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Newswise:Video Embedded human-handling-stresses-young-monarch-butterflies2
VIDEO
Released: 15-Apr-2020 2:35 PM EDT
Human handling stresses young monarch butterflies
University of Georgia

Every year thousands of monarch butterflies are caught, tagged and released during their fall migration by citizen scientists helping to track their movements. But how do the monarchs themselves feel about being handled by humans?

Newswise: 227506_web.jpg
Released: 23-Mar-2020 2:55 PM EDT
Christmas Island discovery redraws map of life
University of Queensland

The world's animal distribution map will need to be redrawn and textbooks updated, after researchers discovered the existence of 'Australian' species on Christmas Island.

Newswise: 224671_web.jpg
Released: 25-Feb-2020 11:40 AM EST
Lava flows tell 600-year story of biodiversity loss on tropical island
British Ecological Society

A natural experiment created by an active volcano gives new insight into the long-term negative impacts of human colonisation of tropical forest islands. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society journal, Journal of Ecology.

Newswise: Last Year’s Extreme Snowfall Wiped Out Breeding of Arctic Animals and Plants
8-Oct-2019 9:45 AM EDT
Last Year’s Extreme Snowfall Wiped Out Breeding of Arctic Animals and Plants
PLOS

Climate change affects ecosystems not only through warming, but also by delivering more extreme weather events

23-Sep-2019 2:20 PM EDT
Scientists Connected Fragments of Pine Savanna and New Species Keep Showing Up
University of Wisconsin-Madison

By connecting small, restored patches of savanna to one another via habitat corridors at an experimental landscape within the Savannah River Site in South Carolina, a nearly 20-year-long study has shown an annual increase in the number of plant species within fragments over time, and a drop in the number of species disappearing from them entirely.

Newswise: Poo’s Clues: Moose Droppings Indicate Isle Royale Ecosystem Health
Released: 12-Aug-2019 4:20 PM EDT
Poo’s Clues: Moose Droppings Indicate Isle Royale Ecosystem Health
Michigan Technological University

Moose are picky eaters, and that’s a good thing for their ecosystems.

Newswise: The Ancestor of the Great White Shark
Released: 5-Jul-2019 4:05 AM EDT
The Ancestor of the Great White Shark
University of Vienna

Mackerel sharks (Lamniformes) are a group consisting of some of the most iconic sharks we know, including the mako shark (the fastest shark in the world), the infamous great white shark and Megalodon, the biggest predatory shark that has ever roamed  the world’s oceans.

Newswise: Mass Die-off of Puffins Recorded in the Bering Sea
23-May-2019 10:05 AM EDT
Mass Die-off of Puffins Recorded in the Bering Sea
PLOS

A mass die-off of seabirds in the Bering Sea may be partially attributable to climate change, according to a new study publishing May 29 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE

Newswise: Global Warming Hits Sea Creatures Hardest
Released: 24-Apr-2019 1:00 PM EDT
Global Warming Hits Sea Creatures Hardest
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Global warming has caused twice as many ocean-dwelling species as land-dwelling species to disappear from their habitats, a unique Rutgers-led study found. The greater vulnerability of sea creatures may significantly impact human communities that rely on fish and shellfish for food and economic activity, according to the study published in the journal Nature.

Newswise: Climate Change Could Devastate Painted Turtles, According to New Study
11-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Climate Change Could Devastate Painted Turtles, According to New Study
Iowa State University

Climate change could contribute to the demographic collapse of the painted turtle, a species that undergoes temperature-dependent sex determination. An Iowa State University scientist is sounding the alarm about the painted turtle’s future in a new study.

Newswise: Study Confirms Horseshoe Crabs Are Really Relatives of Spiders, Scorpions
Released: 8-Mar-2019 4:05 PM EST
Study Confirms Horseshoe Crabs Are Really Relatives of Spiders, Scorpions
University of Wisconsin-Madison

By analyzing troves of genetic data and considering a vast number of possible ways to examine it, University of Wisconsin–Madison scientists now have a high degree of confidence that horseshoe crabs do indeed belong within the arachnids.

Newswise:Video Embedded they-re-back-scientists-now-have-personal-diaries-of-blacktip-sharks
VIDEO
Released: 26-Feb-2019 9:00 AM EST
They’re Back! Scientists Now Have Personal ‘Diaries’ of Blacktip Sharks
Florida Atlantic University

Annual blacktip shark migration season is in full force along South Florida’s Atlantic coast as thousands of them head south for warmer weather. FAU shark researcher has been tracking the migration patterns of these top predators by air and by sea. Now, the latest addition to his arsenal of tools is providing personal and intimate details about them.

Newswise: Rutgers’ List of Campus Plants, Animals, Other Species May be First in World
Released: 19-Feb-2019 9:45 AM EST
Rutgers’ List of Campus Plants, Animals, Other Species May be First in World
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

American kestrel. Chinese mantis. Candleflame lichen. The highly diverse list of species spotted at Rutgers University may be unique globally. Indeed, more than 1,600 kinds of animals, insects, plants and other life forms have been reported so far at 24 Rutgers campuses and properties across New Jersey as part of a new long-term “Flora and Fauna of Rutgers University” biodiversity project.

Newswise: Red wolf DNA found in mysterious Texas canines
Released: 19-Dec-2018 3:25 PM EST
Red wolf DNA found in mysterious Texas canines
Princeton University

Though red wolves were declared extinct in the wild by 1980, a team of biologists has found their DNA in a group of canines living on Galveston Island off the coast of Texas.

Newswise: Study Finds Dinosaurs Battled Overheating with Nasal Air-Conditioning
Released: 19-Dec-2018 2:00 PM EST
Study Finds Dinosaurs Battled Overheating with Nasal Air-Conditioning
New York Institute of Technology

Researchers used 3D computer modeling to simulate heat exchange in dinosaurs

Newswise: Extinct Tuskless Walrus Fossil Discovered in Orange County
Released: 22-Oct-2018 10:30 AM EDT
Extinct Tuskless Walrus Fossil Discovered in Orange County
California State University, Fullerton

Cal State Fullerton (CSUF) paleontologists have described a new genus and species of walrus and named it after CSUF Titans and Orange County, where the extinct, tuskless fossil was discovered.

Newswise: Three Cheetah Cubs Born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
Released: 3-Oct-2018 4:05 PM EDT
Three Cheetah Cubs Born at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute
Smithsonian Institution

The Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) welcomed a litter of three cheetah cubs Sept. 22.

Newswise: Prince William Visits United for Wildlife Project 
At the College of African Wildlife Management, Mweka in Tanzania
Released: 2-Oct-2018 4:40 PM EDT
Prince William Visits United for Wildlife Project At the College of African Wildlife Management, Mweka in Tanzania
Wildlife Conservation Society

The Duke of Cambridge, Prince William visited Tanzania’s College of African Wildlife Management (CAWM), Mweka, as part of his current visit to Africa as President of United for Wildlife. While there, the Duke took part in an exercise as part of SMART training at the college being supported by United for Wildlife and implemented by the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS).

Newswise:Video Embedded caterpillar-‘road-rage’-could-affect-migration
VIDEO
Released: 9-May-2018 2:05 PM EDT
Caterpillar ‘Road Rage’ Could Affect Migration
University of Georgia

Monarch butterfly caterpillars living next to roads may be stressed by the sound of passing cars and trucks, according to a new study from the University of Georgia.

Newswise:Video Embedded massive-study-across-western-equatorial-africa-finds-more-gorillas-and-chimpanzees-than-expected,-but-80-are-outside-the-safe-havens-of-protected-areas
VIDEO
25-Apr-2018 2:05 PM EDT
Massive Study Across Western Equatorial Africa Finds More Gorillas and Chimpanzees Than Expected, but 80% Are Outside the Safe Havens of Protected Areas
Wildlife Conservation Society

A massive decade-long study of Western Equatorial Africa’s gorillas and chimpanzees has revealed that there are one third more western lowland gorillas and one tenth more central chimpanzees than previously thought. The bad news: the vast majority of these great apes (80 percent) exist outside of protected areas, and gorilla populations are declining by 2.7 percent annually.

Newswise: Malaria Parasite Makes Fawns of White-Tailed Deer Susceptible to Diseases and Death
Released: 18-Apr-2018 3:45 PM EDT
Malaria Parasite Makes Fawns of White-Tailed Deer Susceptible to Diseases and Death
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

More than one in five fawns of white-tailed deer – the most economically important big-game mammal in the United States – can contract a malaria parasite, making fawns susceptible to diseases and death, a new study co-authored by a University of Florida researcher shows.

Newswise: Simple Rules Can Help Fishery Managers Cope with Ecological Complexity
Released: 8-Feb-2018 4:30 PM EST
Simple Rules Can Help Fishery Managers Cope with Ecological Complexity
University of Washington

A team of ecologists and economists is the first to test whether real-life ecological interactions produce economic benefits for the fishing industry. The results were published online Jan. 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Newswise: Rescued Raptors a Reminder Household Toxins Still Threaten Beloved Birds
Released: 1-Feb-2018 3:30 PM EST
Rescued Raptors a Reminder Household Toxins Still Threaten Beloved Birds
Cornell University

Two local raptors made unexpected recoveries this month following exposure to common and deadly man-made toxins: lead and rodenticide.

Newswise: Climate Engineering, Once Started, Would Have Severe Impacts if Stopped
18-Jan-2018 11:00 AM EST
Climate Engineering, Once Started, Would Have Severe Impacts if Stopped
Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Facing a climate crisis, we may someday spray sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the Earth, but suddenly stopping the spraying would have a severe global impact on animals and plants, according to the first study on the potential biological impacts of geoengineering, or climate intervention.

Newswise: Pesticides and Poor Nutrition Damage Animal Health
19-Dec-2017 1:30 PM EST
Pesticides and Poor Nutrition Damage Animal Health
University of California San Diego

The combined effects of pesticides and a lack of nutrition form a deadly one-two punch for animals, new research shows for the first time. Researchers studied how honey bees fared with exposure to pesticides and limited nutrient sources, scenarios found in agricultural areas.

Newswise: Study Highlights Conservation Needs of Fish Species Recently Discovered in Southwest Virginia
Released: 2-Oct-2017 10:05 AM EDT
Study Highlights Conservation Needs of Fish Species Recently Discovered in Southwest Virginia
Virginia Tech

Currently, the Clinch dace is in the highest tier of the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ Tiers of Imperilment for all wildlife species found in the state. According to Mike Pinder, an aquatic biologist with the agency, that means that conservation efforts are vital.

Newswise:Video Embedded snails-bred-in-lab-help-species-crawl-back-from-brink-of-extinction
VIDEO
Released: 25-Sep-2017 2:05 PM EDT
Snails Bred in Lab Help Species Crawl Back from Brink of Extinction
SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Work to restore the endangered Chittenango ovate amber snail, found only in one location inside a Central New York state park, continued this month with the release of tagged adult snails raised in a laboratory at the College of Environmental Science and Forestry.

Newswise: Study Shows Fungal Infections Reduce Frogs’ Tolerance of Heat
Released: 31-Aug-2017 1:05 PM EDT
Study Shows Fungal Infections Reduce Frogs’ Tolerance of Heat
University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences

Fungal diseases are increasing in animals, which might have serious consequences for wildlife living in a hotter world, said a University of Florida scientist. A new study published in the international journal Scientific Reports shows that fungal infections reduced the heat tolerance of frogs by up to 4 degrees Celsius.

Newswise: New 13 Million-Year-Old Infant Skull Sheds Light on Ape Ancestry
7-Aug-2017 1:00 PM EDT
New 13 Million-Year-Old Infant Skull Sheds Light on Ape Ancestry
Stony Brook University

The discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. The find, announced in the scientific journal Nature on August 10th, belongs to an infant that lived about 13 million years ago. The research was done by an international team led by Isaiah Nengo of the​ Stony Brook University-affiliated ​Turkana Basin Institute, Stony Brook University, and De Anza College, U.S.A.

Newswise: Ancient Fossils Suggest Whales Used Teeth to Filter Out Prey
Released: 29-Jun-2017 12:05 PM EDT
Ancient Fossils Suggest Whales Used Teeth to Filter Out Prey
New York Institute of Technology

How baleen whales became filter feeders is widely debated among scientists—but now anatomy researchers at NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine may finally solve this mystery.

Newswise:Video Embedded ancient-otter-tooth-found-in-mexico-suggests-mammals-migrated-across-america
VIDEO
13-Jun-2017 9:00 AM EDT
Ancient Otter Tooth Found in Mexico Suggests Mammals Migrated Across America
University at Buffalo

An ancient otter tooth recently discovered in Mexico suggests certain mammals migrated across America during the Miocene geologic epoch, roughly 23 million to 5.3 million years ago. The new hypothesized route questions other theories such as migrations above Canada and through Panama, and has implications for a much larger biologic event — the Great American Biotic Interchange, when land bridges were formed and animals dispersed to and from North America and South America.

Newswise: Climate Change Refuge for Corals Discovered (and How We Can Protect It Right Now)
Released: 17-May-2017 11:05 AM EDT
Climate Change Refuge for Corals Discovered (and How We Can Protect It Right Now)
Wildlife Conservation Society

WCS scientists have discovered a refuge for corals where the environment protects otherwise sensitive species to the increasing severity of climate change.

Newswise: Experts Plan Conservation Roadmap for Shark and Ray Hotspot
Released: 19-Apr-2017 10:05 AM EDT
Experts Plan Conservation Roadmap for Shark and Ray Hotspot
Wildlife Conservation Society

Marine experts and conservationists have produced a status report and roadmap for protecting sharks and rays in the southwest Indian Ocean, one of the last remaining strongholds for these ancient creatures in the world’s oceans.

Newswise: New Many-Toothed Clingfish Discovered with Help of Digital Scans
Released: 17-Apr-2017 3:35 PM EDT
New Many-Toothed Clingfish Discovered with Help of Digital Scans
University of Washington

A set of curious researchers, state-of-the-art visual technology and a bit of good luck helped find a new fish whose tooth collection could put a shark to shame.

Newswise:Video Embedded pulling-together-to-rescue-11-asian-elephants
VIDEO
Released: 28-Mar-2017 11:05 AM EDT
Pulling Together to Rescue 11 Asian Elephants
Wildlife Conservation Society

The rescue of 11 Asian Elephants (Elephas maximus) from a mud hole inside the Keo Seima Wildlife Sanctuary, Mondulkiri Province, Cambodia, on 24th March 2017 avoided a tragedy for wildlife conservation in Cambodia.

Newswise: Big Bat Find in Alberta’s Boreal Forest
Released: 16-Mar-2017 1:05 PM EDT
Big Bat Find in Alberta’s Boreal Forest
Wildlife Conservation Society

The Wildlife Conservation Society Canada and Alberta Environment and Parks announced today the discovery last month of the largest Alberta bat hibernation site (based on estimated bat count) ever recorded outside of the Rocky Mountains.

Newswise: Government of Myanmar Unveils New Plan To Protect Marine Wildlife and Resources
Released: 23-Feb-2017 5:00 PM EST
Government of Myanmar Unveils New Plan To Protect Marine Wildlife and Resources
Wildlife Conservation Society

The Government of Myanmar and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) announced today a comprehensive plan to protect the country’s diverse fisheries and marine life—including dolphins, sea turtles, and other species—and other marine resources.

Newswise: Feeding Wild Dolphins Can Hurt Them, New Study Says
Released: 13-Feb-2017 9:05 AM EST
Feeding Wild Dolphins Can Hurt Them, New Study Says
Mote Marine Laboratory

Wild dolphins are more likely to be injured if humans feed them — even through unintentional means like discarding bait — reports a new study based in Sarasota Bay, Florida, and published recently in the peer-reviewed journal Royal Society Open Science.

Newswise:Video Embedded andean-bear-survey-in-peru-finds-humans-not-the-only-visitors-to-machu-picchu
VIDEO
Released: 26-Jan-2017 3:05 PM EST
Andean Bear Survey in Peru Finds Humans Not the Only Visitors to Machu Picchu
Wildlife Conservation Society

A recent wildlife survey led by SERNANP (Servicio Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas por el Estado) and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) in the Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu in Peru has confirmed that the world-famous site is also home to a biologically important and iconic species: the Andean bear (Tremarctos ornatus).

Newswise: Predator or Not? Invasive Snails Hide Even When They Don't Know
Released: 24-Jan-2017 12:05 PM EST
Predator or Not? Invasive Snails Hide Even When They Don't Know
University of Washington

The specific cues that trigger an animal’s natural defense vary depending on the species and its history in the ecosystem, a new University of Washington study finds.

Newswise: Little Tortoise, Big Range
Released: 24-Jan-2017 10:05 AM EST
Little Tortoise, Big Range
Wildlife Conservation Society

WCS scientists have discovered the impressed tortoise (Manouria impressa) in the Hukaung Valley Wildlife Sanctuary in northern Myanmar, some 528 miles from its known range in that country.

Newswise: BREAKING SCIENCE NEWS: Wildlife-Snaring Crisis in Asian Forests
Released: 23-Jan-2017 3:05 PM EST
BREAKING SCIENCE NEWS: Wildlife-Snaring Crisis in Asian Forests
Wildlife Conservation Society

A very important article (link) co-authored by WCS scientist Tony Lynam has been published in this week’s Science about a crisis emerging in Asia from snaring, which is wiping out wildlife in unprecedented numbers.

Newswise: Exeter Research Helps Protect Loggerhead Turtles
Released: 13-Jan-2017 11:25 AM EST
Exeter Research Helps Protect Loggerhead Turtles
University of Exeter

A long-running research and conservation project is helping save an at-risk species of turtle.

Newswise: WCS Spearheads Conservation Science For U.S. Jaguar Recovery Plan
Released: 19-Dec-2016 4:55 PM EST
WCS Spearheads Conservation Science For U.S. Jaguar Recovery Plan
Wildlife Conservation Society

A recovery plan for the Western Hemisphere’s largest cat species along the U.S.-Mexico border was released today by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). WCS played a critical role in informing the position of USFWS on jaguar conservation by providing the best available science and research to guide and support the plan.

Newswise: Each Animal Species Hosts a Unique Microbial Community and Benefits From It
28-Nov-2016 4:05 PM EST
Each Animal Species Hosts a Unique Microbial Community and Benefits From It
Vanderbilt University

A laboratory study of four animal species and their microbiota finds that each species hosts a unique community of microbes that can significantly improve its health and fitness.


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