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21-May-2024 6:05 AM EDT
Research reveals more people died from hot or cold weather conditions than COVID-19 in parts of UK
University of Bristol

Research has highlighted how weather extremes worsened by climate change are now a major national public health threat.

Newswise: Precision Measurements of Radioactive Molecules for Fundamental Physics
Released: 22-May-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Precision Measurements of Radioactive Molecules for Fundamental Physics
Department of Energy, Office of Science

For the first time, nuclear physicists made precision measurements of the short-lived radioactive molecule, radium monofluoride (RaF). The researchers combined ion-trapping and specialized laser systems to measure the fine details of the quantum structure of RaF. This allowed them to study the rotational energy levels of RaF and determine its laser-cooling scheme.

Newswise:Video Embedded wearable-ultrasound-patch-enables-continuous-non-invasive-monitoring-of-cerebral-blood-flow
VIDEO
Released: 22-May-2024 2:05 PM EDT
Wearable ultrasound patch enables continuous, non-invasive monitoring of cerebral blood flow
University of California San Diego

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a wearable ultrasound patch that can offer continuous, non-invasive monitoring of blood flow in the brain. The soft and stretchy patch can be comfortably worn on the temple to provide three-dimensional data on cerebral blood flow—a first in wearable technology.

   
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Released: 22-May-2024 2:05 PM EDT
Food for Thought: Study Links Key Nutrients to Slower Brain Aging
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Scientists have long been studying the brain with a goal of aiding healthier aging. While much is known about risk factors for accelerated brain aging, less has been uncovered to identify ways to reduce cognitive decline.

   
Newswise: Tumor mutations may not predict response to immunotherapy
Released: 22-May-2024 12:05 PM EDT
Tumor mutations may not predict response to immunotherapy
UT Southwestern Medical Center

The number of mutations in the DNA of cancerous tumors may not be an indicator of how well patients will respond to immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs), a commonly prescribed type of immunotherapy, a team led by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers reported in a retrospective study. The findings, published in Nature Cancer, upend long-held conventional wisdom and could lead to more effective ways of deciding which patients will benefit most from this type of treatment.

Newswise: Promethium bound: Rare earth element’s secrets exposed
21-May-2024 11:00 AM EDT
Promethium bound: Rare earth element’s secrets exposed
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Scientists have uncovered the properties of a rare earth element that was first discovered 80 years ago at the very same laboratory, opening a new pathway for the exploration of elements critical in modern technology, from medicine to space travel.

Released: 21-May-2024 10:00 PM EDT
MD Anderson Research Highlights for May 21, 2024
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Research Highlights showcases the latest breakthroughs in cancer care, research and prevention. These advances are made possible through seamless collaboration between MD Anderson’s world-leading clinicians and scientists, bringing discoveries from the lab to the clinic and back.

   
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Released: 21-May-2024 2:05 PM EDT
New Crystal Production Method Could Enhance Quantum Computers and Electronics
University of California, Irvine

In a study published in Nature Materials, scientists from the University of California, Irvine describe a new method to make very thin crystals of the element bismuth – a process that may aid the manufacturing of cheap flexible electronics an everyday reality.

Newswise: A New Gene-Editing System Tackles Complex Diseases
Released: 21-May-2024 11:00 AM EDT
A New Gene-Editing System Tackles Complex Diseases
University of California San Diego

Current methods to model or correct mutations in live cells are inefficient, especially when multiplexing — installing multiple point mutations simultaneously across the genome. Researchers from the UC San Diego have developed new, efficient genome editing tools called multiplexed orthogonal base editors (MOBEs) to install multiple point mutations at once.

Newswise: Batteries: Modeling Tomorrow’s Materials Today
Released: 21-May-2024 4:05 AM EDT
Batteries: Modeling Tomorrow’s Materials Today
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT)

Which factors determine how quickly a battery can be charged? This and other questions are studied by researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) with the help of computer-based simulations.

Newswise:Video Embedded scientists-aim-to-stop-harmful-gut-bacteria-triggering-alzheimer-s
VIDEO
Released: 20-May-2024 8:05 PM EDT
Scientists aim to stop harmful gut bacteria triggering Alzheimer’s
University of South Australia

Australian scientists are exploring how harmful gut bacteria from a poor diet can access the brain and trigger early onset Alzheimer's disease.

Newswise: Nano Drug Accelerates Diabetic Wound Healing in Mice
16-May-2024 3:05 PM EDT
Nano Drug Accelerates Diabetic Wound Healing in Mice
Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have designed a regenerative medicine therapy to speed up diabetic wound repair. Using tiny fat particles loaded with genetic instructions to calm down inflammation, the treatment was shown to target problem-causing cells and reduce swelling and harmful molecules in mouse models of damaged skin. Details on their findings were published in the May 20 online issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS).

Newswise: Repeat COVID-19 vaccinations elicit antibodies that neutralize variants, other viruses
Released: 17-May-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Repeat COVID-19 vaccinations elicit antibodies that neutralize variants, other viruses
Washington University in St. Louis

A study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that repeat vaccination with updated versions of the COVID-19 vaccine promotes the development of antibodies that neutralize a wide range of variants of the virus that causes COVID-19, as well as related coronaviruses.

Newswise: Vivek%20Kumar%20with%20hydrogels-resize.jpg?itok=Ls_qh5Tc
Released: 17-May-2024 1:05 PM EDT
NJIT Engineers Muffle Invading Pathogens with a 'Molecular Mask'
New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT)

Vaccines remain the gold standard of protection against dangerous pathogens, but take considerable time and vast resources to develop. Rapidly mutating viruses such as SARS-CoV-2 can blunt their effectiveness and even render them obsolete.

   
Newswise: The crystallization of memory: Study reveals how practice forms new memory pathways in the brain
Released: 15-May-2024 2:05 PM EDT
The crystallization of memory: Study reveals how practice forms new memory pathways in the brain
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A new study led by UCLA Health has shown that repetitive practice not only is helpful in improving skills but also leads to profound changes in the brain’s memory pathways.

Newswise:Video Embedded heating-proteins-to-body-temperature-reveals-new-drug-targets
VIDEO
Released: 15-May-2024 12:05 PM EDT
Heating proteins to body temperature reveals new drug targets
Van Andel Institute

Some proteins shift their shape when exposed to different temperatures, revealing previously unknown binding sites for medications.

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Released: 15-May-2024 11:05 AM EDT
What Fire Ants Can Teach US About Making Better, Self-Healing Materials
Binghamton University, State University of New York

Fire ants form rafts to survive flooding, but how do those bonds work? And what can we learn from them? A Binghamton University, State University of New York professor is researching those questions to expand our knowledge of materials science.

   
Newswise: Equity Must Be Considered In Ocean Governance To Achieve Global Targets By 2030
Released: 14-May-2024 5:05 PM EDT
Equity Must Be Considered In Ocean Governance To Achieve Global Targets By 2030
Wildlife Conservation Society

As the world presses forward with urgency towards reaching global biodiversity and climate targets by 2030, there must be increased attention to center equity in dialogue and practice when designing ocean conservation, adaptation and development interventions.

Newswise: Novel inhibitor insights offer pathway to preventing PXR-associated drug resistance
Released: 14-May-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Novel inhibitor insights offer pathway to preventing PXR-associated drug resistance
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

Scientists at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital uncovered a route to blocking activity of protein notorious for eliminating drugs, offering a potential boon to cancer therapy.

Newswise: Speedy, Secure, Sustainable — That's the Future of Telecom
Released: 14-May-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Speedy, Secure, Sustainable — That's the Future of Telecom
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Advanced information processing technologies offer greener telecommunications and strong data security for millions, a study led by University of Maryland researchers revealed. A new device that can process information using a small amount of light could enable energy-efficient and secure communications.

Released: 14-May-2024 9:00 AM EDT
‘MUSIC map’ reveals some brain cells age faster and are more prevalent in Alzheimer’s
University of California San Diego

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have discovered that some brain cells age more rapidly than others, and they are disproportionately abundant in individuals afflicted with Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, researchers observed sex-specific differences in the aging process of certain brain cells, with the female cortex exhibiting a higher ratio of “old” oligodendrocytes to “old” neurons compared to the male cortex.

   
Newswise: Using artificial intelligence to speed up and improve the most computationally-intensive aspects of plasma physics in fusion
Released: 14-May-2024 8:00 AM EDT
Using artificial intelligence to speed up and improve the most computationally-intensive aspects of plasma physics in fusion
Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are using artificial intelligence to perfect the design of the vessels surrounding the super-hot plasma, optimize heating methods and maintain stable control of the reaction for increasingly long periods.

Released: 13-May-2024 3:05 PM EDT
Herpes cure with gene editing makes progress in laboratory studies
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Center

Researchers at Fred Hutch Cancer Center have found in pre-clinical studies that an experimental gene therapy for genital and oral herpes removed 90% or more of the infection and suppressed how much virus can be released from an infected individual, which suggests that the therapy would also reduce the spread of the virus.

Released: 13-May-2024 12:05 PM EDT
New research challenges widespread beliefs about why we’re attracted to certain voices
McMaster University

New insights into how people perceive the human voice are challenging beliefs about which voices we find attractive. Previous studies have linked vocal averageness and attractiveness, finding that the more average a voice sounds, the higher it is rated in attractiveness.

Newswise: Autism’s Missing Microbes May Influence Social Behavior by Protecting the Gut
Released: 13-May-2024 8:00 AM EDT
Autism’s Missing Microbes May Influence Social Behavior by Protecting the Gut
University of Utah Health

For people with autism, constipation, diarrhea, and abdominal pain often go along with the social struggles and repetitive behaviors that define the condition. This has prompted many to wonder whether gastrointestinal (GI) problems arise due to autism’s behavioral or sensory features, or whether they might instead contribute to them.

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This news release is embargoed until 13-May-2024 5:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 10-May-2024 1:00 AM EDT

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Newswise:Video Embedded designer-peptoids-mimic-nature-s-helices
VIDEO
Released: 9-May-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Designer Peptoids Mimic Nature’s Helices
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PNNL researchers learn to control peptoid “handedness,” one key to precision drug delivery and diagnostics.

   
Released: 9-May-2024 2:05 PM EDT
New machine learning algorithm promises advances in computing
Ohio State University

Systems controlled by next-generation computing algorithms could give rise to better and more efficient machine learning products, a new study suggests.

Released: 9-May-2024 10:05 AM EDT
Adding immune-boosting agent to personalized cancer vaccine supercharges the body's immune defense against malignant brain tumors
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Investigators at the UCLA Health Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have pinpointed a combination immunotherapy treatment that enhances the immune response for people with malignant gliomas, an aggressive type of brain tumor that is fast growing and difficult to treat.

Newswise: Using AI and Social Media to Track Depression in Communities
Released: 8-May-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Using AI and Social Media to Track Depression in Communities
Stony Brook University

A study that used artificial intelligence (AI) and social media posts to assess the rates of depression and anxiety in nearly half of American counties found that the AI-generated measurements produced more reliable assessments than population surveys. The findings are published in Nature Digital Medicine.

   
Newswise: NASA's Webb Hints at Possible Atmosphere Surrounding Rocky Exoplanet
Released: 8-May-2024 11:15 AM EDT
NASA's Webb Hints at Possible Atmosphere Surrounding Rocky Exoplanet
Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

These days, detecting a planetary atmosphere tens or even hundreds of light-years from Earth might not sound like such a big deal. Scientists have found signs of atmosphere surrounding dozens of exoplanets over the past two decades.

Newswise: GUIDE team develops computational approach to redesign antibodies for broader effectiveness against viral pandemics
7-May-2024 6:05 PM EDT
GUIDE team develops computational approach to redesign antibodies for broader effectiveness against viral pandemics
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

In a groundbreaking development for addressing future viral pandemics, a multi-institutional team involving Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers has successfully combined an artificial intelligence-backed platform with supercomputing to redesign and restore the effectiveness of antibodies whose ability to fight viruses has been compromised by viral evolution. The work was published in the journal Nature.

   
Newswise: Mount Sinai Scientists Unravel How Psychedelic Drugs Interact with Serotonin Receptors to Potentially Produce Therapeutic Benefits
7-May-2024 3:05 PM EDT
Mount Sinai Scientists Unravel How Psychedelic Drugs Interact with Serotonin Receptors to Potentially Produce Therapeutic Benefits
Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have shed valuable light on the complex mechanisms by which a class of psychedelic drugs binds to and activates serotonin receptors to produce potential therapeutic effects in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety.

Newswise: ‘Mathematical microscope’ reveals novel, energy-efficient mechanism of working memory that works even during sleep
6-May-2024 5:05 PM EDT
‘Mathematical microscope’ reveals novel, energy-efficient mechanism of working memory that works even during sleep
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

UCLA Health researchers have discovered a mechanism that creates memories while reducing metabolic cost, even during sleep. This efficient memory occurs in a part of the brain that is crucial for learning and memory, and where Alzheimer’s disease begins.

Newswise: Mobile teams bring COVID-19 vaccines to rural villages in Sierra Leone
Released: 7-May-2024 4:05 PM EDT
Mobile teams bring COVID-19 vaccines to rural villages in Sierra Leone
College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign

A new international research project showed that intervention with mobile vaccination teams in Sierra Leone is an effective way of reaching rural populations to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates.

Released: 7-May-2024 4:05 PM EDT
X-ray study offers first look at a quantum version of the liquid-crystal phase
Argonne National Laboratory

A team of scientists, with help from Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source, have demonstrated the existence of an elusive state of matter known as quantum spin nematic.

Newswise: Researchers Engineer Yeast to Transport Medicines and Lower Inflammation for Potential Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Released: 7-May-2024 9:05 AM EDT
Researchers Engineer Yeast to Transport Medicines and Lower Inflammation for Potential Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease
University of North Carolina School of Medicine

Researchers at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy and the UNC School of Medicine have engineered a probiotic yeast that enhances probiotic absorption in the gut and has the ability to suppress and even reverse inflammation in animals.

Newswise: Groundbreaking Microcapacitors Could Power Chips of the Future
Released: 6-May-2024 9:00 AM EDT
Groundbreaking Microcapacitors Could Power Chips of the Future
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Berkeley Lab scientists have achieved record-high energy and power densities in microcapacitors made with engineered thin films, using materials and fabrication techniques already widespread in chip manufacturing.

Released: 3-May-2024 2:05 AM EDT
Genetics, not lack of oxygen, causes cerebral palsy in quarter of cases
University of Adelaide

The world’s largest study of cerebral palsy (CP) genetics has discovered genetic defects are most likely responsible for more than a quarter of cases in Chinese children, rather than a lack of oxygen at birth as previously thought.

     
Released: 2-May-2024 12:05 AM EDT
When Working Out, Males Are Programmed to Burn More Fat, while Females Recycle It—at Least in Rats
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Vigorous exercise burns fat more in males than in females, but the benefits of exercise are broad for both sexes.

Newswise: First Steps Toward a Whole-Body Map of Molecular Responses to Exercise
Released: 1-May-2024 6:05 PM EDT
First Steps Toward a Whole-Body Map of Molecular Responses to Exercise
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

PNNL contributes to a nationwide research consortium investigating the molecular mechanisms triggered by endurance training.

Newswise: Researchers offer US roadmap to close the carbon cycle
Released: 1-May-2024 3:05 PM EDT
Researchers offer US roadmap to close the carbon cycle
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and six other Department of Energy national laboratories have developed a United States-based perspective for achieving net-zero carbon emissions. The roadmap was recently published in the journal Nature Reviews Chemistry.

Released: 1-May-2024 2:05 PM EDT
Machine learning tool identifies rare, undiagnosed immune disorders through patients’ electronic health records
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

Researchers say a machine learning tool can identify many patients with rare, undiagnosed diseases years earlier, potentially improving outcomes and reducing cost and morbidity. The findings, led by researchers at UCLA Health, are described in Science Translational Medicine.

Newswise: Roadmap to Close the Carbon Cycle
Released: 1-May-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Roadmap to Close the Carbon Cycle
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

Reaching net-zero carbon emissions goals requires finding transformative paths to manage carbon in difficult-to-electrify economic sectors.

29-Apr-2024 11:05 AM EDT
Study: Hillocks challenge our understanding of lung biology
Tufts University

A research team from Tufts University School of Medicine and Massachusetts General Hospital is now reporting evidence that hillocks and their stem cells are physiologically distinct from other cells within the lung and consist of a stratified outer layer of scale-like squamous cells that protect an underlying layer of rapidly expanding basal stem cells that are capable of restoring airway tissue after injury.

Newswise: Biodegradable ‘living plastic’ houses bacterial spores that help it break down
29-Apr-2024 6:05 PM EDT
Biodegradable ‘living plastic’ houses bacterial spores that help it break down
University of California San Diego

A new type of bioplastic could help reduce the plastic industry’s environmental footprint. Researchers have developed a biodegradable form of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) filled with bacterial spores that, when exposed to nutrients present in compost, germinate and break down the material at the end of its life cycle.

Newswise: Researchers reveal how protein modifications power T cells
Released: 29-Apr-2024 1:05 PM EDT
Researchers reveal how protein modifications power T cells
La Jolla Institute for Immunology

This method is a major leap forward for scientists investigating how proteins do their jobs in the immune system. “This method basically creates an entire new kind of world of experiments that people can do..."

Newswise: How can forests be reforested in a climate-friendly way?
26-Apr-2024 1:00 AM EDT
How can forests be reforested in a climate-friendly way?
University of Vienna

Europe's forests have already been severely affected by climate change. Thousands of hectares of trees have already died due to drought and bark beetles. Scientists from the University of Vienna and the Technical University of Munich have now investigated which trees can be used for reforestation.

Newswise: Probing the effects of interplanetary space on asteroid Ryugu
25-Apr-2024 8:05 PM EDT
Probing the effects of interplanetary space on asteroid Ryugu
Hokkaido University

Samples reveal evidence of changes experienced by the surface of asteroid Ryugu, some probably due to micrometeoroid bombardment.

Newswise: After 25 Years, Researchers Uncover Genetic Cause of Rare Neurological Disease
25-Apr-2024 5:00 AM EDT
After 25 Years, Researchers Uncover Genetic Cause of Rare Neurological Disease
University of Utah Health

Spinocerebellar ataxia 4 is a devastating progressive movement disorder. A multinational study has now conclusively identified the genetic difference that causes the disease, bringing answers to families and opening the door to future treatments.



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