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  • A sketch of the single-celled parasite Trichomonas vaginalis, which causes a sexually transmitted disease affecting some 170 million people. A team of scientists led by Jane Carlton, Ph.D., at NYU School of Medicine has sequenced the parasite's genome.
    Emilio F. Merino, Dept. of Medical Parasitology, NYU School of Medicine
    A sketch of the single-celled parasite Trichomonas vaginalis, which causes a sexually transmitted disease affecting some 170 million people. A team of scientists led by Jane Carlton, Ph.D., at NYU School of Medicine has sequenced the parasite's genome.
  • As part of their genome project, the scientists created a logo to raise awareness about the public health urgency to better understand and combat T. vaginalis.
    Lis Caler, Ph.D., The Institute for Genomic Research
    As part of their genome project, the scientists created a logo to raise awareness about the public health urgency to better understand and combat T. vaginalis.
  • A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph of Trichomonas vaginalis (green) and vaginal tissue (pink). Sequencing the genome of T. vaginalis has given the researchers gory reading material on some of the pathogen's foul habits. The parasite latches onto vaginal tissue and forms tendril-like projections into it. The pathogen also secretes a series of proteins which destroy the vaginal epithelial cells, the cells that make up the vaginal tissue surface.
    Antonio Pereira-Neves and Marlene Benchimol, Santa Ursula University, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
    A color-enhanced scanning electron micrograph of Trichomonas vaginalis (green) and vaginal tissue (pink). Sequencing the genome of T. vaginalis has given the researchers gory reading material on some of the pathogen's foul habits. The parasite latches onto vaginal tissue and forms tendril-like projections into it. The pathogen also secretes a series of proteins which destroy the vaginal epithelial cells, the cells that make up the vaginal tissue surface.




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