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Article ID: 710083

Ancient birds out of the egg running

University of Hong Kong

The ~125 million-year-old Early Cretaceous fossil beds of Los Hoyas, Spain have long been known for producing thousands of petrified fish and reptiles (Fig. 1). However, one special fossil stands unique and is one of the rarest of fossils -- a nearly complete skeleton of a hatchling bird.

Released:
22-Mar-2019 11:05 AM EDT
Embargo will expire:
25-Mar-2019 12:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
21-Mar-2019 9:00 AM EDT

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Embargo will expire:
27-Mar-2019 2:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
20-Mar-2019 3:30 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 27-Mar-2019 2:00 PM EDT

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Article ID: 709880

Nature hits rewind

McMaster University

The study of evolution is revealing new complexities, showing how the traits most beneficial to the fitness of individual plants and animals are not always the ones we see in nature. Instead, new research by McMaster behavioural scientists shows that in certain cases evolution works in the opposite direction, reversing individual improvements to benefit related members of the same group.

Released:
19-Mar-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709882

How hot spots of genetic variation evolved in human DNA

University at Buffalo

New research investigates hot spots of genetic variation in the human genome, examining the sections of our DNA that are most likely to differ significantly from one person to another.

Released:
19-Mar-2019 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709529

Fossil Teeth from Kenya Solve Ancient Monkey Mystery

University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin)

The teeth of a new fossil monkey, unearthed in the badlands of northwest Kenya, help fill a 6-million-year void in Old World monkey evolution, according to a study by U.S. and Kenyan scientists published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Released:
12-Mar-2019 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709502

Ancient records prompt rethink of animal evolution timeline

University of Edinburgh

Scientists are rethinking a major milestone in animal evolution, after gaining fresh insights into how life on Earth diversified millions of years ago.

Released:
12-Mar-2019 12:00 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    12-Mar-2019 8:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 709436

Fingertip Sized Frog Discovered in Remote Rainforest of Southern India

George Washington University

An expedition to an isolated hill range located in Southern India along one of the top biodiversity hotspots in the world led to the discovery of a new, ancient lineage of frog endemic to the area, according to a study published today in the journal PeerJ.

Released:
11-Mar-2019 4:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 709452

When coyote parents get used to humans, their offspring become bolder, too

University of Washington

When coyote parents are habituated to humans, their offspring are more habituated, too — potentially leading to negative interactions between coyotes and humans.

Released:
11-Mar-2019 5:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    11-Mar-2019 3:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 709232

Short Birth Intervals Associated with Higher Offspring Mortality in Primates New Study Finds

New York University

Shorter intervals between primate births are associated with higher mortality rates in offspring, finds a new study of macaque monkeys. The results are consistent with previous research on human birth intervals, suggesting that this is a pattern of evolutionary origin.

Released:
6-Mar-2019 3:50 PM EST

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