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Released: 14-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Stents inspired by paper-cutting art can deliver drugs to the GI tract
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Inspired by kirigami, the Japanese art of folding and cutting paper to create three-dimensional structures, MIT engineers and their collaborators have designed a new type of stent that could be used to deliver drugs to the gastrointestinal tract, respiratory tract, or other tubular organs in the body.

Newswise: Scientists Discover How Oxygen Loss Saps a Lithium-ion Battery’s Voltage
Released: 14-Jun-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Scientists Discover How Oxygen Loss Saps a Lithium-ion Battery’s Voltage
SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

SLAC and Stanford scientists took a unique and detailed nanoscale look at how oxygen seeps out of lithium-ion battery electrodes, sapping their energy over time. The results could suggest a fix.

14-Jun-2021 10:05 AM EDT
Making a Meal of DNA in the Seafloor
University of Vienna

While best known as the code for genetic information, DNA is also a nutrient for specialised microbes. An international team of researchers led by Kenneth Wasmund and Alexander Loy from the University of Vienna has discovered several bacteria in sediment samples from the Atlantic Ocean that use DNA as a food source.

Released: 14-Jun-2021 10:30 AM EDT
New Combination of Materials Provides Progress Toward Quantum Computing
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

In research published today in Nature Communications, engineers from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute demonstrated how, when the TMDC materials they make are stacked in a particular geometry, the interaction that occurs between particles gives researchers more control over the devices’ properties. Specifically, the interaction between electrons becomes so strong that they form a new structure known as a correlated insulating state. This is an important step, researchers said, toward developing quantum emitters needed for future quantum simulation and computing.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 16-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 14-Jun-2021 5:00 AM EDT

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Newswise: 267642_web.jpg
Released: 11-Jun-2021 5:20 PM EDT
Combating Maritime Litter
Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon

Plastic bottles drifting in the sea; bags in the stomachs of turtles; Covid-19 masks dancing in the surf: few images are as unpleasant to look at as those that show the contamination of our oceans.

access_time Embargo lifts in 2 days
Embargo will expire: 16-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT Released to reporters: 11-Jun-2021 1:05 PM EDT

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 16-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Newswise: 267069_web.jpg
Released: 10-Jun-2021 4:40 PM EDT
'Vegan spider silk' provides sustainable alternative to single-use plastics
University of Cambridge

Researchers have created a plant-based, sustainable, scalable material that could replace single-use plastics in many consumer products.

Released: 10-Jun-2021 11:40 AM EDT
Researchers' algorithm to make CRISPR gene editing more precise
University of Copenhagen, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences

It eventually became a Nobel prize-winning revolution when researchers first engineered CRISPR as a gene editing technology for bacterial, plant, animal and human cells.

Newswise: Losing Nature Impacts Black, Hispanic, and Low-Income Americans Most
8-Jun-2021 5:10 PM EDT
Losing Nature Impacts Black, Hispanic, and Low-Income Americans Most
University of Vermont

When nature vanishes, people of color and low-income Americans disproportionally lose critical environmental and health benefits--including air quality, crop productivity and disease control--a new study in Nature Communications finds.

Newswise: Healthy Fat Impacted by Change in Diet and Circadian Clock, Study Finds
Released: 9-Jun-2021 7:05 PM EDT
Healthy Fat Impacted by Change in Diet and Circadian Clock, Study Finds
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Changing your eating habits or altering your circadian clock can impact healthy fat tissue throughout your lifespan, according to a preclinical study published today in Nature by researchers with The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

Newswise: 267392_web.jpg
Released: 9-Jun-2021 2:10 PM EDT
A study shows the unexpected effect of black holes beyond their own galaxies
Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC)

At the heart of almost every sufficiently massive galaxy there is a black hole whose gravitational field, although very intense, affects only a small region around the centre of the galaxy.

Newswise: Not Just A Phase For RNAS
Released: 9-Jun-2021 11:05 AM EDT
Not Just A Phase For RNAS
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – June 9, 2021 – A phenomenon in which an RNA named NORAD drives a protein named Pumilio to form liquid droplets in cells, much like oil in water, appears to tightly regulate the activity of Pumilio. A new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests that such RNA-driven “phase separation,” in turn, protects against genome instability, premature aging, and neurodegenerative diseases, and may represent a previously unrecognized way for RNAs to regulate cellular processes.

Newswise: Measuring Impact of Double- Cropping
Released: 9-Jun-2021 9:55 AM EDT
Measuring Impact of Double- Cropping
University of Delaware

A new study published in Nature Food quantifies for the first time the impact that double-cropping had on helping Brazil achieve its national grain boom. The University of Delaware's Jing Gao was a co-author on the study that included collaborators from institutions in China and Brazil.

Newswise: Meiosis: Mind the gap
Released: 9-Jun-2021 9:00 AM EDT
Meiosis: Mind the gap
University of Vienna

Meiosis is a specialized cell division process required to generate gametes, the reproductive cells of an organism. During meiosis, paternal and maternal chromosomes duplicate, pair, and exchange parts of their DNA in a process called meiotic recombination. In order to mediate this exchange of genetic material, cells introduce double strand breaks (DSBs) into their chromosomal DNA. Scientists from the lab of Franz Klein from the Department of Chromosome Biology at the Max Perutz Labs, a joint venture of the University of Vienna and the Medical University of Vienna, have now discovered that cells sometimes liberate DNA fragments at sites of paired, or double, DSBs. Whilst this presents an obvious risk of germline mutations as a consequence of erroneous repair or of integration of fragments from elsewhere at break sites, it may also be a source of evolutionary diversity. The study is published as a research article in Nature.

Newswise: Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Generates Robust Immune Responses Against COVID-19 Variants
Released: 9-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Single-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Generates Robust Immune Responses Against COVID-19 Variants
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a new study published in Nature, Dan Barouch, MD, PhD, Director of BIDMC's Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, and colleagues report on the antibody and cellular immune responses generated by the Ad26.COV2.S vaccine against the original viral strain and against SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern. The team found that this vaccine induced immune responses against all the viral variants.

Newswise: How Your Phone Can Predict Depression and Lead to Personalized Treatment
8-Jun-2021 1:50 PM EDT
How Your Phone Can Predict Depression and Lead to Personalized Treatment
University of California San Diego Health

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine used a combination of modalities, such as measuring brain function, cognition and lifestyle factors, to generate individualized predictions of depression.

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Released: 8-Jun-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Tree diversity may save the forest: Advocating for biodiversity to mitigate climate change
Yokohama National University

When it comes to climate change, policymakers may fail to see the trees for the forest. Turns out that the trees may be the answer after all, according to a study published by authors from more than seven countries on June 3rd in Nature Climate Change.

Newswise: Largest-ever Pre-adolescent Brain Activation Study Reveals Cognitive Function Maps
Released: 8-Jun-2021 12:45 PM EDT
Largest-ever Pre-adolescent Brain Activation Study Reveals Cognitive Function Maps
University of Vermont

Youth brain activation data from the largest longitudinal neuroimaging study to date provides valuable new information on the cognitive processes and brain systems that underlie adolescent development and might contribute to mental and physical health challenges in adulthood.

Newswise: Scientists develop the ‘evotype’ to help unlock the power of evolution for better engineering biology
Released: 8-Jun-2021 12:05 PM EDT
Scientists develop the ‘evotype’ to help unlock the power of evolution for better engineering biology
University of Bristol

Scientists from the University of Bristol have pioneered a new approach to help biological engineers both harness and design the evolutionary potential of new biosystems. Their concept of the ‘evotype’ lays a foundation for the next generation of stable, safe and self-improving biotechnologies.

Newswise: Microgel coating gives donor cells a boost in reversing pulmonary fibrosis
Released: 8-Jun-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Microgel coating gives donor cells a boost in reversing pulmonary fibrosis
University of Illinois at Chicago

Researchers have shown that even after lung tissue has been damaged, it may be possible to reverse fibrosis and promote tissue repair through treatment with microgel-coated mesenchymal stromal cells.

Newswise: First Global Statistical Analysis of Harmful Algal Blooms
Released: 8-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
First Global Statistical Analysis of Harmful Algal Blooms
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

June 8, 2021 -- The first-ever global statistical analysis of trends in harmful algal blooms (HABs) has shown that, worldwide, there is no significant increase in HABs events, but that in some regions, events that include toxic species of algae affecting humans and wildlife are on the rise. In addition, the study finds that human activity, primarily aquaculture in coastal waters, and the economic impacts that HABs event cause to the fast-growing growing industry, is likely behind the perceived increase.

Newswise: How COVID-19 Wreaks Havoc on Human Lungs
3-Jun-2021 10:15 AM EDT
How COVID-19 Wreaks Havoc on Human Lungs
Brookhaven National Laboratory

Scientists have published the first detailed atomic-level model of the SARS-CoV-2 "envelope" protein bound to a human protein essential for maintaining the lining of the lungs. The findings may speed the search for drugs to block the most severe effects of COVID-19.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 4:15 PM EDT
Unexpected discovery opens a new way to regulate blood pressure
University of Vermont

A new discovery finds that zinc plays a critical and underappreciated role in blood pressure regulation, offering a potential new pathway for therapies to treat hypertension.

Newswise: Stabilizing gassy electrolytes could make ultra-low temperature batteries safer
Released: 7-Jun-2021 3:10 PM EDT
Stabilizing gassy electrolytes could make ultra-low temperature batteries safer
University of California San Diego

A new technology could dramatically improve the safety and performance of lithium-ion batteries that operate with gas electrolytes at ultra-low temperatures. By keeping electrolytes from vaporizing, the technology can prevent pressure buildup inside the battery that leads to swelling and explosions.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 2:50 PM EDT
Popularity runs in families
Rice University

If identical versions of 20 people lived out their lives in dozens of different worlds, would the same people be popular in each world?

Released: 7-Jun-2021 2:25 PM EDT
From farm to plate: Where do global consumer dollars flow?
Cornell University

A team of researchers, led by Cornell University professors Chris Barrett and Miguel Gómez, has developed the “Global Food Dollar” method, which distributes the consumer’s net purchasing dollar across all farm and post-farmgate activities.

Released: 7-Jun-2021 2:20 PM EDT
Protein identified as new therapeutic anti-viral target for COVID-19
King's College London

New research identified a novel interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and the galectin-3-binding protein (LGALS3BP) which could be a new therapeutic anti-viral target.

Newswise: New study shows a few common bacteria account for majority of carbon use in soil
Released: 7-Jun-2021 2:10 PM EDT
New study shows a few common bacteria account for majority of carbon use in soil
Northern Arizona University

Just a few bacterial taxa found in ecosystems across the planet are responsible for more than half of carbon cycling in soils, according to new findingsfrom researchers at Northern Arizona University.

7-Jun-2021 11:00 AM EDT
A quantum step to a heat switch with no moving parts
Ohio State University

Researchers have discovered a new electronic property at the frontier between the thermal and quantum sciences in a specially engineered metal alloy – and in the process identified a promising material for future devices that could turn heat on and off with the application of a magnetic “switch.”

Newswise: NUS researchers develop world’s first blood test for real-time monitoring of cancer treatment success
Released: 7-Jun-2021 2:05 AM EDT
NUS researchers develop world’s first blood test for real-time monitoring of cancer treatment success
National University of Singapore

A team of researchers from the NUS Department of Biomedical Engineering and Institute for Health Innovation & Technology has developed a novel blood test called ExoSCOPE that could tell doctors whether cancer treatment is working for a patient, within 24 hours after the treatment. This will enable doctors to customise the treatment plan to improve patients’ chances of recovery.

Released: 4-Jun-2021 11:45 AM EDT
Understanding the skin’s defense system
Michigan State University

It can be easy to forget that the human skin is an organ. It’s also the largest one and it’s exposed, charged with keeping our inner biology safe from the perils of the outside world. But Michigan State University’s Sangbum Park is someone who never takes skin or its biological functions for granted. He’s studying skin at the cellular level to better understand it and help us support it when it’s fighting injury, infection or disease.

Released: 4-Jun-2021 11:10 AM EDT
Bacteria are connected to how babies experience fear
Michigan State University

New research from MSU shows that an infant’s gut microbiome could contain clues to help monitor and support healthy neurological development Why do some babies react to perceived danger more than others? According to new research from Michigan State University and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, part of the answer may be found in a surprising place: an infant’s digestive system.

Newswise: Giving Brown Fat A Boost to Fight Type 2 Diabetes
Released: 4-Jun-2021 10:00 AM EDT
Giving Brown Fat A Boost to Fight Type 2 Diabetes
UT Southwestern Medical Center

DALLAS – June 4, 2021 – Increasing a protein concentrated in brown fat appears to lower blood sugar, promote insulin sensitivity, and protect against fatty liver disease by remodeling white fat to a healthier state, a new study led by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The finding, published online in Nature Communications, could eventually lead to new solutions for patients with diabetes and related conditions.

Newswise: CO2 Emissions Are Rebounding, but Clean Energy Revolutions are Emerging
Released: 3-Jun-2021 9:05 PM EDT
CO2 Emissions Are Rebounding, but Clean Energy Revolutions are Emerging
University of California San Diego

At the upcoming Conference of the Parties (COP26) in November, ample discussion is likely to focus on how the world is not on track to meet the Paris Agreement’s goals of stopping warming at well below 2°C. According to a new University of California San Diego article published in Nature Energy, world diplomats will, however, find encouraging signs in emerging clean energy technology “niches”—countries, states or corporations—that are pioneering decarbonization.

Newswise: 266572_web.jpg
Released: 3-Jun-2021 3:45 PM EDT
Engineers create a programmable fiber
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

MIT researchers have created the first fiber with digital capabilities, able to sense, store, analyze, and infer activity after being sewn into a shirt.

Newswise: Scientists Discover New Approach to Stabilize Cathode Materials
Released: 3-Jun-2021 2:40 PM EDT
Scientists Discover New Approach to Stabilize Cathode Materials
Brookhaven National Laboratory

UPTON, NY—A team of researchers led by chemists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has studied an elusive property in cathode materials, called a valence gradient, to understand its effect on battery performance. The findings, published in Nature Communications, demonstrated that the valence gradient can serve as a new approach for stabilizing the structure of high-nickel-content cathodes against degradation and safety issues.

Newswise: 266541_web.jpg
Released: 3-Jun-2021 12:55 PM EDT
Extensive study identifies over a dozen existing drugs as potential COVID-19 therapies
Scripps Research Institute

Mining the world's most comprehensive drug repurposing collection for COVID-19 therapies, scientists have identified 90 existing drugs or drug candidates with antiviral activity against the coronavirus that's driving the ongoing global pandemic.

3-Jun-2021 10:00 AM EDT
AI outperforms humans in creating cancer treatments, but do doctors trust it? It depends!
University Health Network (UHN)

The impact of deploying Artificial Intelligence (AI) for radiation cancer therapy in a real-world clinical setting has been tested by Princess Margaret researchers in a unique study involving physicians and their patients.

Newswise: Preclinical research reveals that new IgM antibodies administered intranasally to fight COVID-19 more potent than commonly used ones
Released: 3-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
Preclinical research reveals that new IgM antibodies administered intranasally to fight COVID-19 more potent than commonly used ones
University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

A nasal therapy, built upon on the application of a new engineered IgM antibody therapy for COVID-19, was more effective than commonly used IgG antibodies at neutralizing the COVID-19 virus in animal models, according to research recently published by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB Health), the University of Houston, and IGM Biosciences, Inc.

Newswise: 266462_web.jpg
Released: 2-Jun-2021 1:10 PM EDT
Study pinpoints key causes of ocean circulation change
University of Exeter

Researchers have identified the key factors that influence a vital pattern of ocean currents.

Newswise: World’s Lakes Losing Oxygen Rapidly as Planet Warms
Released: 2-Jun-2021 11:15 AM EDT
World’s Lakes Losing Oxygen Rapidly as Planet Warms
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI)

Oxygen levels in the world’s temperate freshwater lakes are declining rapidly — faster than in the oceans — a trend driven largely by climate change that threatens freshwater biodiversity and drinking water quality.

Released: 2-Jun-2021 10:10 AM EDT
Analysis reveals global 'hot spots' where new coronaviruses may emerge
University of California, Berkeley

Berkeley -- Global land-use changes -- including forest fragmentation, agricultural expansion and concentrated livestock production -- are creating "hot spots" favorable for bats that carry coronaviruses and where conditions are ripe for the diseases to jump from bats to humans, finds an analysis published this week by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, the Politecnico di Milano (Polytechnic University of Milan) and Massey University of New Zealand.

Newswise: If it ain’t broke you’re not trying hard enough
Released: 2-Jun-2021 8:05 AM EDT
If it ain’t broke you’re not trying hard enough
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

A team of NIH microscopists and computer scientists used a type of artificial intelligence called a neural network to obtain clearer pictures of cells at work even with extremely low, cell-friendly light levels.

Newswise: Acoustic_Duo.jpg
Released: 2-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
World’s smallest, best acoustic amplifier emerges from 50-year-old hypothesis
Sandia National Laboratories

Scientists at Sandia National Laboratories have built the world’s smallest and best acoustic amplifier. And they did it using a concept that was all but abandoned for almost 50 years.

Newswise: Anyone can get super-hearing
Released: 2-Jun-2021 7:05 AM EDT
Anyone can get super-hearing
Aalto University

Humans can observe what and where something happens around them with their hearing, as long as sound frequencies lie between 20 Hz and 20 000 Hz. Researchers at Aalto University have now developed a new audio technique that enables people to also hear ultrasonic sources that generate sound at frequencies above 20,000 Hz with simultaneous perception of their direction.

Newswise:Video Embedded synthetic-species-developed-for-use-as-a-confinable-gene-drive
VIDEO
1-Jun-2021 2:55 PM EDT
Synthetic SPECIES Developed for Use as a Confinable Gene Drive
University of California San Diego

Scientists have developed a gene drive with a built-in genetic barrier that is designed to keep the drive under control. The researchers engineered synthetic fly species that, upon release in sufficient numbers, act as gene drives that can spread locally and be reversed if desired.

Released: 1-Jun-2021 3:05 PM EDT
Global warming already responsible for one in three heat-related deaths
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Between 1991 and 2018, more than a third of all deaths in which heat played a role were attributable to human-induced global warming, according to a new article in Nature Climate Change.

Newswise: UCI-led study sheds light on mysterious genotype-phenotype associations
Released: 1-Jun-2021 1:45 PM EDT
UCI-led study sheds light on mysterious genotype-phenotype associations
University of California, Irvine

A new study analyzing the association between an individual’s genetics (genotype) and their observable characteristics resulting from the interaction of genetics and the environment (phenotype), contributes new knowledge to the understanding of human complex traits and diseases.

Released: 1-Jun-2021 1:20 PM EDT
Medical AI models rely on 'shortcuts' that could lead to misdiagnosis of COVID-19 and other diseases, UW researchers find
University of Washington

University of Washington researchers discovered that AI models ignored clinically significant indicators on X-rays and relied instead on characteristics such as text markers or patient positioning that were specific to each dataset to predict whether someone had COVID-19.


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