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Newswise: Cedars-Sinai Investigators ID Gene Critical to Human Immune Response
Released: 27-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Cedars-Sinai Investigators ID Gene Critical to Human Immune Response
Cedars-Sinai

Cedars-Sinai investigators have identified a gene that plays an essential role in the innate human immune system. The gene, NLRP11, helps activate the inflammatory response that tells the body’s white blood cells to go on the attack against a foreign presence.

Released: 26-May-2022 4:55 PM EDT
Study explores water content in deep earth volcanic magma
University of Wyoming

Magmatic volatile contents, such as water, are abundant in volcanic arc melts and influence magma evolution, dynamics of volcanic eruptions and the formation of ore deposits.

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Embargo will expire: 31-May-2022 5:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 26-May-2022 1:20 PM EDT

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Newswise: May Research Highlights: A Roundup of the Latest Medical Discoveries and Faculty News at Cedars-Sinai
Released: 26-May-2022 1:20 PM EDT
May Research Highlights: A Roundup of the Latest Medical Discoveries and Faculty News at Cedars-Sinai
Cedars-Sinai

A Roundup of the Latest Medical Discoveries and Faculty News at Cedars-Sinai

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 30-May-2022 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 26-May-2022 1:10 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-May-2022 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: Arc Volcanoes Are Wetter than Previously Thought, With Scientific and Economic Implications
Released: 26-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Arc Volcanoes Are Wetter than Previously Thought, With Scientific and Economic Implications
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

This increased amount of water has broad implications for understanding how Earth’s lower crust forms, how magma erupts through the crust, and how economically important mineral ore deposits form, according to a new paper led by authors from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), “High water content of arc magmas recorded in cumulates from subduction zone lower crust,” published in Nature Geoscience.

26-May-2022 7:05 AM EDT
Comorbidities Can Increase Plasma Biomarker Levels Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease
Wake Forest School of Medicine

New research shows that comorbidities such as chronic kidney disease are associated with higher plasma p-tau levels.

Newswise: Hot-blooded T. rex and cold-blooded Stegosaurus: chemical clues reveal dinosaur metabolisms
Released: 25-May-2022 5:50 PM EDT
Hot-blooded T. rex and cold-blooded Stegosaurus: chemical clues reveal dinosaur metabolisms
Field Museum

For decades, paleontologists have debated whether dinosaurs were warm-blooded, like modern mammals and birds, or cold-blooded, like modern reptiles.

Released: 25-May-2022 5:05 PM EDT
Newly discovered ancient Amazonian cities reveal how urban landscapes were built without harming nature
University of Exeter

A newly discovered network of “lost” ancient cities in the Amazon could provide a pivotal new insight into how ancient civilisations combined the construction of vast urban landscapes while living alongside nature.

Released: 25-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Artificial Cilia Could Someday Power Diagnostic Devices
Cornell University

Cilia are the body’s diligent ushers. These microscopic hairs, which move fluid by rhythmic beating, are responsible for pushing cerebrospinal fluid in your brain, clearing the phlegm and dirt from your lungs, and keeping other organs and tissues clean.

24-May-2022 2:05 PM EDT
Neuroscientists Identify How the Brain Links Related Memories
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA scientists have discovered how the brain links memories and a way to restore this function in aging mice--as well as an FDA-approved drug that achieves the same thing. The Nature findings suggest a new method for combatting middle-aged memory loss.

23-May-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Long COVID Poses Risks to Vaccinated People, Too
Washington University in St. Louis

Vaccinated people with mild breakthrough COVID-19 infections can experience debilitating, lingering symptoms that affect the heart, brain, lungs and other parts of the body, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health Care System. However, a new study of more than 13 million veterans also found that vaccination against the virus that causes COVID-19 reduced the risk of death by 34% and the risk of getting long COVID-19 by 15%, compared with unvaccinated patients infected with the virus.

23-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Genetic roots of 3 mitochondrial diseases ID’d via new approach
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of Wisconsin–Madison identified the genetic causes of three mitochondrial diseases by figuring out what dozens of poorly understood mitochondrial proteins do.

Released: 24-May-2022 12:00 PM EDT
Secret to treating ‘Achilles’ heel’ of alternatives to silicon solar panels revealed
University of Cambridge

A team of researchers from the UK and Japan has found that the tiny defects which limit the efficiency of perovskites – cheaper alternative materials for solar cells – are also responsible for structural changes in the material that lead to degradation.

Newswise: Scientists Discover Gene Plays Critical Role in Embryo Development
Released: 24-May-2022 11:55 AM EDT
Scientists Discover Gene Plays Critical Role in Embryo Development
Cedars-Sinai

A new study co-led by a Cedars-Sinai investigator identified a gene that plays an important role in a biological pathway involved in embryo development. The gene's impact at the cellular level could explain why some babies are born with physical abnormalities and why some adults develop diseases such as cancer. The findings are published in Nature Communications.

Newswise: Planets of Binary Stars as Possible Homes for Alien Life
Released: 23-May-2022 4:30 PM EDT
Planets of Binary Stars as Possible Homes for Alien Life
University of Copenhagen

Nearly half of Sun-size stars are binary. According to University of Copenhagen research, planetary systems around binary stars may be very different from those around single stars. This points to new targets in the search for extraterrestrial life forms.

Newswise: Gene-edited tomatoes could be a new source of vitamin D
Released: 23-May-2022 4:10 PM EDT
Gene-edited tomatoes could be a new source of vitamin D
John Innes Centre

Tomatoes gene-edited to produce vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, could be a simple and sustainable innovation to address a global health problem.

Newswise: Scientists Find Sea Corals are Source of Sought After
18-May-2022 4:05 PM EDT
Scientists Find Sea Corals are Source of Sought After "Anti-Cancer" Compound
University of Utah Health

The bottom of the ocean is full of mysteries but scientists have recently uncovered one of its best-kept secrets. For 25 years, drug hunters have been searching for the source of a natural chemical that had shown promise in initial studies for treating cancer. Now, researchers at University of Utah Health report that easy-to-find soft corals make the elusive compound.

Released: 23-May-2022 10:05 AM EDT
Scientists Uncover an Exotic Magnetic Phase of Matter
Argonne National Laboratory

At the quantum mechanics level, the mystery of what happens when electrons transition between metallic and insulator states has intrigued physicists for nearly 60 years. Modern instrumentation has provided a fascinating glimpse at the answer.

Newswise: Haywire T Cells Attack Protein In
Released: 20-May-2022 1:55 PM EDT
Haywire T Cells Attack Protein In "Bad" Cholesterol
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

Detecting these T cells may lead to diagnostics to better detect heart disease—and disease severity.

Newswise: Snake trade in Indonesia is not sustainable enough -- but it could be
Released: 20-May-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Snake trade in Indonesia is not sustainable enough -- but it could be
Pensoft Publishers

Wildlife trade is a multi-million dollar industry. While some animals are traded legally, in compliance with legislation that aims to protect populations, wildlife trafficking continues to thrive in many places, threatening precious species with extinction.

Newswise: 'Traffic calming' boosts breeding on coral reefs
Released: 20-May-2022 12:40 PM EDT
'Traffic calming' boosts breeding on coral reefs
University of Exeter

Coral reef fish breed more successfully if motorboat noise is reduced, new research shows.

Released: 20-May-2022 10:25 AM EDT
Uncovering new details of the brain's first line of defense
Kyushu University

Thanks to over a century of modern neuroscience, we have made significant strides in our understanding of the brain.

Released: 19-May-2022 4:30 PM EDT
How fast-growing algae could enhance growth of food crops
Princeton University

A new study provides a framework to boost crop growth by incorporating a strategy adopted from a fast-growing species of green algae.

Released: 19-May-2022 4:25 PM EDT
How a cognitive bias is blocking the rise of electric cars
Université de Genève (University of Geneva)

What are the barriers to the adoption of electric cars? Although the main financial and technological obstacles have been removed, their market share still needs to increase.

Released: 19-May-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Policy, Farm Management Help China Mitigate Climate Change
Cornell University

Production of animal protein in China has increased by 800% over the past 40 years, driven by population growth, urbanization and higher worker wages. However, the amount of climate-warming nitrous oxide released from animal farming in the country has not risen as quickly, thanks to science-led policy and farm management interventions in the way animals are fed and their manure recycled.

Released: 19-May-2022 2:45 PM EDT
Without ‘work-life balance,’ this protein may promote disease
Ohio State University

A family of proteins that have a role in ensuring many types of cells move and maintain their shape may promote disease when they act like workaholics and disrupt the cellular environment, new research suggests.

Released: 19-May-2022 1:55 PM EDT
Epilepsy Drug Stops Nervous System Tumor Growth in Mice
Washington University in St. Louis

People with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) develop tumors on nerves throughout their bodies. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered that nerve cells with the mutation that causes NF1 are hyperexcitable and that suppressing this hyperactivity with the epilepsy drug lamotrigine stops tumor growth in mice.

Newswise: Satellite monitoring of biodiversity moves within reach
Released: 19-May-2022 11:45 AM EDT
Satellite monitoring of biodiversity moves within reach
University of Zurich

Internationally comparable data on biodiversity is needed to protect threatened ecosystems, restore destroyed habitats and counteract the negative effects of global biodiversity loss.

Newswise: Oxygen Formation in the Light of Gamma Beams
Released: 19-May-2022 9:35 AM EDT
Oxygen Formation in the Light of Gamma Beams
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Nuclear fusion reactions in stars consume carbon-12 to produce oxygen-16, and the resulting ratio of carbon to oxygen shapes a star’s evolution. Physicists have not been able to measure this ratio with precision using existing experimental methods. A new method shines gamma beams on an oxygen-16 target and captures images of the outgoing reaction products to obtain higher-quality data on this reaction.

Newswise: Tooth unlocks mystery of Denisovans in Asia
Released: 18-May-2022 6:10 PM EDT
Tooth unlocks mystery of Denisovans in Asia
Flinders University

What links a finger bone and some fossil teeth found in a cave in the remote Altai Mountains of Siberia to a single tooth found in a cave in the limestone landscapes of tropical Laos?

Released: 18-May-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Always adapting: Scientists use Argonne’s Advanced Photon Source to fight SARS-CoV-2 variants
Argonne National Laboratory

Knowing variants of concern can spike rates of illness and death around the globe, scientists using the APS are concentrating efforts on mutations of the virus that causes COVID-19.

Newswise: Surveillance Pathway Tells Cells When They Run Low on Lipids
Released: 18-May-2022 1:05 PM EDT
Surveillance Pathway Tells Cells When They Run Low on Lipids
UT Southwestern Medical Center

UT Southwestern researchers have discovered a molecular pathway that allows cells to sense when their lipid supplies become depleted, prompting a flurry of activity that prevents starvation. The findings, reported in Nature, might someday lead to new ways to combat metabolic disorders and a variety of other health conditions.

Released: 18-May-2022 11:55 AM EDT
Researchers Use Galaxy as a ‘Cosmic Telescope’ to Study Heart of the Young Universe
North Carolina State University

A unique new instrument, coupled with a powerful telescope and a little help from nature, has given researchers the ability to peer into galactic nurseries at the heart of the young universe.

Newswise: Penn Medicine Study Reveals Imaging Approach with Potential to Detect Lung Cancer Earlier, at the Cellular Level
Released: 18-May-2022 9:55 AM EDT
Penn Medicine Study Reveals Imaging Approach with Potential to Detect Lung Cancer Earlier, at the Cellular Level
Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to identify lung cancer at the cellular level in real time during a biopsy, offering promise in the ability to detect the disease earlier and with more confidence. The research is published this week in Nature Communications.

Released: 18-May-2022 3:05 AM EDT
A Component for Brain-Inspired Computing
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

Researchers from ETH Zurich, Empa and the University of Zurich have developed a new material for an electronic component that can be used in a wider range of applications than its predecessors. Such components will help create electronic circuits that emulate the human brain and that are more efficient than conventional computers at performing machine-learning tasks.

Newswise: New light on organic solar cells
Released: 17-May-2022 12:35 PM EDT
New light on organic solar cells
Linkoping University

Efficient and environmentally friendly solar cells are required for a transition to a fossil-free energy supply.

Newswise: Magnetic Resonance Makes the Invisible Visible
Released: 17-May-2022 6:05 AM EDT
Magnetic Resonance Makes the Invisible Visible
University of Vienna

A small group of researchers including Dennis Kurzbach from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna just published in "Nature Protocols” an advanced NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) method to monitor fast and complicated biomolecular events such as protein folding.

Released: 17-May-2022 6:05 AM EDT
Early Earth: Tungsten isotopes in seawater provide insights into the co-evolution of Earth's mantle and continents
University of Vienna

In a study published in the journal Nature Communications, Andrea Mundl-Petermeier and Sebastian Viehmann of the Department of Lithospheric Research at the University of Vienna have demonstrated that a new geochemical archive - 182Tungsten in banded iron formations - can be used to simultaneously trace both the evolution of the Earth's mantle and continents throughout Earth’s history. This offers new opportunities to better understand the Precambrian Earth in the future.

Newswise: Can Spurring Neuron Growth in Adulthood Improve Cognitive Health, Mood?
Released: 16-May-2022 2:55 PM EDT
Can Spurring Neuron Growth in Adulthood Improve Cognitive Health, Mood?
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

UNC-Chapel Hill scientists boosted electrical activity between cells in the hypothalamus and the hippocampus to create new neurons – an important process called neurogenesis -- in animal models.

Released: 16-May-2022 1:45 PM EDT
New Paper Explores Ethical Challenges in Microbiome Research
University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV)

A human rights activist and a group of anthropologists and human biologists are casting a critical lens on the way that microbiome research is conducted with Indigenous peoples. While not the first time a call for more ethical research engagement in the biological sciences has been sounded, this approach, published in the May 16 issue of Nature Microbiology, is the first to engage the microbiome sciences from an interdisciplinary perspective.

Newswise: COVID-19, MIS-C and Kawasaki Disease Share Same Immune Response
12-May-2022 2:15 PM EDT
COVID-19, MIS-C and Kawasaki Disease Share Same Immune Response
University of California San Diego Health

COVID-19, MIS-C and KD all share a similar underlying mechanism involving the over-activation of particular inflammatory pathways, UC San Diego study shows. Findings support novel drug targets for MIS-C.

Newswise: Sea ice can control Antarctic ice sheet stability, new research finds
Released: 13-May-2022 11:15 AM EDT
Sea ice can control Antarctic ice sheet stability, new research finds
University of Cambridge

Despite the rapid melting of ice in many parts of Antarctica during the second half of the 20th century, researchers have found that the floating ice shelves which skirt the eastern Antarctic Peninsula have undergone sustained advance over the past 20 years.

Released: 13-May-2022 5:45 AM EDT
Spatial epitranscriptomics reveals A-to-I editome specific to cancer stem cell microniches
Nature Communications

… With Select-seq, we analyse the cancer stem cell-like microniches in relation to the tumour microenvironment of triple-negative breast cancer patients. We identify alternative splice variants, perform complementarity-determining region analysis of …

Released: 12-May-2022 3:05 PM EDT
Extreme storms could help protect beaches from sea level rise, new study finds
University of New South Wales

Images in the wake of violent coastal storms usually focus purely on the extensive damage caused to beaches, dunes, property, and surrounding infrastructure.

Newswise: floquet.png
Released: 12-May-2022 12:05 PM EDT
New Tech Can Double Spectral Bandwidth in Some 5G Systems
Washington University in St. Louis

Using the properties of a unique class of materials, researchers, including Aravind Nagulu at the McKelvey School of Engineering, may have found a way to dramatically increase the bandwidth available for wireless communications.

Newswise:Video Embedded from-cavefish-to-humans-evolution-of-metabolism-in-cavefish-may-provide-insight-into-treatments-for-a-host-of-diseases-such-as-diabetes-heart-disease-and-stroke
VIDEO
11-May-2022 9:55 AM EDT
From Cavefish to Humans: Evolution of Metabolism in Cavefish May Provide Insight Into Treatments for a Host of Diseases Such as Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke
Stowers Institute for Medical Research

New research examines how cavefish developed unique metabolic adaptations to survive in nutrient-scarce environments. The study created a genome-wide map of liver tissue for two independent colonies of cavefish along with river fish to understand how cavefish metabolism evolved and how this may be applicable for humans.

Newswise: New Research Could Provide Earlier Warning of Tsunamis
Released: 11-May-2022 6:20 PM EDT
New Research Could Provide Earlier Warning of Tsunamis
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A new method of detecting mega earthquakes, which picks up on the gravity waves they generate by using deep-learning models created at Los Alamos National Laboratory, can estimate earthquake magnitude in real time and provide earlier warning of tsunamis.

Newswise: Artificial Intelligence Agents Argue to Enhance the Speed of Materials Discovery
Released: 11-May-2022 4:50 PM EDT
Artificial Intelligence Agents Argue to Enhance the Speed of Materials Discovery
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Researchers have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI)-powered approach to analyzing X-ray diffraction (XRD) data. The X-ray Crystallography companion Agent (XCA) approach assembles a group of AIs that debate each other while analyzing live streaming X-ray data. Once the AIs cast their final votes, the XCA approach uses the vote tally to interpret what the most likely atomic structure is and to suggest how confident the researchers should be of the AI analysis. The AI analysis matches human effectiveness but takes just seconds.

Newswise: Ludwig MSK Study Modeling Tumor Evolution Reveals a Vulnerability for Cancer Prevention and Therapy
Released: 11-May-2022 11:05 AM EDT
Ludwig MSK Study Modeling Tumor Evolution Reveals a Vulnerability for Cancer Prevention and Therapy
Ludwig Cancer Research

Though the mutations accumulated by cancer cells occur more or less randomly, certain regions of genes essential to cancer growth appear to be more frequently mutated than others in established tumors.


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