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Embargo will expire:
24-Jan-2019 5:00 PM EST
Released to reporters:
18-Jan-2019 9:00 AM EST

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  • Embargo expired:
    17-Jan-2019 5:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706340

Gene Sequencing Approach May Help Tailor Treatments for Young Kidney Transplant Recipients

American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

• Whole-exome sequencing of blood or saliva revealed a genetic diagnosis of kidney disease in 32.7% of pediatric kidney transplant recipients. • The findings indicate that such a sequencing strategy may help individualize pre- and post-transplant care for many young kidney transplant recipients.

Released:
11-Jan-2019 9:25 AM EST

Article ID: 706706

Loyola Medicine to Offer Fellowship in Liver and Kidney Transplant Surgery

Loyola University Health System

The American Society of Transplant Surgeons (ASTS) has accredited Loyola Medicine to offer a prestigious two-year fellowship in liver and kidney transplant surgery. The first fellow will begin in July, 2020.

Released:
17-Jan-2019 4:05 PM EST

Article ID: 706621

Soft Drinks + Hard Work + Hot Weather = Possible Kidney Disease Risk

American Physiological Society (APS)

New research suggests that drinking sugary, caffeinated soft drinks while exercising in hot weather may increase the risk of kidney disease. The study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

Released:
17-Jan-2019 7:00 AM EST

Article ID: 706614

New AI can detect urinary tract infections

University of Surrey

New AI developed at the University of Surrey could identify and help reduce one of the top causes of hospitalisation for people living with dementia: urinary tract infections (UTI).

Released:
16-Jan-2019 2:50 PM EST

Article ID: 706480

Moffitt Cancer Center Hires New Vice Chair of the Department of Genitourinary Oncology

Moffitt Cancer Center

Manish Kohli, M.D., has joined Moffitt Cancer Center as the vice chair of the Department of Genitourinary Oncology. He also has an extensive research background, focusing on creating new ways to bring individualized care to patients.

Released:
15-Jan-2019 9:35 AM EST
VanderbiltTransplantCenterImage1.jpg

Article ID: 706415

Vanderbilt Set New Heart, Overall Transplant Record in 2018

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) set a new record for total transplants among its five organ specialties in 2018 with more than 500 transplants.

Released:
14-Jan-2019 11:05 AM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jan-2019 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 706022

Viral production is not essential for deaths caused by food-borne pathogen

PLOS

The replication of a bacterial virus is not necessary to cause lethal disease in a mouse model of a food-borne pathogen called Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), according to a study published January 10 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Sowmya Balasubramanian, John Leong and Marcia Osburne of Tufts University School of Medicine, and colleagues. The surprising findings could lead to the development of novel strategies for the treatment of EHEC and life-threatening kidney-related complications in children.

Released:
4-Jan-2019 12:30 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jan-2019 11:00 AM EST

Article ID: 706239

The Pressure’s Off

Harvard Medical School

• Scientists reveal activated structure of a receptor critical for blood pressure, salt homeostasis • Receptor is a target for drugs widely used to treat hypertension

Released:
9-Jan-2019 3:30 PM EST

Article ID: 706219

Sex Differences in ‘Body Clock’ May Benefit Women’s Heart Health

American Physiological Society (APS)

Research suggests that a gene that governs the body’s biological (circadian) clock acts differently in males versus females and may protect females from heart disease. The study is the first to analyze circadian blood pressure rhythms in female mice. The research, published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, was chosen as an APSselect article for January.

Released:
10-Jan-2019 7:00 AM EST

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