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Embargo will expire:
24-Jun-2019 3:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
19-Jun-2019 3:05 PM EDT

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Article ID: 714586

Scientists develop climate-ready wheat that can survive drought conditions

University of Sheffield

Wheat plants engineered to have fewer microscopic pores – called stomata – on their leaves are better able to survive drought conditions associated with climate breakdown, according to a new study.

Released:
19-Jun-2019 9:20 AM EDT
Newswise: Climate change will fuel more war, new study suggests

Article ID: 714435

Climate change will fuel more war, new study suggests

University of Colorado Boulder

Droughts, floods, natural disasters and other climatic shifts influenced between 3% and 20% of armed conflicts over the last century. By century’s end, one in four armed conflicts, including civil wars, will be a result of a changing climate.

Released:
17-Jun-2019 11:05 AM EDT

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Newswise: Striped Maple Trees Often Change Sexes, With Females More Likely to Die

Article ID: 712082

Striped Maple Trees Often Change Sexes, With Females More Likely to Die

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

Although pollen has covered cars for weeks and allergy sufferers have been sneezing, we think of sex as being the realm of animals. But plant sex can be quite interesting, especially in species that can have male or female flowers. In a study in the journal Annals of Botany, Rutgers University–New Brunswick researchers found that striped maple trees can change sex from year to year. A tree may be male one year and female the next, and while male trees grow more, female trees are more likely to die.

Released:
29-May-2019 6:00 AM EDT
Newswise: Human Influence on Global Droughts Dates Back 100 Years

Article ID: 712215

Human Influence on Global Droughts Dates Back 100 Years

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Observations and climate reconstructions using data from tree rings confirm that human activity was affecting the worldwide drought risk as far back as the early 20th century.

Released:
1-May-2019 1:05 PM EDT
Newswise: As the Arctic Warms, Temperate Regions Dry Out, with Likely Effects on Society
  • Embargo expired:
    27-Mar-2019 2:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 710233

As the Arctic Warms, Temperate Regions Dry Out, with Likely Effects on Society

Northern Arizona University

Northern Arizona University researchers used climate records dating back thousands of years to demonstrate that warming in the Arctic is associated with fewer storms and increased aridity in a huge swath of the Northern Hemisphere, which could lead to dramatic effects on agriculture and population centers throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia.

Released:
26-Mar-2019 12:05 PM EDT
Newswise: Julian Schroeder Awarded International Prize for Advances in Plant Research

Article ID: 709372

Julian Schroeder Awarded International Prize for Advances in Plant Research

University of California San Diego

UC San Diego Distinguished Professor Julian Schroeder has been awarded the Khalifa International Award for Date Palm and Agricultural Innovation.

Released:
11-Mar-2019 12:00 PM EDT

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