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Embargo will expire:
18-Jan-2019 3:30 AM EST
Released to reporters:
17-Jan-2019 3:30 PM EST

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Article ID: 706662

Low-Intensity Electric Fields Applied to Scalp Can Stop, Slow Growth of Tumor Cells in Newly-Diagnosed Glioblastoma

Henry Ford Health System

Henry Ford Cancer Institute is one of the few cancer programs in Southeast Michigan fighting the most common and deadly brain cancer with tumor-treatment fields, a low-intensity alternating electric field applied with a wearable device that stops or slows the growth of tumor cells in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM).

Released:
17-Jan-2019 12:05 PM EST
  • Embargo expired:
    16-Jan-2019 6:30 PM EST

Article ID: 706409

Nearly a quarter of antibiotic prescriptions for children and adults may be unnecessary

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

1 in 10 children and about 1 in 6 adults with private insurance received antibiotics they didn’t need at least once in 2016, a new Michigan Medicine study suggests.

Released:
14-Jan-2019 11:05 AM EST
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Article ID: 706594

Acupressure relieves long-term symptoms of breast cancer treatment, study finds

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

A new study finds acupressure could be a low-cost, at-home solution to a suite of persistent side effects that linger after breast cancer treatment ends.

Released:
16-Jan-2019 12:05 PM EST
Embargo will expire:
21-Jan-2019 1:00 AM EST
Released to reporters:
16-Jan-2019 10:05 AM EST

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Jan-2019 1:00 AM EST

The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application.
If you have not yet registered, please do so. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Article ID: 706569

High Pesticide Exposure Among Farmers Linked to Poor Sense of Smell Later

Michigan State University

A Michigan State University study is the first to show an association between unusually high pesticide exposure and poor sense of smell among aging farmers.

Released:
16-Jan-2019 10:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jan-2019 7:05 PM EST

Article ID: 706399

Poisons or medicines? Cyanobacteria toxins protect tiny lake dwellers from parasites

University of Michigan

The cyanobacteria blooms that plague western Lake Erie each summer are both an unsightly nuisance and a potential public health hazard, producing liver toxins that can be harmful to humans and their pets.

Released:
14-Jan-2019 9:50 AM EST
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Article ID: 706532

Wayne State fights “fatbergs”

Wayne State University Division of Research

A research team led by Carol Miller, professor of Civil and Environmental engineering at Wayne State, recently received an $80,000 grant from the National Science Foundation focused on "fatbergs." The team will utilize real-time video, pressure data and advanced chemical analysis to advance the understanding of the physical and chemical structure of massive buildups of fats, oils and greases (FOGs, also referred to as "fatbergs") that cause blockages in sewer systems. Results will be used to identify potential risks associated with blockages and inform future targeted prevention and mitigation efforts.

Released:
15-Jan-2019 3:05 PM EST
fatberg1.JPG

Article ID: 706532

Wayne State fights “fatbergs”

Wayne State University Division of Research

A research team led by Carol Miller, professor of Civil and Environmental engineering at Wayne State, recently received an $80,000 grant from the National Science Foundation focused on "fatbergs." The team will utilize real-time video, pressure data and advanced chemical analysis to advance the understanding of the physical and chemical structure of massive buildups of fats, oils and greases (FOGs, also referred to as "fatbergs") that cause blockages in sewer systems. Results will be used to identify potential risks associated with blockages and inform future targeted prevention and mitigation efforts.

Released:
15-Jan-2019 3:05 PM EST

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