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Newswise: Stony Brook Ecologist Wins Award Heralding the Nation’s Most Promising Young Scientists

Article ID: 715021

Stony Brook Ecologist Wins Award Heralding the Nation’s Most Promising Young Scientists

Stony Brook University

Heather Lynch, PhD, of Stony Brook University, has been named a winner of the Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists in the category of Life Sciences. The award includes a $250,000 unrestricted scientific prize.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 4:15 PM EDT

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Evolution and Darwin, Nature

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Newswise: A new normal: Study explains universal pattern in fossil record
  • Embargo expired:
    26-Jun-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 714616

A new normal: Study explains universal pattern in fossil record

Santa Fe Institute

Instead of the typical bell-shaped curve, the fossil record shows a fat-tailed distribution, with extreme, outlier, events occurring with higher-than-expected probability. Using the same mathematical tools that describe stock market crashes, Santa Fe Institute scientists explain the evolutionary dynamics that give rise to universal patterns in the fossil record.

Released:
23-Jun-2019 9:05 PM EDT
Newswise: 204728_web.jpg

Article ID: 714991

Unlocking secrets of the ice worm

Washington State University

The ice worm is one of the largest organisms that spends its entire life in ice and Washington State University scientist Scot Hotalilng is one of the only people on the planet studying it.

Released:
26-Jun-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 714802

Screams contain a 'calling card' for the vocalizer's identity

Emory Health Sciences

Human screams convey a level of individual identity that may help explain their evolutionary origins, finds a study by scientists at Emory University.

Released:
24-Jun-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: The complex fate of Antarctic species in the face of a changing climate

Article ID: 714480

The complex fate of Antarctic species in the face of a changing climate

University of Plymouth

Oxygen concentrations in both the open ocean and coastal waters have declined by 2-5% since at least the middle of the 20th century.

Released:
17-Jun-2019 3:05 PM EDT
Newswise: New ‘king’ of fossils discovered in Australia

Article ID: 714325

New ‘king’ of fossils discovered in Australia

University of Adelaide

Fossils of a giant new species from the long-extinct group of sea creatures called trilobites have been found on Kangaroo Island, South Australia. The finding is adding important insights to our knowledge of the Cambrian ‘explosion’, the greatest diversification event in the history of life on Earth.

Released:
13-Jun-2019 2:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 714277

Why Noah’s Ark Won’t Work

University of Vermont

A first-of-its-kind study illuminates which marine species may have the ability to survive in a world where temperatures are rising and oceans are becoming acidic.

Released:
12-Jun-2019 10:30 AM EDT

Article ID: 714199

Sex, lice and videotape

University of Utah

University of Utah biologists demonstrated real-time adaptation in their lab that triggered reproductive isolation in just four years. They began with a single population of parasitic feather lice, split the population in two and transferred them onto different-sized hosts—pigeons with small feathers, and pigeons with large feathers. The pigeons preened at the lice and populations adapted quickly by evolving differences in body size. When paired together, males and females that were too different or too similar in size laid zero eggs.

Released:
10-Jun-2019 6:20 PM EDT
Newswise: New Research Shakes Up the Sloth Family Tree
  • Embargo expired:
    6-Jun-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713953

New Research Shakes Up the Sloth Family Tree

McMaster University

New research on the evolutionary relationships between tree sloths and their extinct giant relatives is challenging decades of widely accepted scientific research.

Released:
5-Jun-2019 11:25 AM EDT
Newswise: Researchers Discover What Makes Deep-Sea Dragonfish Teeth Transparent
  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jun-2019 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 713948

Researchers Discover What Makes Deep-Sea Dragonfish Teeth Transparent

University of California San Diego

A team of researchers led by the University of California San Diego have discovered what’s responsible for making the teeth of the deep-sea dragonfish transparent. This unique adaptation, which helps camouflage the dragonfish from their prey, results from their teeth having an unusually crystalline nanostructure mixed with amorphous regions. The findings could provide “bioinspiration” for researchers looking to develop transparent ceramics.

Released:
4-Jun-2019 5:00 PM EDT

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