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  • Embargo expired:
    25-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694950

Alcohol, Anger and Aggression: An Unhappy Combination

Research Society on Alcoholism

Researchers asked 60 adult participants (31 men, 29 women) – recruited through newspaper advertisements – to record their daily social interactions for 20 days. Specifically, for each interaction, participants reported their perception of their interacting partner’s quarrelsome behavior, their own anger and quarrelsome behavior, and the number of alcoholic drinks consumed up to three hours prior to the event.

Released:
22-May-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 694984

Social Media Usage Linked to Underage Drinking

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Penn Medicine researchers found a statistically significant relationship between teen and young adult alcohol related social media engagement and both alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems.

Released:
23-May-2018 8:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    22-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694795

Facebook and Twitter Postings May Indicate a Drinking Problem

Research Society on Alcoholism

Despite the pervasive use of social media by young adults, little is known about whether, and how, social-media engagement influences their drinking patterns and risk of alcohol-related problems. Reviews thus far have looked at drinking relative to risky behaviors and advertising. This review examined associations between young adults’ alcohol-related social-media activity – defined as posting, liking, commenting on, and viewing of alcohol-related content on social media – and their drinking behaviors and alcohol-related problems.

Released:
18-May-2018 5:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 694582

Predicting What Drives People to Seek, Stay in Substance-Use Treatment

Florida Atlantic University

About 22 million Americans are substance dependent, yet only 2.5 million seek treatment. Reviewing 5,443 records of adult substance use treatment clients, a new study examined treatment readiness, or the characteristics that are likely to promote treatment engagement, to predict who seeks and stays in treatment. Results show that white and black race, being male, lower levels of education, and being married or divorced (vs. never married) were all negatively related to substance-use treatment engagement.

Released:
16-May-2018 10:15 AM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

Article ID: 694649

Alcohol Use Before Lung Transplant Increases Time in Hospital and on Ventilator

Loyola University Health System

Lung transplant patients who showed evidence of alcohol use before their transplants spent more time in the hospital and on the ventilator, a Loyola University Chicago Study has found. Researchers said abstaining from alcohol prior to lung transplants could improve outcomes.

Released:
15-May-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694277

Motivational Interviewing More Effective Than Lectures

SUNY Buffalo State

Michael “Mick” MacLean, associate professor of psychology, who has done extensive research on adolescent alcohol and substance use. Most recently, he’s implemented a strategy for reaching teens who are experiencing substance-related problems but are not yet addicted. Instead of berating them, trying to scare them, or using other well-worn tactics, MacLean suggests “motivational interviewing,” which he said has a significantly higher success rate.

Released:
9-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Social and Behavioral Sciences

  • Embargo expired:
    9-May-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694106

Using the Internet to Reach Woman at Risk for Drinking During Pregnancy

Research Society on Alcoholism

Alcohol use during pregnancy can lead to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs), a range of effects that include lowered intelligence and developmental delays. Over 30 percent of the pregnancies in the United States are unplanned, with most women unaware of being pregnant until after the fourth week, and many not recognizing that they are pregnant until after that. However, the early weeks of pregnancy are critical for fetal development and susceptibility to the damaging effects of alcohol. While face-to-face interventions can significantly reduce risk for an alcohol-exposed pregnancy (AEP), this study, the Contraception and Alcohol Risk Reduction Internet Intervention (CARRII), examined an Internet-delivered intervention designed to reach more women at risk.

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5-May-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 694050

Study: Alcohol-Related Cirrhosis Patients are Sicker, Costlier and Often Female

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new review by Michigan Medicine finds that women drinkers are disproportionately affected in alcohol-related cirrhosis cases. Why — and what's next.

Released:
4-May-2018 8:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Apr-2018 10:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693257

Some Young-Adult Substance Use and Interpersonal-Relations Problems Linked to Parental Divorce and Alcohol Dependence

Research Society on Alcoholism

Previous research showed that the combination of two risk factors – parental separation/ divorce and family history of alcoholism (FH+) – can have negative effects on offspring, including an earlier onset of substance use among adolescents and young adults, lower educational attainment in adulthood, and a greater risk of alcohol dependence. This study looked at the impact of parental divorce and FH+ on offspring’s alcohol problems, marijuana use, and interpersonal relationships with parents.

Released:
20-Apr-2018 6:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693343

Looking Past Peer Influence: Genetic Contributions to Increases in Teen Substance Use?

Florida Atlantic University

Parents and adults spend a lot of time worrying about the influence of peers when it comes to teen substance use. Using a unique sample of 476 twin pairs who have been followed since birth, a new study examines if there is a genetic component that drives teens’ desire for risk taking and novelty.

Released:
25-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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