Feature Channels:

Archaeology and Anthropology

Add to Favorites Subscribe Share
Newswise: africa-dna-dig-960.jpg

Nature Study: First Ancient DNA from West Africa Illuminates the Deep Human Past

Saint Louis University

The research team sequenced DNA from four children buried 8,000 and 3,000 years ago at Shum Laka in Cameroon, a site excavated by a Belgian and Cameroonian team 30 years ago. The findings, “Ancient West African foragers in the context of African population history," published Jan. 22 in Nature, represent the first ancient DNA from West or Central Africa, and some of the oldest DNA recovered from an African tropical context.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, African News, Nature (journal),

Released:
22-Jan-2020 2:20 PM EST
Newswise: Late Neolithic Italy Was Home to Complex Networks of Metal Exchange
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Late Neolithic Italy Was Home to Complex Networks of Metal Exchange

PLOS

Analysis reveals where prehistoric Italian communities got their copper, from Tuscany and beyond

Channels: Archaeology and Anthropology, History, PLOS ONE, All Journal News,

Released:
15-Jan-2020 4:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: First Ancient DNA from West and Central Africa Illuminates Deep Human Past
  • Embargo expired:
    22-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST

First Ancient DNA from West and Central Africa Illuminates Deep Human Past

Harvard Medical School

An international team led by Harvard Medical School scientists has produced the first genome-wide ancient human DNA sequences from west and central Africa.

Channels: Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Nature (journal), African News, Evolution and Darwin, Genetics, Staff Picks,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 1:00 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: Native Americans Did Not Make Large-Scale Changes to Environment Prior to European Contact
  • Embargo expired:
    20-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST

Native Americans Did Not Make Large-Scale Changes to Environment Prior to European Contact

Binghamton University, State University of New York

Contrary to long-held beliefs, humans did not make major changes to the landscape prior to European colonization, according to new research conducted in New England featuring faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. These new insights into the past could help to inform how landscapes are managed in the future.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, Environmental Science, Wildlife, Staff Picks, Nature,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 11:00 AM EST
Research Alert
Newswise: 221872_web.jpg

Human-caused biodiversity decline started millions of years ago

University of Gothenburg

The human-caused biodiversity decline started much earlier than researchers used to believe. According to a new study published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters the process was not started by our own species but by some of our ancestors.

Channels: Environmental Science, Nature, Paleontology, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Climate Science, Wildlife, Staff Picks, All Journal News,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 1:20 PM EST
Research Results
wau-logo.gif

Green in tooth and claw

Washington University in St. Louis

Hard plant foods may have made up a larger part of early human ancestors’ diet than currently presumed, according to a new experimental study of modern tooth enamel from Washington University in St. Louis. The results have implications for reconstructing diet, and potentially for our interpretation of the fossil record of human evolution, researchers said.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, Oral Health, Scientific Reports,

Released:
17-Jan-2020 5:00 AM EST
Research Results
Newswise: xsi9yIwWA-9P0HdEl-h5dRqsI7b9n95JTATy8XIUZ8z6QZ0VX_plfoBZh5jHgV0jSLitL3mhGlNnAmZffBI3T4yJnEi7FzjGi9iawU9VeEAeNpQgw4C4hNRz-enMOYVzzQrwjmU1mcJh_OYl0Aw7jSBXecC9pLYor7Ig30i7mT2ZTl-tgeqDe5iOjl2q_vQHmRZGqiaJR2c7xhJiTVM=s0-
  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2020 2:00 PM EST

Neandertals Went Underwater for Their Tools

PLOS

Neandertals collected clam shells and volcanic rock from the beach and coastal waters of Italy during the Middle Paleolithic, according to a study published January 15, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Paola Villa of the University of Colorado and colleagues.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Paleontology, Evolution and Darwin, PLOS ONE, Staff Picks,

Released:
9-Jan-2020 12:40 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: 221210_web.jpg

Study puts the 'Carib' in 'Caribbean,' boosting credibility of Columbus' cannibal claims

Florida Museum of Natural History

Christopher Columbus' accounts of the Caribbean include harrowing descriptions of fierce raiders who abducted women and cannibalized men - stories long dismissed as myths.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Staff Picks,

Released:
10-Jan-2020 11:30 AM EST
Research Results

Early humans revealed to have engineered optimized stone tools at Olduvai Gorge

University of Kent

Early Stone Age populations living between 1.8 - 1.2 million years ago engineered their stone tools in complex ways to make optimised cutting tools, according to a new study by University of Kent and UCL.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, Evolution and Darwin,

Released:
8-Jan-2020 12:05 PM EST
Research Results
Newswise: 220746_web.jpg

Over-Hunting Walruses Contributed to the Collapse of Norse Greenland, Study Suggests

University of Cambridge

The mysterious disappearance of Greenland's Norse colonies sometime in the 15th century may have been down to the overexploitation of walrus populations for their tusks, according to a study of medieval artefacts from across Europe.

Channels: All Journal News, Archaeology and Anthropology, History, Marine Science, Environmental Science, Paleontology, Wildlife, Staff Picks,

Released:
6-Jan-2020 2:05 PM EST
Research Results


6.25043