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Article ID: 715928

Pilot study assesses if diabetes medicine can help reduce stress-driven alcohol use

University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Researchers are investigating if a medication used to regulate blood sugar can alter motivation to use alcohol by targeting the brain’s stress response system.

Released:
17-Jul-2019 8:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 715724

Seeing greenery linked to less intense and frequent cravings

University of Plymouth

Being able to see green spaces from your home is associated with reduced cravings for alcohol, cigarettes and harmful foods, new research has shown.

Released:
12-Jul-2019 12:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jul-2019 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 715424

Study participation cuts alcohol use and boosts viral suppression in female drinkers with HIV

Research Society on Alcoholism

Women living with HIV are less likely than men to achieve viral suppression with antiretroviral therapy. Reduction in alcohol use is a possible strategy to improve health outcomes in women with HIV, with evidence that unhealthy alcohol use (>7 drinks per week or >4 drinks per occasion for women) is associated with poorer adherence to treatment, lower rates of viral suppression, and faster disease progression. Several medications are available on prescription to help reduce drinking, including naltrexone, which is taken as a once-daily pill; however, none have been studied in relation to clinical outcomes in people with HIV. Researchers from universities in Florida have conducted a clinical trial, published in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research , to understand the effect of naltrexone on drinking behavior and clinical outcomes in women with HIV who engage in unhealthy alcohol use, exceeding recommended drinking levels.

Released:
8-Jul-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    10-Jul-2019 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 715427

“Can’t wait to blackout tonight”: Tweeted Intentions and Motives for Blackout Drinking

Research Society on Alcoholism

Drinking too much too quickly can cause alcohol-induced blackout – where the individual stays conscious but cannot later remember what happened. Blackout drinking can lead to accidents and risky behaviors, and may have long-term effects on brain function. Despite the risks, drinking to blackout is common, particularly among young adults ─with evidence that some young people drink with the specific intention of blacking out. However, the motives underlying this drinking behavior are unknown. A new report in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Researchexamines how blackouts are discussed on Twitter, with a focus on people’s intentions and motives for blacking out.

Released:
8-Jul-2019 2:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    5-Jul-2019 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 715296

Full circle ─ rigorous study links moderate drinking in older age with lower risk of death ─ but more research still needed

Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcohol consumption in later life has increased over the past decade. Although moderate alcohol intake in older adults has been previously linked to a lower risk of cardiovascular disease and death, recent studies have suggested little ─ if any ─ health benefit to alcohol. Assessing the relationship between alcohol intake and mortality is extremely challenging, partly because of the need to disentangle the effect of alcohol from that of other factors that influence health, and also because people’s drinking habits often change over time. However, research methodology and data quality continue to improve. A new report in the journal Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research presents a 16-year follow-up of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) ─ one of the largest and most rigorous US studies of the relationship between alcohol consumption and mortality to date.

Released:
2-Jul-2019 5:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Benzodiazepine Use with Opioids Intensifies Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Article ID: 715179

Benzodiazepine Use with Opioids Intensifies Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

Babies born after being exposed to both opioids and benzodiazepines before birth are more likely to have severe drug withdrawal, requiring medications like morphine for treatment, compared to infants exposed to opioids alone, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Hospital Pediatrics.

Released:
1-Jul-2019 10:05 AM EDT

Article ID: 715116

Toxic substances found in the glass and decoration of alcoholic beverage bottles

University of Plymouth

Bottles of beer, wine and spirits contain potentially harmful levels of toxic elements, such as lead and cadmium, in their enamelled decorations, a new study shows.

Released:
28-Jun-2019 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714661

Early adversity in life may lead to stress-related drinking during adulthood

Research Society on Alcoholism

Many factors influence alcohol consumption during adulthood. Individuals who experience early adversity (EA) in their lives tend to be more vulnerable to stress-related drinking or other stress-related addiction. This vulnerability can be exacerbated by an existing genetic predisposition. These findings and others will be shared at the 42nd annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in Minneapolis June 22-26.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 7:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Jun-2019 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714662

Love and alcohol: Romantic relationships can influence genetic predispositions for alcohol problems

Research Society on Alcoholism

How do the people we love shape our drinking? Researchers know that both genetic and environmental factors – the latter including relationships with other people – influence alcohol outcomes such as abuse or dependence. Interdisciplinary research indicates that romantic relationships can even alter the impact of genetic influences on alcohol outcomes. These results and others will be shared at the 42nd annual scientific meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism (RSA) in Minneapolis June 22-26.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 7:05 PM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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  • Embargo expired:
    26-Jun-2019 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 714835

Heart Risk Raised By Sitting in Front of the TV, Not By Sitting at Work, Finds Study

Columbia University Irving Medical Center

Sitting while watching television, but not sitting at work, is associated with a greater risk of heart attack, stroke, or early death, Columbia researchers have found.

Released:
24-Jun-2019 2:05 PM EDT

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