Curated News: Nature (journal)

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Released: 7-May-2021 2:25 PM EDT
Scientists discover how to trick cancer cells to consume toxic drugs
Massachusetts General Hospital

New research led by a team at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) points to a promising strategy to boost tumors' intake of cancer drugs, thereby increasing the effectiveness of chemotherapy treatments. The group's findings are published in Nature Nanotechnology.

Newswise: Molecular analysis identifies key differences in lungs of cystic fibrosis patients
Released: 6-May-2021 4:50 PM EDT
Molecular analysis identifies key differences in lungs of cystic fibrosis patients
Cedars-Sinai

A team of researchers from UCLA, Cedars-Sinai and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has developed a first-of-its-kind molecular catalog of cells in healthy lungs and the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis.

Newswise: Researchers speed identification of DNA regions that regulate gene expression
Released: 6-May-2021 12:10 PM EDT
Researchers speed identification of DNA regions that regulate gene expression
St. Jude Children's Research Hospital

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists have developed a highly efficient method to address a major challenge in biology—identifying the genetic ‘switches’ that regulate gene expression.

Released: 5-May-2021 11:05 PM EDT
NUS scientists found a key element that affects how genes are expressed in blood stem cells
National University of Singapore

Researchers from the Cancer Science Institute of Singapore at the National University of Singapore have found a major molecular “switch” that controls how cells turn their genes on and off. This process ensures the cell correctly and adequately performs its assigned tasks in the body. The research team’s discovery will likely improve the understanding of how normal stem cells function, and could possibly lead to insights into disease.

Newswise: First nanoscale look at a reaction that limits the efficiency of generating clean hydrogen fuel
Released: 5-May-2021 5:05 PM EDT
First nanoscale look at a reaction that limits the efficiency of generating clean hydrogen fuel
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Transitioning to a hydrogen economy will require massive production of cheap, clean hydrogen gas for fuel and chemical feedstocks. New tools allow scientists to zoom in on a catalytic reaction that’s been a bottleneck in efforts to generate hydrogen from water more efficiently.

Newswise: Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Released: 5-May-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Story Tips from Johns Hopkins Experts on COVID-19
Johns Hopkins Medicine

How Can Scientists Predict a COVID-19 Outbreak? There's an App for that; Johns Hopkins Medicine Collaborates with the City and Faith Organizations to Offer Guidance on Safely Reopening Houses of Worship; Johns Hopkins Hospital Patient ‘Grateful to Still Be Alive’ After Two-Month Hospitalization with COVID-19; “12 Things You Need To Know” Infographic...

Newswise: Antarctica Remains the Wild Card for Sea-Level Rise Estimates Through 2100
Released: 5-May-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Antarctica Remains the Wild Card for Sea-Level Rise Estimates Through 2100
Los Alamos National Laboratory

A massive collaborative research project covered in the journal Nature this week offers projections to the year 2100 of future sea-level rise from all sources of land ice, offering the most complete projections created to date.

Newswise: Catastrophic Sea-Level Rise from Antarctic Melting is Possible with Severe Global Warming
Released: 5-May-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Catastrophic Sea-Level Rise from Antarctic Melting is Possible with Severe Global Warming
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

The Antarctic ice sheet is much less likely to become unstable and cause dramatic sea-level rise in upcoming centuries if the world follows policies that keep global warming below a key 2015 Paris climate agreement target, according to a Rutgers coauthored study. But if global warming exceeds the target – 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) – the risk of ice shelves around the ice sheet’s perimeter melting would increase significantly, and their collapse would trigger rapid Antarctic melting. That would result in at least 0.07 inches of global average sea-level rise a year in 2060 and beyond, according to the study in the journal Nature.

Newswise: Study Shows Independent Evolutionary Origins of Vertebrate Dentitions
5-May-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Study Shows Independent Evolutionary Origins of Vertebrate Dentitions
University of Bristol

The origins of a pretty smile have long been sought in the fearsome jaws of living sharks which have been considered living fossils reflecting the ancestral condition for vertebrate tooth development and inference of its evolution. However, this view ignores real fossils which more accurately reflect the nature of ancient ancestors.

Newswise: Rare Genetic Disease Caused by Mutations in Protein that Controls RNA Metabolism
5-May-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Rare Genetic Disease Caused by Mutations in Protein that Controls RNA Metabolism
Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Mutations in a protein called GEMIN5 cause developmental delay and loss of coordination in young children.

Newswise: Molecular Analysis Identifies Key Differences in Lungs of Cystic Fibrosis Patients
4-May-2021 10:05 PM EDT
Molecular Analysis Identifies Key Differences in Lungs of Cystic Fibrosis Patients
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Health Sciences

A team of researchers from UCLA, Cedars-Sinai and the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has developed a first-of-its-kind molecular catalog of cells in healthy lungs and the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis. The findings could help scientists in their search for specific cell types that represent prime targets for genetic and cell therapies for cystic fibrosis.

4-May-2021 4:30 PM EDT
Researchers Identify Cause and Drug Targets for Bewildering Rare Children’s Disease
Mount Sinai Health System

Researchers have finally cracked the code of a bewildering pediatric disease that sets off a characteristic cytokine storm—a harmful immune system overaction resembling one that arises in COVID-19 cases—and can lead to catastrophic multisystem organ failure or neurodegeneration. Their study, which identifies the cause of the cytokine storm and possible treatments, was published in Nature Medicine in May.

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Released: 4-May-2021 1:25 PM EDT
Chemical 'nose' sniffs critical differences in DNA structures
University of California, Riverside

Small changes in the structure of DNA have been implicated in breast cancer and other diseases, but they've been extremely difficult to detect -- until now.

Newswise: Hopkins-Led Research Team Takes Gene Mutation Detection in Blood to the Next Level
Released: 4-May-2021 1:00 PM EDT
Hopkins-Led Research Team Takes Gene Mutation Detection in Blood to the Next Level
Johns Hopkins Medicine

Next-generation gene sequencing (NGS) technologies —in which millions of DNA molecules are simultaneously but individually analyzed— theoretically provides researchers and clinicians the ability to noninvasively identify mutations in the blood stream. Identifying such mutations enables earlier diagnosis of cancer and can inform treatment decisions. Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a new technology to overcome the inefficiencies and high error rates common among next-generation sequencing techniques that have previously limited their clinical application.

4-May-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Trial demonstrates early AI-guided detection of heart disease in routine practice
Mayo Clinic

Heart disease can take a number of forms, but some types of heart disease, such as asymptomatic low ejection fraction, can be hard to recognize, especially in the early stages when treatment would be most effective. The ECG AI-Guided Screening for Low Ejection Fraction, or EAGLE, trial set out to determine whether an artificial intelligence (AI) screening tool developed to detect low ejection fraction using data from an EKG could improve the diagnosis of this condition in routine practice. Study findings are published in Nature Medicine.

Newswise: Tiny plastic particles in the environment
Released: 4-May-2021 9:25 AM EDT
Tiny plastic particles in the environment
Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology

The images leave no one cold: giant vortices of floating plastic trash in the world's oceans with sometimes devastating consequences for their inhabitants – the sobering legacy of our modern lifestyle. Weathering and degradation processes produce countless tiny particles that can now be detected in virtually all ecosystems. But how dangerous are the smallest of them, so-called nanoplastics? Are they a ticking time bomb, as alarming media reports suggest? In the latest issue of the journal Nature Nanotechnology, a team from Empa and ETH Zurich examines the state of current knowledge – or lack thereof – and points out how these important questions should be addressed.

Newswise: New class of drug gives hope to some ovarian cancer patients
Released: 3-May-2021 6:20 PM EDT
New class of drug gives hope to some ovarian cancer patients
University of Washington School of Medicine

Rucaparib is in a relatively new class of drugs - Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase or PARP inhibitors - which have been approved for therapy in ovarian cancers. This study provides insights into both how the cancers resist treatments, and which patients may respond favorably to the drug.

Newswise: University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers reveal elusive inner workings of antioxidant enzyme with therapeutic potential
Released: 3-May-2021 4:00 PM EDT
University of Nebraska Medical Center researchers reveal elusive inner workings of antioxidant enzyme with therapeutic potential
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

The enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase helps maintain human health by keeping the amount of reactive oxygen molecules in cells under control. Using neutron scattering at ORNL, researchers obtained a complete atomic portrait of the enzyme, revealing key information about its catalytic mechanism.

Released: 3-May-2021 2:30 PM EDT
Short-term exposure to air pollution may impede cognition; Aspirin could help
Columbia University, Mailman School of Public Health

Exposure to air pollution, even over the course of just a few weeks, can impede mental performance, according to a new study led by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

Newswise: Story tips: Stealthy air leak detection, carbon to chemicals and recycling goes large
Released: 3-May-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Story tips: Stealthy air leak detection, carbon to chemicals and recycling goes large
Oak Ridge National Laboratory

ORNL story tips: Stealthy air leak detection, carbon to chemicals and recycling goes large

Newswise:Video Embedded prehistoric-humans-first-traversed-australia-by-superhighways
VIDEO
Released: 3-May-2021 1:05 PM EDT
Prehistoric humans first traversed Australia by ‘superhighways’
Sandia National Laboratories

An international team of scientists using a Sandia National Laboratories supercomputer in the largest reconstruction ever attempted of prehistoric travel has mapped the probable “superhighways” that led to the first peopling of Australia.

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Released: 30-Apr-2021 1:50 PM EDT
Brazilian Amazon released more carbon than it stored in 2010s
University of Exeter

The Brazilian Amazon rainforest released more carbon than it stored over the last decade - with degradation a bigger cause than deforestation - according to new research.

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Released: 30-Apr-2021 12:10 PM EDT
Northern forest fires could accelerate climate change
Boston University

New research indicates that the computer-based models currently used to simulate how Earth's climate will change in the future underestimate the impact that forest fires and drying climate are having on the world's northernmost forests, which make up the largest forest biome on the planet.

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Released: 30-Apr-2021 10:45 AM EDT
New brain-like computing device simulates human learning
Northwestern University

Researchers have developed a brain-like computing device that is capable of learning by association.

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Released: 29-Apr-2021 4:35 PM EDT
Global glacier retreat has accelerated
ETH Zürich

Glaciers are a sensitive indicator of climate change - and one that can be easily observed. Regardless of altitude or latitude, glaciers have been melting at a high rate since the mid-?20th century.

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Released: 29-Apr-2021 4:35 PM EDT
An ocean 13 million years in the making
King Abdullah University of Science & Technology (KAUST)

Spreading of the seafloor in the Red Sea basin is found to have begun along its entire length around 13 million years ago, making its underlying oceanic crust twice as old as previously believed.

Newswise:Video Embedded nsu-researcher-part-of-a-flagship-study-on-vertebrate-genomes
VIDEO
Released: 29-Apr-2021 1:45 PM EDT
NSU Researcher Part of a Flagship Study on Vertebrate Genomes
Nova Southeastern University

Unprecedented novel discoveries have implications for characterizing biodiversity for all life, conservation and human health and disease.

Released: 29-Apr-2021 11:50 AM EDT
New optical hydrogen sensors eliminate risk of sparking
University of Georgia

A new study published in Nature Communications documents an inexpensive, spark-free, optical-based hydrogen sensor that is more sensitive — and faster — than previous models.

Newswise: Blueprint for a robust quantum future
Released: 29-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Blueprint for a robust quantum future
Argonne National Laboratory

Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory, the University of Chicago and scientific organizations in Japan, Korea and Hungary have established an invaluable resource for those looking to discover new quantum systems.

Newswise: Helpful, engineered 'living' machines in the future?
Released: 28-Apr-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Helpful, engineered 'living' machines in the future?
Penn State Materials Research Institute

Engineered soft autonomous materials that respond to stimuli hold great potential for a variety of applications from maintaining infrastructure to cleaning the environment.

Released: 28-Apr-2021 1:40 PM EDT
Scientists' discovery of blood clotting mechanism could lead to new antithrombotic drugs
Lehigh University

Under normal, healthy circulatory conditions, the von Willebrand Factor (vWF) keeps to itself. The large and mysterious glycoprotein moves through the blood, balled up tightly, its reaction sites unexposed. But when significant bleeding occurs, it springs into action, initiating the clotting process.

Newswise: Mapping the Electronic States in an Exotic Superconductor
Released: 28-Apr-2021 12:25 PM EDT
Mapping the Electronic States in an Exotic Superconductor
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists mapped the electronic states in an exotic superconductor. The maps point to the composition range necessary for topological superconductivity, a state that could enable more robust quantum computing.

Newswise: Genome sequencing delivers hope and warning for the survival of the Sumatran rhinoceros
Released: 28-Apr-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Genome sequencing delivers hope and warning for the survival of the Sumatran rhinoceros
Stockholm University

A study led by researchers at the Centre for Palaeogenetics in Stockholm shows that the last remaining populations of the Sumatran rhinoceros display surprisingly low levels of inbreeding. The researchers sequenced the genomes from 21 modern and historical rhinoceros' specimens, which enabled them to investigate the genetic health in rhinos living today as well as a population that recently became extinct. These findings are published today in the journal Nature Communications.

27-Apr-2021 6:05 PM EDT
Treatment Found to Improve Cognitive Function in Patients With Fragile X Syndrome
Rush University Medical Center

An experimental treatment produced improvements in cognitive function and language in patients with fragile X syndrome, according to study results published on April 29 in Nature Medicine. Fragile X syndrome (known as FXS for short) is the most common known genetic cause of autism and the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability.

Newswise: Watching the Evolution of Nanostructures in Thin Films
Released: 27-Apr-2021 3:50 PM EDT
Watching the Evolution of Nanostructures in Thin Films
Department of Energy, Office of Science

Scientists have found a way to turn X-ray fluorescence into an ultra-high position-sensitive probe to measure nanostructures in thin films. The fluorescence reveals the evolution of nanostructures in real time with nearly atomic-level resolution, something no other technique has achieved. This allows scientists to watch nanostructures in thin films evolve with unprecedented precision and design thin films for new applications.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 1:30 PM EDT
New mouse model provides first platform to study late-onset Alzheimer’s disease
University of California, Irvine

University of California, Irvine biologists have developed a new genetically engineered mouse model that, unlike its predecessors, is based on the most common form of Alzheimer’s disease. The advance holds promise for making new strides against the neurodegenerative disease as cases continue to soar.

Newswise: New method preserves viable fruit fly embryos in liquid nitrogen
Released: 27-Apr-2021 12:05 PM EDT
New method preserves viable fruit fly embryos in liquid nitrogen
University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering

A University of Minnesota team has developed a first-of-its-kind method that cryopreserves fruit fly embryos so they can be successfully recovered and developed into adult insects. Cryopreservation of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) is crucial to genetics research and critical to scientific breakthroughs benefiting human health.

Newswise: Neural implant monitors multiple brain areas at once, provides new neuroscience insights
Released: 27-Apr-2021 11:00 AM EDT
Neural implant monitors multiple brain areas at once, provides new neuroscience insights
University of California San Diego

How do different parts of the brain communicate with each other during learning and memory formation? A study by researchers at UC San Diego takes a first step at answering this fundamental neuroscience question, thanks to a neural implant that monitors multiple brain regions at the same time.

Released: 27-Apr-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Texas Biomed shares critical work in development of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine
Texas Biomedical Research Institute

The work performed by dozens of scientists at Pfizer, BioNTech, Texas Biomed, the SNPRC and scientific partners around the world from April to July of 2020 is now published in the scientific journal Nature. In the paper titled “Immunogenic BNT162b vaccines protect rhesus macaques from SARS-CoV-2” published on Feb. 1, 2021, scientists noted that the vaccine candidate tested for Pfizer “protected the lower respiratory tract from the presence of viral RNA and with no evidence of disease enhancement.”

Newswise: Machine Learning Algorithm Helps Unravel the Physics Underlying Quantum Systems
27-Apr-2021 4:05 AM EDT
Machine Learning Algorithm Helps Unravel the Physics Underlying Quantum Systems
University of Bristol

Scientists from the University of Bristol’s Quantum Engineering Technology Labs (QETLabs) have developed an algorithm that provides valuable insights into the physics underlying quantum systems - paving the way for significant advances in quantum computation and sensing, and potentially turning a new page in scientific investigation.

Newswise: Chemical cocktail activates stem cells, promotes repair after muscle damage
Released: 26-Apr-2021 3:55 PM EDT
Chemical cocktail activates stem cells, promotes repair after muscle damage
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

The technique used in this preclinical study could aid tissue regeneration following severe accidents, surgical resections, or progressive muscle loss due to age or genetic disease.

Newswise:Video Embedded new-rapid-covid-19-test-the-result-of-university-industry-partnership
VIDEO
Released: 26-Apr-2021 3:25 PM EDT
New rapid COVID-19 test the result of university-industry partnership
UC Davis Health

A partnership between UC Davis and Maurice J. Gallagher, Jr., chairman and CEO of Allegiant Travel Company, has led to a 20-minute COVID-19 test. The method pairs a mass spectrometer with a powerful machine-learning platform to detect SARS-CoV-2 in nasal swabs. A recent study published in Nature Scientific Reports shows the test to be 98.3% accurate for positive COVID-19 tests and 96% for negative tests.

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Released: 26-Apr-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Genome sequencing delivers hope and warning for the survival of the Sumatran rhinoceros
Stockholm University

A study led by researchers at the Centre for Palaeogenetics in Stockholm shows that the last remaining populations of the Sumatran rhinoceros display surprisingly low levels of inbreeding.

Newswise: First Australian populations followed footpath ‘superhighways’ across the continent
26-Apr-2021 10:45 AM EDT
First Australian populations followed footpath ‘superhighways’ across the continent
Santa Fe Institute

By simulating the physiology and decisions of early way-finders, an international team of archaeologists, geographers, ecologists, and computer scientists has mapped the probable “superhighways” that led to the first peopling of the Australian continent some 50,000-70,000 years ago.

Released: 26-Apr-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Anemia Discovery Points to More Effective Treatment Approaches
University of Virginia Health System

A combination of inexpensive oral medications may be able to treat fatigue-inducing anemias caused by chronic diseases and inflammation, a new discovery from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Newswise: Draining brain’s debris enhances Alzheimer’s therapies in mice
26-Apr-2021 8:00 AM EDT
Draining brain’s debris enhances Alzheimer’s therapies in mice
Washington University in St. Louis

Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that improving the function of the brain's drainage network, known as the meningeal lymphatics, can make certain experimental Alzheimer’s therapies more effective in mice.

Newswise: 262940_web.jpg
Released: 23-Apr-2021 2:45 PM EDT
Red Sea is no longer a baby ocean
Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel (GEOMAR)

It is 2,250 kilometers long, but only 355 kilometers wide at its widest point - on a world map, the Red Sea hardly resembles an ocean. But this is deceptive.

Released: 23-Apr-2021 2:35 PM EDT
Muscle gene linked to type 2 diabetes
Lund University

People with type 2 diabetes tend to have poorer muscle function than others.

Newswise: Among COVID-19 survivors, an increased risk of death, serious illness
Released: 22-Apr-2021 11:55 AM EDT
Among COVID-19 survivors, an increased risk of death, serious illness
Washington University in St. Louis

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows that even mild cases of COVID-19 increase the risk of death in the six months following diagnosis and that this risk increases with disease severity. The comprehensive study also catalogues the wide-ranging and long-term health problems often triggered by the infection, even among those not hospitalized.


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