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Science

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Hydrogels, Voltage, soft power, electric eel, Implants, Power, electric organ, Anirvan Guha, Thomas B. H, Schroeder, Aaron Lamoureaux, Gloria Vanrenterghem, David Sept, Max Shtein, Jerry Yang, Michael Mayer, University of Fribourg, University Of Michigan, University of California, San Diego, Biophysical Society 62nd Meeting, Biophysical Society

Electric Eel-Inspired Device Reaches 110 Volts

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In an effort to create a power source for future implantable technologies, a team of researchers developed an electric eel-inspired device that produced 110 volts from gels filled with water, called hydrogels. Their results show potential for a soft power source to draw on a biological system’s chemical energy. Anirvan Guha will present the research during the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, Feb. 17-21.

Science

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Enzyme, Antibiotic Resistance, Bacteria, Antibiotic, Biophysics, Molecular, electric field, Catalysis, Samuel H. Schneider, Jacek A. Kozuch, Steven G. Boxer, Stanford University, Biophysical Society 62nd Meeting, Biophysical Society

An Enzyme’s Evolution from Changing Electric Fields and Resisting Antibiotics

Bacteria can produce enzymes that make them resistant to antibiotics; one example is the TEM beta-lactamase enzyme, which enables bacteria to develop a resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillin and cephalosporins. Researchers at Stanford University are studying this area -- how an enzyme changes and becomes antibiotic-resistant -- and will present their work during the Biophysical Society’s 62nd Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, 2018.

Medicine

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Mitosis, cell, Cancer Cells, Cancer, Bayesian, Yeast, spindle pole body, Chromosomes, cell structure, Shruthi Viswanath, Massimiliano Bonomi, Seung Joong Kim, Vadim A. Klenchin, Keenan Taylor, King C. Yabut, Neil T. Umbreit, Janet Meehl, Michele H. Jones, Javier Velazquez-Muriel, Mark Winey, Ivan Rayment, Trisha N. Davis, Andrej Sali, Eric D. Muller, University o

Studying Mitosis’ Structure to Understand the Inside of Cancer Cells

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Cell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell. During mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers assemble the spindle fibers that separate the copying chromosomes of DNA. While scientists are familiar with MTOCs’ existence and the role they play in cell division, their actual physical structure remains poorly understood. Researchers are now trying to decipher their molecular architecture, and they will present their work during the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21.

Science

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Circadian Clock, Circadian, Protein, Biological Clock, Cyanobacteria, Bacteria, biological function, Andy LiWang, University of California, Merced, Biophysical Society 62nd Meeting, Biophysical Society

What Makes Circadian Clocks Tick?

Circadian clocks arose as an adaptation to dramatic swings in daylight hours and temperature caused by the Earth’s rotation, but we still don’t fully understand how they work. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, Andy LiWang, University of California, Merced, will present his lab’s work studying the circadian clock of blue-green colored cyanobacteria. LiWang’s group discovered that how the proteins move hour by hour is central to cyanobacteria’s circadian clock function.

Medicine

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Ras protein, Cancer, Cell Membrane, Signaling Pathway, Biophysics, cancer signaling, Oncogene, Stephen G. Sligar, Michael C. Gregory, Mark A. McLean, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Biophysical Society 62nd Meeting, Biophysical Society

Ras Protein’s Role in Spreading Cancer

Protein systems make up the complex signaling pathways that control whether a cell divides or, in some cases, metastasizes. Ras proteins have long been the focus of cancer research because of their role as “on/off switch” signaling pathways that control cell division and failure to die like healthy cells do. Now, a team of researchers has been able to study precisely how Ras proteins interact with cell membrane surfaces.

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Membrane, cell, Phospholipid, insoluble, Hydrophilic, Hydrophobic, Protein Structure, cell structure, William Dowhan, Mikhail Bodanov, Heidi Vitrac, University of Texas-Houston, Biophysics, Biophysical Society 62nd Meeting, Biophysical Society, Lipid

Using Mutant Bacteria to Study How Changes in Membrane Proteins Affect Cell Functions

Phospholipids are water insoluble “building blocks” that define the membrane barrier surrounding cells and provide the structural scaffold and environment where membrane proteins reside. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, William Dowhan from the University of Texas-Houston McGovern Medical School will present his group’s work exploring how the membrane protein phospholipid environment determines its structure and function.

Medicine

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Breast Cancer, Cancer, Cancer Treatment, Cancer Progression, Cancer Cells, Aggressive Breast Cancer, local environment, Biophysics, Deep Parikh, Mary Stack, Hongjun Wang, Stevens Institute Of Technology, Biophysical Society 62nd Meeting, Biophysical Society

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Feb-2018 8:00 AM EST

Medicine

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Paternal, Development, Neurodevelopment, Autism, Depression, Sperm, genetic, DNA, Epigenetic, Gene Expression, Maternal, Brain Development, Neuroscience, Aaas, AAAS Annual Meeting

New Research: Increased Stress on Fathers Leads to Brain Development Changes in Offspring

New research in mice has found that a father’s stress affects the brain development of his offspring. This stress changes the father’s sperm, which can then alter the brain development of the child. This new research provides a much better understanding of the key role that fathers play in the brain development of offspring.

Science

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polymer solar cells, Solar Energy, Renewable Energy, Solar Cell, Wearable Technology, Organic, Polymer, Power, Food Packaging, Paul R. Berger, Minjae Kim, Ohio State University, Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 20-Feb-2018 11:00 AM EST

Medicine

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Nursing, Midwifery, Midwife, Nurse, johns hopkins school of nursing, Johns Hopkins, World Health Organization, World Health Organization Collaborating Centre, Patricia Davidson, Global Health, Community Health, Universal Health Care

The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing Named WHO Coordinating Center for Nursing and Midwifery

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The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing has been elected as the Coordinating Centre for the Global Network of World Health Organization Collaborating Centres for Nursing and Midwifery.







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