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Released: 22-Nov-2022 5:00 PM EST
World’s heaviest bird may be self-medicating on plants used in traditional medicine
Frontiers

Researchers show that great bustards in Spain prefer to eat two plant species with compounds active in vitro against protozoa, nematodes, and fungi: corn poppies and purple viper’s bugloss. Males, who spend much time and energy on sexual displays during the mating season, have a stronger preference for these plants than females, and more so during the mating season than at other times of the year. The authors thus consider great bustards as prime candidates for non-human animals that self-medicate, but stress that more research is needed to definitively prove this.

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Embargo will expire: 29-Nov-2022 2:00 PM EST Released to reporters: 22-Nov-2022 12:15 PM EST

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 29-Nov-2022 2:00 PM EST The Newswise PressPass gives verified journalists access to embargoed stories. Please log in to complete a presspass application. If you have not yet registered, please Register. When you fill out the registration form, please identify yourself as a reporter in order to advance to the presspass application form.

Released: 22-Nov-2022 8:50 AM EST
Three days to help save our coastal habitats
University of Portsmouth

A global gathering of marine scientists has set a three-day symposium to work out how we can maximise the many life and planet protecting services we as humans benefit from our coastal habitats.

Newswise: Social bees travel greater distances for food than their solitary counterparts, study finds
15-Nov-2022 4:05 AM EST
Social bees travel greater distances for food than their solitary counterparts, study finds
University of Bristol

Social bees such as honeybees and bumblebees have larger foraging ranges, according to researchers at the University of Bristol.

Released: 16-Nov-2022 12:30 PM EST
To prevent the next pandemic, restore wildlife habitats
Cornell University

Preserving and restoring natural habitats could prevent pathogens that originate in wildlife from spilling over into domesticated animals and humans, according to two new companion studies.

Newswise: A hard pillbug to swallow: First X-rays of frog feeding show how they consume prey
Released: 16-Nov-2022 12:20 PM EST
A hard pillbug to swallow: First X-rays of frog feeding show how they consume prey
Florida Museum of Natural History

The phrase “to swallow one’s tongue” has been around since at least the 1880s and has been repurposed in several languages to mean everything from falling silent to a general feeling of fear.

Newswise: New Critical Period of Embryonic Sex Determination in Sea Turtles Identified
Released: 15-Nov-2022 8:30 AM EST
New Critical Period of Embryonic Sex Determination in Sea Turtles Identified
Florida Atlantic University

A study shows that the temperature of the incubation environment could influence the sexualization of the gonads (reproductive organs) in sea turtles earlier than what is currently recognized. Researchers developed a new way to integrate the effect of thermal fluctuations on embryonic sex determination and predict sex ratios with much better accuracy than prior models. By measuring the strength of masculinization or feminization of temperatures using novel parameters, they have uncovered how temperature-sensitive sex determination works. These findings could be similar for other reptiles with temperature-dependent sex determination because similar molecular determinants and enzymatic mechanisms are at play.

Newswise: Researchers produce first-ever ‘family tree’ for aquarium-bred corals
Released: 14-Nov-2022 12:05 PM EST
Researchers produce first-ever ‘family tree’ for aquarium-bred corals
California Academy of Sciences

Corals bred in public aquaria provide novel research opportunities and a healthy stock for outplanting into the wild, essential components of a thriving future for coral reef ecosystems, which support around 25% of all life in Earth’s oceans.

Newswise: WVU expert offers tips for safe hunting season
Released: 14-Nov-2022 9:00 AM EST
WVU expert offers tips for safe hunting season
West Virginia University

With the woods calling to many this month, a West Virginia University Extension wildlife specialist is reminding hunters safety is a priority.

Released: 10-Nov-2022 11:25 AM EST
Forensics used to reverse the decline of biodiversity in Europe
Staffordshire University

Staffordshire University is contributing forensic intelligence to an ambitious project which aims to protect endangered species like wolf, bear, lynx, and sturgeon in remote areas of Europe.

Released: 8-Nov-2022 9:05 PM EST
Beavers will become a bigger boon to river water quality as U.S. West warms
Stanford University

As climate change worsens water quality and threatens ecosystems, the famous dams of beavers may help lessen the damage.

Newswise: Why Fish Look Down When They Swim
Released: 2-Nov-2022 12:05 PM EDT
Why Fish Look Down When They Swim
Northwestern University

Just as you might look down at the sidewalk as you walk, fish look downward when they swim, a new study by a Northwestern University-led international collaboration has confirmed.

Newswise: Permanent Daylight Saving Time Would Reduce Deer-Vehicle Collisions, Study Shows
Released: 2-Nov-2022 11:50 AM EDT
Permanent Daylight Saving Time Would Reduce Deer-Vehicle Collisions, Study Shows
University of Washington

Adopting permanent DST in the United States would reduce deer-vehicle collisions and likely prevent an estimated 36,550 deer deaths, 33 human deaths, 2,054 human injuries and $1.19 billion in costs each year. Deer-vehicle collisions would decrease under permanent DST because skies would be brighter later in the evening

Newswise: New species of owl discovered in the rainforests of Príncipe Island, Central Africa
Released: 1-Nov-2022 1:40 PM EDT
New species of owl discovered in the rainforests of Príncipe Island, Central Africa
Pensoft Publishers

A new species of owl has just been described from Príncipe Island, part of the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe in Central Africa.

Newswise: Photos Suggest Rhino Horns Have Shrunk Over Past Century, Likely Due to Hunting
Released: 1-Nov-2022 1:25 PM EDT
Photos Suggest Rhino Horns Have Shrunk Over Past Century, Likely Due to Hunting
University of Cambridge

By scrutinising over a century’s worth of photos, University of Cambridge researchers have made the first ever measurements that show rhinoceros horns have gradually decreased in size over time.

Newswise: Half of the Data Deficient Species May Be Threatened with Extinction
Released: 1-Nov-2022 12:30 PM EDT
Half of the Data Deficient Species May Be Threatened with Extinction
Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU)

Often we simply do not know enough about a species to know how it is doing. On the recognized red list from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), thousands of plants and animals are listed as "data deficient."

Newswise: Unlike turkeys headed for Thanksgiving tables, wild ones are vanishing as a WVU researcher hunts for clues
Released: 1-Nov-2022 8:05 AM EDT
Unlike turkeys headed for Thanksgiving tables, wild ones are vanishing as a WVU researcher hunts for clues
West Virginia University

Wild turkey populations are disappearing in many states and a West Virginia University researcher is working to find out why.

Newswise: Climate Change Negatively Affecting School Sharks
24-Oct-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Climate Change Negatively Affecting School Sharks
American Physiological Society (APS)

Preliminary research data suggest warmer temperatures and increased salt levels might have negative effects on the behavior and physiology of school sharks.

Newswise: Math Model Shows Climate Change Puts Rainforest Animal’s Survival in Jeopardy
24-Oct-2022 9:00 AM EDT
Math Model Shows Climate Change Puts Rainforest Animal’s Survival in Jeopardy
American Physiological Society (APS)

A South American marsupial with ties to an ancient line of animals may go extinct in the next half-century due to warming temperatures. Researchers from the Universidad Austral de Chile will present a mathematical model of the monito del monte’s survival predictions this week at the American Physiological Society (APS) Intersociety Meeting in Comparative Physiology: From Organism to Omics in an Uncertain World conference in San Diego.

Newswise: NASA Laser Project Benefits Animal Researchers, UW Scientists Show
Released: 28-Oct-2022 3:30 PM EDT
NASA Laser Project Benefits Animal Researchers, UW Scientists Show
University of Wyoming

Scientists researching forest carnivores such as martens, foxes and coyotes spend hours clambering through rugged terrain, sometimes in deep snow, placing and baiting camera traps to learn about animals’ behavior in relation to their habitat.


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