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Evolution and Darwin

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Article ID: 711775

What can we learn from promiscuous bugs and crocodile studs?

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB)

You may think human sex is bizarre enough. But elsewhere in the animal kingdom, features like competition between sperm and semen that influences behavior conspire to make it even weirder. A special issue of the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics highlights recent discoveries in the reproductive biology of species from insects to crocodiles. Here are some highlights.

Released:
23-Apr-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 711733

The Kids Are Alright

Washington University in St. Louis

A new study reveals the surprising way that family quarrels in seeds drive rapid evolution. Researchers in Arts & Sciences discovered that conflict over the amount of resources an offspring receives from its parent seems to play a special role in the development of certain seed tissues. The study is published the week of April 22 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released:
22-Apr-2019 3:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711571

Fossils found in museum drawer in Kenya belong to gigantic carnivore

Ohio University

Paleontologists at Ohio University have discovered a new species of meat-eating mammal larger than any big cat stalking the world today. Larger than a polar bear,

Released:
18-Apr-2019 12:05 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    17-Apr-2019 1:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 711390

Fish that outlived dinosaurs reveals secrets of ancient skull evolution

Flinders University

A new study into one of the world’s oldest types of fish, Coelacanth, provides fresh insights into the development of the skull and brain of vertebrates and the evolution of lobe-finned fishes and land animals, as published in Nature.

Released:
16-Apr-2019 12:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 711440

Honey, I ate the kids: The sweet side of filial cannibalism

Frontiers

As you bite into a chocolate bunny or egg this weekend, consider this: rabbits often eat their own young, and hens their own eggs.

Released:
16-Apr-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 711334

Could climate change cause infertility?

University of Lincoln

The scientific community has long held an understanding about the effect of temperature on sperm production in mammals, but this new study sheds light on how spermatogenesis in insects is hampered at extreme temperatures.

Released:
15-Apr-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711105

Long-lived bats could hold secrets to mammal longevity

University of Maryland, College Park

University of Maryland researchers analyzed an evolutionary tree reconstructed from the DNA of a majority of known bat species and found four bat lineages that exhibit extreme longevity. They also identified, for the first time, two life history features that predict extended life spans in bats.

Released:
10-Apr-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 711104

Evolution from water to land led to better parenting

University of Bath

The evolution of aquatic creatures to start living on land made them into more attentive parents, says new research on frogs led by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

Released:
10-Apr-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 710915

Evolutionary Biologist Receives Award to Study the Regenerative Powers of the Shrew

Stony Brook University

Stony Brook University's Liliana Dávalos, PhD, is studying the phenomenal capabilities of the shrew, which shrinks up to 20 percent during winter months without hibernating. The research may shed light on the processes of neurological degeneration and regeneration in mammals.

Released:
8-Apr-2019 11:05 AM EDT

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