, according to research from Washington University in St. Louis.

Newswise: Best Region For Life on Mars Was Far Below Surface
Released: 2-Dec-2020 2:00 PM EST
Best Region For Life on Mars Was Far Below Surface
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The most habitable region for life on Mars would have been up to several miles below its surface, likely due to subsurface melting of thick ice sheets fueled by geothermal heat, a Rutgers-led study concludes. The study, published in the journal Science Advances, may help resolve what’s known as the faint young sun paradox – a lingering key question in Mars science.

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Released: 30-Nov-2020 3:30 PM EST
New Tech Can Get Oxygen, Fuel From Mars’ Salty Water
Washington University in St. Louis

A new electrolysis system that makes use of briny water could provide astronauts on Mars with life-supporting oxygen and fuel for the ride home, according to engineers at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis, who developed the system.

Released: 20-Nov-2020 11:35 AM EST
Field Geology at Mars’ Equator Points to Ancient Megaflood
Cornell University

Floods of unimaginable magnitude once washed through Gale Crater on Mars’ equator around 4 billion years ago – a finding that hints at the possibility that life may have existed there, according to data collected by NASA’s Curiosity rover and analyzed in joint project by scientists from Jackson State University, Cornell University, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the University of Hawaii.

Released: 13-Nov-2020 12:10 PM EST
Escape from Mars: how water fled the red planet
University of Arizona

Mars once had oceans but is now bone-dry, leaving many to wonder how the water was lost.

Released: 5-Nov-2020 3:45 PM EST
Clay subsoil at Earth’s driest place may signal life on Mars
Cornell University

Diverse microbes discovered in the clay-rich, shallow soil layers in Chile’s dry Atacama Desert suggest that similar deposits below the Martian surface may contain microorganisms, which could be easily found by future rover missions or landing craft.

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Released: 3-Nov-2020 11:25 AM EST
New remote sensing technique could bring key planetary mineral into focus
Brown University

Planetary scientists from Brown University have developed a new remote sensing method for studying olivine, a mineral that could help scientists understand the early evolution of the Moon, Mars and other planetary bodies.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-los-alamos-national-laboratory-spin-off-aims-to-put-nuclear-reactors-in-space
VIDEO
Released: 2-Nov-2020 11:55 AM EST
New Los Alamos National Laboratory spin-off aims to put nuclear reactors in space
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A new agreement hopes to speed along a nuclear reactor technology that could be used to fuel deep-space exploration and possibly power human habitats on the Moon or Mars. Los Alamos National Laboratory has signed an agreement to license the “Kilopower” space reactor technology to Space Nuclear Power Corporation (SpaceNukes), also based in Los Alamos, NM.

Newswise: Geologists simulate soil conditions to help grow plants on Mars
Released: 27-Oct-2020 10:10 AM EDT
Geologists simulate soil conditions to help grow plants on Mars
University of Georgia

Humankind’s next giant step may be onto Mars. But before those missions can begin, scientists need to make scores of breakthrough advances, including learning how to grow crops on the red planet.

Newswise: What it takes to shoot a laser on Mars
Released: 16-Sep-2020 1:50 PM EDT
What it takes to shoot a laser on Mars
Los Alamos National Laboratory

For the better part of a decade, an extraordinary tool aboard NASA’s Curiosity rover has been investigating the chemical building blocks of life and making exciting discoveries about Mars’ habitability.

Released: 15-Sep-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Study shows difficulty in finding evidence of life on Mars
Cornell University

While scientists are eager to study the red planet’s soils for signs of life, researchers must ponder a considerable new challenge: Acidic fluids – which once flowed on the Martian surface – may have destroyed biological evidence hidden within Mars’ iron-rich clays, according to researchers at Cornell University and at Spain’s Centro de Astrobiología.

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Released: 31-Aug-2020 11:10 AM EDT
CU scientists create batteries that could make it easier to explore Mars
Clemson University

Electrifying research by Clemson University scientists could lead to the creation of lighter, faster-charging batteries suitable for powering a spacesuit, or even a Mars rover.

Newswise: Life after landing on Mars
Released: 27-Aug-2020 5:15 PM EDT
Life after landing on Mars
Los Alamos National Laboratory

When NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars in February after its seven-month-long journey, the mission will only just be beginning.

Newswise: Searching Mars for signatures of life
Released: 20-Aug-2020 8:05 PM EDT
Searching Mars for signatures of life
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Today, Mars is an arid, dusty, and frigid landscape with an average temperature of minus 80 degrees Fahrenheit—inhospitable to life as we know it. But it wasn’t always that way.

Newswise:Video Embedded podcast-explains-how-plutonium-powers-mars-exploration
VIDEO
Released: 13-Aug-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Podcast explains how plutonium powers Mars exploration
Los Alamos National Laboratory

To have dependable power to explore the the frigid surface of Mars, NASA’s Perseverance rover is equipped with a type of power system called a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG)—which is what the latest episode of Mars Technica will tell listeners all about.

Newswise: Take a guided ‘tour’ of SuperCam on the new Mars rover
Released: 6-Aug-2020 2:15 PM EDT
Take a guided ‘tour’ of SuperCam on the new Mars rover
Los Alamos National Laboratory

NASA’s new Perseverance rover, which just started its seven-month journey to Mars, carries on board what is likely the most versatile instrument ever created to understand the planet’s past habitability: SuperCam—and a new podcast will tell listeners all about it.

Newswise:Video Embedded was-there-life-on-mars-new-podcast-explores-instruments-aboard-mars-rover
VIDEO
Released: 29-Jul-2020 6:50 PM EDT
Was there life on Mars? New podcast explores instruments aboard Mars rover
Los Alamos National Laboratory

Could Jezero Crater hold the keys to unlocking an ancient and hidden past when life might have existed on the Martian surface?

Newswise:Video Embedded ornl-produced-plutonium-238-to-help-power-perseverance-on-mars
VIDEO
Released: 29-Jul-2020 9:00 AM EDT
ORNL-produced plutonium-238 to help power Perseverance on Mars
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Mars 2020 will be the first NASA mission that uses ORNL-produced plutonium-238, the first U.S.-produced Pu-238 in three decades. ORNL's Pu-238 will help power Perseverance across the Red Planet's surface.

Newswise: MunirHumayun.jpg
Released: 27-Jul-2020 2:40 PM EDT
FSU expert available for context on NASA Perseverance mission
Florida State University

By: Bill Wellock | Published: July 27, 2020 | 2:27 pm | SHARE: This summer, NASA’s Perseverance rover mission will begin its exploration of Mars, gathering valuable data that will help scientists understand our neighboring planet.Once on Mars, the rover will search for signs of ancient microscopic life and collect data about the planet’s geology and climate.

Newswise: New Mars rover tool will zap rocks to investigate planet’s past habitability
Released: 27-Jul-2020 1:05 PM EDT
New Mars rover tool will zap rocks to investigate planet’s past habitability
Los Alamos National Laboratory

When NASA’s Perseverance rover launches from Florida on its way to Mars, it will carry aboard what is likely the most versatile instrument ever made to better understand the Red Planet’s past habitability.

Newswise: Tracking space enterprises will change accounting, UAH professor says
Released: 27-Jul-2020 10:20 AM EDT
Tracking space enterprises will change accounting, UAH professor says
University of Alabama Huntsville

Emerging space businesses will drive new innovations in the accounting needed to provide an accurate picture of operations, says an associate professor of accounting at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) who has written a paper examining commerce in space.

Newswise: Mission to Mars: @UNLV Scientist Gives Insider Glimpse at NASA's 2020 Rover Mission
Released: 6-Jul-2020 11:55 AM EDT
Mission to Mars: @UNLV Scientist Gives Insider Glimpse at NASA's 2020 Rover Mission
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

Silver, bug-eyed extraterrestrials zooming across the cosmos in bullet-speed spaceships. Green, oval-faced creatures hiding out in a secret fortress at Nevada’s Area 51 base. Cartoonish, throaty-voiced relatives of Marvin the Martian who don armor and Spartan-style helmets. We humans are fascinated with the possibility of life on the Red Planet.

Newswise: The Magnetic History of Ice
Released: 30-Jun-2020 3:45 PM EDT
The Magnetic History of Ice
Weizmann Institute of Science

The Weizmann Institute's Prof. Oded Aharonson found that ancient ice holds magnetic particles. The finding could shed greater light on the Earth’s magnetic field reversals, supplement magnetic field data from rocks and sediment, and identify field reversals on other bodies in our Solar System, such as Mars.

Released: 15-Jun-2020 10:40 AM EDT
Electrically charged dust storms drive Martian chlorine cycle
Washington University in St. Louis

This paper — from the group that previously examined Martian dust storms — shifts focus to the electrochemical processes resulting from dust storms that may power the movement of chlorine, which is ongoing on Mars today. The research was published May 28 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.

Newswise: 231516_web.jpg
Released: 11-May-2020 4:05 PM EDT
SwRI scientist modeled Mars climate to understand habitability
Southwest Research Institute

A Southwest Research Institute scientist modeled the atmosphere of Mars to help determine that salty pockets of water present on the Red Planet are likely not habitable by life as we know it on Earth.

Newswise: ASGC cube satellite would exploreusing lunar soil as human radiation shield
6-May-2020 3:45 PM EDT
ASGC cube satellite would exploreusing lunar soil as human radiation shield
University of Alabama Huntsville

Science aboard an Alabama Space Grant Consortium (ASGC) student-led cube satellite mission called AEGIS could be valuable to developing future human outposts on the moon and in space travel to Mars if NASA gives the go-ahead for a 2022 flight.


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