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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Nov-2018 6:00 AM EST

Article ID: 703916

Venom Shape Untangles Scorpion Family Tree

University of Wisconsin-Madison

University of Wisconsin–Madison scientists have made a fresh attempt to untangle the scorpion family tree using not the shape and structure of the arachnids’ bodies, but the shape of their venom.

Released:
13-Nov-2018 1:15 PM EST

Article ID: 703915

When Boy Fish Build Castles to Impress Girls, Boy Genes ‘Turn On’ and ‘Tune In’

Georgia Institute of Technology

What if we could observe genes firing off signals to cause some behaviors? We're getting closer. Researchers were able to directly match gene regulation with ritual mating behavior in fish. Their research field may also give some insight into autism spectrum disorder.

Released:
13-Nov-2018 4:20 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    8-Nov-2018 2:00 PM EST

Article ID: 703488

Replaying the Tape of Life: Is It Possible?

Washington University in St. Louis

A review published in the Nov. 9 issue of Science explores the complexity of evolution’s predictability in extraordinary detail. In it, researchers at Kenyon College, Michigan State University and Washington University in St. Louis closely examine evidence from a number of empirical studies of evolutionary repeatability and contingency in an effort to fully interrogate ideas about contingency’s role in evolution.

Released:
6-Nov-2018 4:00 PM EST

Article ID: 703541

Goldilocks and the optimal mating distance: Neither too small nor too large but just right

University of Michigan

Evolutionary theory predicts that the fitness of an individual is maximized when the genetic differences between its parents are neither too small nor too large but some ideal amount known as the optimal mating distance.

Released:
7-Nov-2018 2:00 PM EST
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Article ID: 703479

Updated book compiles 45 years of changes in Pacific Northwest flora

University of Washington

Botanists at the University of Washington’s Burke Museum of Natural History & Culture have created a much-needed second edition of the “Flora of the Pacific Northwest.”

Released:
6-Nov-2018 1:05 PM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    29-Oct-2018 3:05 PM EDT

Article ID: 702750

Synthetic Microorganisms Allow Scientists to Study Ancient Evolutionary Mysteries in the Laboratory

Scripps Research Institute

Scientists at Scripps Research and their collaborators have created microorganisms that may recapitulate key features of organisms thought to have lived billions of years ago, allowing them to explore questions about how life evolved.

Released:
24-Oct-2018 3:05 PM EDT
  • Embargo expired:
    25-Oct-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 702417

A Single Genetic Switch Changes Butterfly Wing Color

University of Chicago Medical Center

New research by scientists from the University of Chicago shows that just one gene controls whether a certain species of butterfly has white or yellow spots on its wings.

Released:
18-Oct-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 702554

Extinct Tuskless Walrus Fossil Discovered in Orange County

California State University, Fullerton

Cal State Fullerton (CSUF) paleontologists have described a new genus and species of walrus and named it after CSUF Titans and Orange County, where the extinct, tuskless fossil was discovered.

Released:
22-Oct-2018 10:30 AM EDT
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Article ID: 701872

Scientists go ‘Back to the Future’ and Create Flies with Ancient Genes to Study the Evolution of Embryonic Development

New York University

Scientists at New York University and the University of Chicago have created fruit flies carrying reconstructed ancient genes to reveal how ancient mutations drove major evolutionary changes in embryonic development—the impact of which we see today.

Released:
9-Oct-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 701865

Reimagining Evolution Education: Free, Multimedia High School Curriculum Brings New Life to Old Concepts

University of Utah Health

Gone are the days of heavy science textbooks with over-used examples and hard-to-grasp lessons. The Genetic Science Learning Center (GSLC) at the University of Utah is bringing science education into the 21st century with an online, interactive and multimedia curriculum that teaches up-to-date concepts in evolution and genetics to high school students.

Released:
9-Oct-2018 1:05 AM EDT

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