Latest News from: American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

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Newswise: Gallery of Fluid Motion: Capturing Liquids and Gases in Action
Released: 2-Dec-2019 3:10 PM EST
Gallery of Fluid Motion: Capturing Liquids and Gases in Action
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Tears stream down your face. A beer flows down the side of a pint glass. Fluid mechanics is central to understanding the world around us. The beauty of fluid motion was on display last week in Seattle, where more than 3,000 scientists gathered for the 72nd Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society’s Division of Fluid Dynamics. Created in 1987, the Gallery of Fluid Motion (GFM) is the premier visual record of contemporary fluid mechanics.

Newswise: Fire Ants’ Raft Building Skills React as Fluid Forces Change
20-Nov-2019 1:50 PM EST
Fire Ants’ Raft Building Skills React as Fluid Forces Change
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Fire ants build living rafts to survive floods and rainy seasons. Georgia Tech scientists are studying if a fire ant colony’s ability to respond to changes in their environment during a flood is an instinctual behavior and how fluid forces make them respond.

Newswise: Chemical Herders Could Impact Oil Spill Cleanup
20-Nov-2019 11:00 AM EST
Chemical Herders Could Impact Oil Spill Cleanup
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Oil spills in the ocean can cause devastation to wildlife, so effective cleanup is a top priority. Research shows the effects of chemical herders, which are agents that may be used to concentrate oil spills, on wave breaking.

Newswise: Harvesting Fog Can Provide Fresh Water in Desert Regions
20-Nov-2019 8:30 AM EST
Harvesting Fog Can Provide Fresh Water in Desert Regions
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Fog harvesting is a potential practical source of fresh water in foggy coastal deserts, and current solutions rely on meter scale nets/meshes. The mesh geometry, however, presents a physiologically inappropriate shape for millimeter scale bulk bodies, like insects.

Newswise: Fossils Reveal Swimming Patterns of Long Extinct Cephalopod
19-Nov-2019 2:50 PM EST
Fossils Reveal Swimming Patterns of Long Extinct Cephalopod
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Computational fluid dynamics can be used to study how extinct animals used to swim. Scientists studied 65 million-year-old cephalopod fossils to gain deeper understanding of modern-day cephalopod ecosystems.

Newswise: Low Frequency Sound May Predict Tornado Formation
19-Nov-2019 2:25 PM EST
Low Frequency Sound May Predict Tornado Formation
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

How can you tell when a storm is going to produce a tornado even before the twister forms? Research from Oklahoma State University and University of Nebraska-Lincoln indicates prior to tornado formation, storms emit low-frequency sounds.

Newswise: Reports of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Demise Greatly Exaggerated
18-Nov-2019 11:30 AM EST
Reports of Jupiter’s Great Red Spot Demise Greatly Exaggerated
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

The shrinking of the clouds of the Great Red Spot on Jupiter has been well documented with photographic evidence from the last decade. However, researchers said there is no evidence the vortex itself has changed in size or intensity.

Newswise: Fluid Dynamics Taught Through Dance
19-Nov-2019 2:20 PM EST
Fluid Dynamics Taught Through Dance
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

A collaboration at University of Michigan is taking a unique approach to fluid mechanics by teaching it through dance, creating Kármán Vortex Street, a dance improvisation guided by physics properties.

Newswise: Not All Changeups Are Created Equal; Seam Shifted Wake Baffles Hitters
18-Nov-2019 1:00 PM EST
Not All Changeups Are Created Equal; Seam Shifted Wake Baffles Hitters
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

While changing the rotation rate/axis of a thrown baseball has long been a weapon in a pitcher’s arsenal, some pitchers manipulate the baseball’s wake to create unexpected movement from a familiar delivery of his changeup.

Newswise: Heating Techniques Could Improve Treatment of Macular Degeneration
18-Nov-2019 8:30 AM EST
Heating Techniques Could Improve Treatment of Macular Degeneration
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Age-related macular degeneration is the primary cause of central vision loss and results in the center of the visual field being blurred or fully blacked out. Though treatable, some methods can be ineffective or cause unwanted side effects. Jinglin Huang, a graduate student in medical engineering at Caltech, suggests inefficient fluid mixing of the injected medicine and the gel within the eye may be to blame.

Newswise: Shaking Head to Get Rid of Water in Ears Could Cause Brain Damage
18-Nov-2019 10:00 AM EST
Shaking Head to Get Rid of Water in Ears Could Cause Brain Damage
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Trapped water in the ear canal can cause infection and even damage, but it turns out that one of the most common methods people use to get rid of water in their ears can also cause complications. Researchers show shaking the head to free trapped water can cause brain damage in small children.

Newswise: Optimal Archery Feather Design Depends On Environmental Conditions
18-Nov-2019 1:00 PM EST
Optimal Archery Feather Design Depends On Environmental Conditions
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

When it comes to archery, choosing the right feathers for an arrow is the key to winning. This necessity for precision makes it crucial to understand how environment and design effect arrows in flight.

Released: 21-Nov-2019 1:45 PM EST
Schedule for the APS DFD Press Conferences with Live Webcasts from Seattle
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Press conferences for the 72nd Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics in Seattle will be held Monday, Nov. 25, at the Washington State Convention Center. The conferences, which will be webcast, will focus on research into how flow control is making some MLB pitchers nearly unhittable, predicting tornado formation from the sounds that storms make and teaching fluid mechanics through dance, as well as other discoveries in fluid dynamics.

Released: 15-Oct-2019 2:40 PM EDT
Save the Date: Major Meeting on Fluid Dynamics in Seattle, Nov. 23-26, 2019
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

The American Physical Society’s Division of Fluid Dynamics 72nd Annual Meeting will take place on Nov. 23-26, 2019, in Seattle, Washington. Journalists are invited to attend the meeting for free. Live press webcasts, featuring a selection of newsworthy research, will take place during the meeting. Fluid dynamics is an interdisciplinary field that investigates visible and invisible phenomena from a wide range of disciplines including engineering, physics, biology, oceanography, atmospheric science and geology.

13-Nov-2018 10:30 AM EST
Babies Born with Broken Hearts
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Researchers are exploring how irregular filling mechanics may contribute to defects in developing fetal hearts because inefficient filling leads to energy losses that alter the heart’s structure and performance, and studying how filling mechanics and flow structure change over the course of gestation. During the American Physical Society’s Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20, they will discuss the team’s findings on human fetal cardiac flow measurements collected from normal and abnormal fetal echocardiogram exams.

Newswise: Studying Water Flow for More Efficient Aquaponic Systems
14-Nov-2018 8:05 AM EST
Studying Water Flow for More Efficient Aquaponic Systems
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

In aquaponics, the hydroponic crops use the nutrients from fish waste as fertilizer while the fish benefit from the plants’ nutrient uptake capability to improve water quality. The treated water is then recirculated to the plant grow beds and fish culture tanks via a pipe system. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire, who are studying ways to improve water flow for more efficient aquaponic systems, will present their work at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20.

Newswise:Video Embedded reducing-the-impact-forces-of-water-entry-
VIDEO
13-Nov-2018 11:30 AM EST
Reducing the Impact Forces of Water Entry
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

As professional divers complete what’s known as a rip dive, their hands remove water in front of the body, creating a cavity that reduces the initial impact force. The rest of the body is aligned to shoot through the same cavity created by the hands. Using the hands to create cavities in the water's surface is similar to the concept behind the fluid-structure studies that researchers at Utah State University are conducting using spheres. They’ll present their work at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20.

Newswise:Video Embedded aquatic-animals-that-jump-out-of-water-inspire-leaping-robots
VIDEO
9-Nov-2018 11:05 AM EST
Aquatic Animals that Jump Out of Water Inspire Leaping Robots
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Ever watch aquatic animals jump out of the water and wonder how they manage to do it in such a streamlined and graceful way? Researchers who specialize in water entry and exit in nature had the same question. During the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20, they will present their work designing a robotic system inspired by jumping copepods and frogs to illuminate some of the fluid dynamics at play when aquatic animals jump.

Newswise:Video Embedded the-subtle-science-of-wok-tossing
VIDEO
13-Nov-2018 8:05 AM EST
The Subtle Science of Wok Tossing
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Wok tossing is essential for making a good fried rice -- or so claim a group of researchers presenting new work at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20. The researchers became interested in the physics of cooking and, seeking to satiate their curiosity, they focused on stir-fry, which lies at the heart of Chinese cuisine. The team set out to isolate the key elements of this venerable cooking technique.

Newswise: Move Over Rover: There’s A New Sniffing Powerhouse in the Neighborhood
9-Nov-2018 11:05 AM EST
Move Over Rover: There’s A New Sniffing Powerhouse in the Neighborhood
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Some animals explore, interpret and understand the world with such sensitivity in their noses that people have enlisted canines to help solve crime and detect cancer on the breath. Scientists at Georgia Tech are now homing in on the secrets behind animals’ super sniffers to develop an artificial chemical sensor that could be used for a variety of tasks, from food safety to national security. Thomas Spencer will present the group’s latest design for an electronic nose that concentrates odors for improved chemical sensing at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20.

Newswise: What Smart Hazmat Suits and Sonora Cactus Skins Have in Common
12-Nov-2018 7:05 AM EST
What Smart Hazmat Suits and Sonora Cactus Skins Have in Common
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Motivated by observations of desert flora and fauna, researchers in Arizona began experimenting in the laboratory to characterize cactuses' microscopic 3D epidermal structure at dry and wet times of the year. They apply the lessons in wettability -- the study of how droplets interact with solids -- to engineering surfaces for industrial applications, and will present the discoveries from this Sonoran wettability research at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20.

Newswise: Researchers Propose Solutions for Urine Sample Splash Dilemma
13-Nov-2018 10:20 AM EST
Researchers Propose Solutions for Urine Sample Splash Dilemma
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Urinating into a cup may be a medical necessity at times, but it's often uncomfortable, embarrassing and messy -- especially for women. But what if there were a way to comfortably provide a sample without the splashback? Researchers have created a set of experiments using an anatomically correct female urethra that produced a jet of water with a pressure and flow equivalent to a human bladder. During the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20, they’ll describe the findings and potential implications.

Newswise: Swarmlike Collective Behavior in Bicycling
9-Nov-2018 10:05 AM EST
Swarmlike Collective Behavior in Bicycling
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Nature is full of examples of large-scale collective behavior; humans also exhibit this behavior, most notably in pelotons, the mass of riders in bicycle races. Using aerial video footage of bicycle races, researchers analyzed peloton motion to determine what causes changes in the group’s large-scale collective behavior and found that riders move through the peloton in a manner similar to circulation in a fluid. During the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20, they will describe their work on collective behavior in pelotons.

Newswise:Video Embedded explaining-a-fastball’s-unexpected-twist
VIDEO
13-Nov-2018 12:20 AM EST
Explaining a Fastball’s Unexpected Twist
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

An unexpected twist from fastball can make the difference in winning or losing the World Series. However, “some explanations regarding the different pitches are flat-out wrong,” said Barton Smith, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Utah State University who considers himself a big fan of the game. He and Nazmus Sakib are conducting experiments to explain how baseballs move. Sakib and Smith will present their findings at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20.

13-Nov-2018 11:45 AM EST
Helping Marvel Superheroes to Breathe
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Marvel comics superheroes Ant-Man and the Wasp possess the ability to temporarily shrink down to the size of insects, while retaining the mass and strength of their normal human bodies. But a new study suggests that, when bug-sized, Ant-Man and the Wasp would face serious challenges, including oxygen deprivation. Those challenges, along with their solution-microfluidic technologies, will be described at the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20.

Newswise: Scientists Explain How Wombats Drop Cubed Poop
9-Nov-2018 11:05 AM EST
Scientists Explain How Wombats Drop Cubed Poop
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Wombats are central to a biological mystery in the animal kingdom: How do they produce cube-shaped poop? Patricia Yang at Georgia Tech set out to investigate. Yang studies the hydrodynamics of fluids, including blood, processed food and urine, in the bodies of animals. She was curious how the differences in wombats’ digestive processes and soft tissue structures might explain their oddly shaped scat. During the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting, Nov. 18-20, Yang will explain findings from dissecting the alimentary systems of wombats.

Released: 7-Nov-2018 2:05 PM EST
Major Meeting on Fluid Dynamics This Month in Atlanta, Georgia
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

The American Physical Society’s Division of Fluid Dynamics 71st Annual Meeting will take place Nov. 18-20 at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Georgia. It will be one of the largest conferences in fluid dynamics this year, with more than 3,000 attendees expected from around the world. Journalists are invited to attend the meeting for free. Press registration may be obtained by emailing the American Institute of Physics' Media Line at media@aip.org.

Newswise:Video Embedded bursting-citrus-peel-oil-glands-inspire-new-approach-for-microjetting-fluids
VIDEO
14-Nov-2017 3:05 PM EST
Bursting Citrus Peel Oil Glands Inspire New Approach for Microjetting Fluids
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

When was the last time you took a close look at an orange, lime or lemon peel? Outer citrus peels are covered with tiny oil glands or cavities that can explode in an outward direction, often spraying toward you, if bent in an attempt to gain access to the inner fruit. Researchers at the University of Central Florida set out to explore how the material properties during this phenomenon enable the production of these high-speed jets that often go unnoticed or unappreciated, even by avid citrus consumers. They’ll discuss their work at the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

14-Nov-2017 3:45 PM EST
Snoring Sounds Provide Insight for Obstructive Airway Disorders
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Often unnoticed by the patient, Obstructive Sleep Apnea results in fragmented sleep patterns causing daytime fatigue and cardiovascular problems. However, the question remains of how to differentiate normal snoring from sleep apnea. Researchers will present their results on the 3-D modeling of uvula vibrational patterns and sound frequencies during snoring at the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Newswise: Bubbles Clustering While Pouring Stout Beers?
13-Nov-2017 8:05 AM EST
Bubbles Clustering While Pouring Stout Beers?
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

If you’ve poured a stout beer into a pint glass, you may have wondered about the or physics behind the rapid rise of bubbles and three-color shift when dark, medium and light shades are all clearly visible, before it transitions to simply beer and foam. During the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017, researchers from will present their work exploring the fluid dynamics behind this type of bubble clustering in stout and nitrogenized stout beers and carbonated drinks.

Newswise: Plesiosaur Flippers Inspire a Steering Mechanism for Swimming Robotic Vehicle
14-Nov-2017 8:05 AM EST
Plesiosaur Flippers Inspire a Steering Mechanism for Swimming Robotic Vehicle
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Plesiosaurs, who thrived during the early to middle Jurassic Period, used four paddlelike flippers of nearly equal size and musculature to swim. Despite the seemingly subpar engineering, the fossil record reveals that plesiosaurs were widespread and prolific. This inspired a team in the U.K. to explore how swimming with four flippers might be advantageous compared to two. They’ll present their work during the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Newswise: Underwater Sniffing of Star-Nosed Moles Is Mimicked for Chemical-Detecting ‘Electronic Nose’
14-Nov-2017 9:05 AM EST
Underwater Sniffing of Star-Nosed Moles Is Mimicked for Chemical-Detecting ‘Electronic Nose’
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

The star-nosed mole has several unusual abilities. One of them is “sniffing” underwater by blowing bubbles and quickly re-inhaling them, detecting odors of its prey through the water. The moles’ “star” nose features a ring of tiny, pink tentacles and is the most sensitive known touch organ of any mammal. Researchers will present their work exploring the star-nosed moles’ unusual underwater sniffing ability during the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

14-Nov-2017 1:05 PM EST
Stinging Cells Pack a Powerful Pressure
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

The stinging cells of jellyfish, called nematocytes, have evolved to be one of the world’s most efficient predation tools. The nematocysts consist of a capsule and folded tubule, and use high pressure and acceleration for defense and locomotion and, more importantly, to capture prey. Inconsistencies in a previous conceptual explanation of the stinging cell mechanism were identified using a microfluidic system and mathematical models. Researchers will share their mathematical model of nemotocytes at the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017. The model demonstrates how environmental modifications can reduce the impact of jellyfish stinging capacity.

Newswise:Video Embedded raindrops-splash-pathogens-onto-crops
VIDEO
10-Nov-2017 11:05 AM EST
Raindrops Splash Pathogens Onto Crops
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses or fungi, cause harmful plant disease and often lead to the destruction of agricultural fields. With many possible dispersal methods, it can often be difficult to assess the damage of a pathogen’s impact before it’s too late. At the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, researchers from Virginia Tech will present their work on rain drop dispersal mechanisms of rust fungus on wheat plants.

Newswise: 'Magic' Sinus Paths Could Mean New Instructions for Nasal Sprays
10-Nov-2017 1:05 PM EST
'Magic' Sinus Paths Could Mean New Instructions for Nasal Sprays
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Sinus infections, inflammation and nasal congestion constantly plague Americans, often leading to unpleasant symptoms and even missed days of work. Traditional nasal spray anti-inflammatory medications attempt to treat the symptoms noninvasively, but are not very efficient in transmitting the active drug ingredients directly into the sinus cavities. Researchers from the University of North Carolina will present their research on the anatomy-based flow physics in nasal cavities which generate “magical” streamlines for sinus drug delivery at the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Newswise:Video Embedded the-physics-behind-dandelion-seed-plume-dispersal-revealed
VIDEO
10-Nov-2017 2:20 PM EST
The Physics Behind Dandelion Seed Plume Dispersal Revealed
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

The fluffy dandelion seed head infuriates gardeners, but delights physicists. That’s because those seeds may lend key insights into the physics of parachutes, useful for designing small drones, or micro air vehicles. An interdisciplinary collaboration at the University of Edinburgh will present their findings on the topic at the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21. Investigators reveal why, at low Reynolds numbers, the rules for big parachutes don’t apply to small dandelions.

Newswise:Video Embedded explosive-hot-oil-droplets-could-hurt-your-skin-and-air-quality
VIDEO
13-Nov-2017 8:05 AM EST
'Explosive' Hot Oil Droplets Could Hurt Your Skin -- and Air Quality
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Cooking in a frying pan with oil can quickly become dangerous if “explosive” hot oil droplets jump out of the pan, leading to painful burns. But these droplets may be doing something even more damaging: contributing to indoor air pollution. A group of researchers exploring these “explosive droplets” will present their work to uncover the fluid dynamics behind this phenomenon during the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Released: 7-Nov-2017 7:05 AM EST
Save the Date: American Physical Society Division of Fluid Dynamics (APS-DFD) Annual Meeting in Denver, Nov. 19-21
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

The fluid properties of liquid, gases and even particles are constantly at work in our lives and around us. Covering topics including citrus fruit microjets, sinus pathways for drug delivery, the spread of pathogens by rain, and even beer bubbles, the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics meeting, held Nov. 19-21, 2017, in Colorado, will uncover unique and puzzling mysteries of fluids and their applications.

16-Nov-2016 1:05 PM EST
Investigating Blood Back Spatter
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

The popularity of forensics and crime scene investigation fueled by a glut of television programs has familiarized many of us with the basics of forensic medicine. However, not much is, in fact, understood about blood back spatter. A team of researchers from the University of Illinois and Iowa State University is exploring the science behind blood back spatter using fluid dynamics to develop a theoretical model for predicting and interpreting blood spatter from gunshot wounds, and it could significantly impact the field of forensic science. The work will be presented at the 69th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics held in Portland, Oregon, Nov. 20-22, 2016.

Newswise:Video Embedded molasses-creates-a-sticky-situation
VIDEO
16-Nov-2016 1:05 PM EST
Molasses Creates a Sticky Situation
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Fluid dynamics met history for a team of researchers who studied the Boston Molasses Flood, a disaster that claimed 21 lives, injured 150 and flattened buildings in the Commercial Street area of Boston in 1919. During the 69th APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting, a trio of fluid dynamics physicists at Harvard University will explain how they were inspired to study this event by a group of undergraduates who produced a parody rap video about the flood for a project in their fluid dynamics course. The trio examined this historic, yet not well known, event from a scientific perspective.

Newswise:Video Embedded sparkling-firework-droplets
VIDEO
16-Nov-2016 3:05 PM EST
Sparkling Firework Droplets
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

In Japan, many adults hold fond childhood memories of fireworks as a symbol of the summer season. Senko-hanabi, which translates to “sparkling fireworks,” emit a small fireball with streaks of light akin to pine needle structures. As one of the most popular hand-held fireworks since the early Edo period, from 1603 to 1868, they’re renowned for fragile beauty accompanied by a soothing sound. During the 69th DFD meeting, researchers will describe work uncovering the liquid dynamics at play behind Senko-hanabi’s beauty.

17-Nov-2016 7:05 AM EST
Understanding the Mechanics of Breastfeeding
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Breastfeeding is a topic that creates discussion and at times even controversy. However, some basic questions about its biology still remain. For instance, does successful infant feeding depend on the mechanics of the breast and, conversely, does breast health depend on breastfeeding? It has been virtually impossible to study these complex dynamics and the delicate interplay that makes breastfeeding possible, but a pair of researchers are working together to build a biomimetic breast that will allow scientists to study how the breast behaves during its primary function: infant feeding.

Newswise: Paddle or Rake to Improve Your Swimming Stroke?
17-Nov-2016 8:05 AM EST
Paddle or Rake to Improve Your Swimming Stroke?
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Note to elite swimmers: Are you looking for a competitive edge in the hydrodynamics of your front crawl?

Newswise:Video Embedded cat-tongues-are-even-handier-than-you-imagined
VIDEO
17-Nov-2016 9:05 AM EST
Cat Tongues Are Even 'Handier' Than You Imagined
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Have you ever taken a good look at a cat’s tongue? If so, you may have noticed the tiny, sharp “spines” on its surface.

Newswise: Archimedes' Law of Buoyancy Turned Upside Down
17-Nov-2016 1:05 PM EST
Archimedes' Law of Buoyancy Turned Upside Down
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

A team at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, exploring how air bubbles rise within a complex fluid, like those found while processing wet concrete, wondered if they could actually get them to sink instead by shaking the mixture in the right way. During the 69th DFD meeting, the researchers will present their work studying bubbles within complex fluids.

Newswise: Instrumented Drone Measurements Help Wind Farmers Site Turbines to Achieve Greater Efficiency
18-Nov-2016 7:05 AM EST
Instrumented Drone Measurements Help Wind Farmers Site Turbines to Achieve Greater Efficiency
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Wind energy is a key part of the global energy future, expanding rapidly throughout the world in onshore and offshore settings. But to be sustainable, large scale, multi-megawatt (multi-MW) wind farming’s economic efficiencies need to be maximized -- and knowing where to place the turbines within the wind farm is a first step. Bring on the drones. Moreover, design novel instrumented drones with a suite of sensors capable of gathering precise field data in the complex flow and terrain of an actual wind farm. This was the approach of researchers from Switzerland.

Released: 14-Nov-2016 12:05 PM EST
Save The Date: Major Scientific Meeting in Portland, Oregon Nov. 20-22, 2016
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

The 69th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society – Division of Fluid Dynamics this month will cover fluid dynamics advances across many disciplines, with applications including forensics, biomimetic devices, sports dynamics, bubble formation and more

Newswise:Video Embedded surf-s-up-how-to-catch-a-perfect-wave
VIDEO
13-Nov-2015 9:05 AM EST
Surf's Up: How to Catch a Perfect Wave
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Along coastlines from California to Australia, you'll see surfers trying to catch that perfect wave. How they find and ride that wave relies on feel and intuition, developed through skill and experience. Now researchers from the LadHyX Hydrodynamics Laboratory of École Polytechnique in France are trying to quantify this ability, studying the conditions necessary for a surfer to catch a wave. They'll present their findings at APS's DFD 2015 Meeting.

Newswise: A Flounder's Disappearing Act Explained by Physics
13-Nov-2015 11:05 AM EST
A Flounder's Disappearing Act Explained by Physics
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

Simply oscillating its fins is all a flounder, a flat fish, needs to do to resuspend sand and quickly disappear beneath it to hide. By discovering the physics at play, researchers in France are hoping to provide a new flounder-inspired solution to a common technological challenge: the resuspension of granular material within a fluid. They'll discuss their findings at the American Physical Society's 2015 DFD Meeting.

Newswise: And When the Bubbles Burst, Thunder in Neurons
16-Nov-2015 8:05 AM EST
And When the Bubbles Burst, Thunder in Neurons
American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics

In the fleeting moments after a liquid is subjected to a sudden change in pressure, microscopic bubbles rapidly form and collapse in a process known as cavitation. In the human brain, this is believed to be a mechanistic cause of traumatic brain injury, or TBI, but the phenomenon has yet to be directly observed in brain tissue because the bubbles appear and disappear within microseconds. To address this, researchers are seeking to understand how cavitation might injure neurons by using a 3-D imaging system coupled with a diffraction grating to examine their post-exposure morphology. They will present their recent findings APS’s DFD 2015 Meeting.


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