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Free e-Book Offers Tips for Reducing Breast Cancer Risk at Nearly Any Age​​​​​​​​​​​​​

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A free e-book provides practical, science-based advice for lowering breast cancer risk at every stage of life. Written for a lay audience, “Together — Every Woman’s Guide to Preventing Breast Cancer” aims to help women improve their breast health and the breast health of their loved ones.

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Genetic Testing All Women for Breast Cancer Might Not Be Worth the Cost

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Women who are carriers of mutated BRCA genes are known to have a significantly higher risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers than those who don’t have the mutations. But a new study by UCLA faculty questions the value of screening for the genetic mutations in the general population—including those who do not have cancer or have no family history of the disease— because of the high cost.

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Exposure to Phthalates Could Be Linked to Pregnancy Loss

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A new study of more than 300 women suggests that exposure to certain phthalates — substances commonly used in food packaging, personal-care and other everyday products — could be associated with miscarriage, mostly between 5 and 13 weeks of pregnancy.

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Hysterectomy Can Be Safely Combined with Cosmetic Surgery for 'Hanging Abdomen'

For women undergoing hysterectomy, removal of "hanging" abdominal fat and skin—a cosmetic procedure called panniculectomy—can be performed at the same surgery without increasing the risk of complications, reports a study in the September issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

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Women with Hypertension in Pregnancy and Their Siblings Face Increased Risk of Heart Disease

• Compared with their sister(s) who had normal blood pressure during pregnancy, women who had hypertension in pregnancy were more likely to develop hypertension later in life. • Brothers and sisters of women who had high blood pressure during pregnancy were at increased risk of developing high blood pressure later in life. • Brothers, but not sisters, of women who had high blood pressure in pregnancy were also at increased risk of developing heart disease.

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Ovarian Cancer Survival Influenced by History of Oral Contraceptive Use

A history of oral contraceptive use and having at least one child increased longevity by nearly three years in patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, according to a Roswell Park Cancer Institute (RPCI) study recently published online ahead of print in the International Journal of Gynecological Cancer.

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Growth Hormone Reduces Risk of Osteoporosis Fractures in Older Women

For years after it was administered, growth hormone continued to reduce the risk of fractures and helped maintain bone density in postmenopausal women who had osteoporosis, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Breast Cancer Risk Score Impacts Use of Chemotherapy

A genetic test that helps predict whether some women’s breast cancer will recur might influence how chemotherapy is used, according to a study from Duke Medicine. The study found that low-risk patients who had the test appeared to opt for more treatment, and high-risk patients who were tested got less.

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Fertility Concerns Impact Breast Cancer Treatment Decisions

Concerns about fertility kept a third of young women with breast cancer from taking tamoxifen, despite its known benefit in reducing the risk of breast cancer coming back.

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Study Documents Extent of Unexpected Sexual Consequences for Young Women Who Drink Alcohol

In-depth interviews conducted by researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine of 20 young women attending an urban sexually transmitted disease clinic have documented a variety of unexpected, unintended sexual encounters linked to their alcohol use before sex occurs.

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Top Stories 18 August 2015

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New Method Could Detect Blood Clots Anywhere in the Body with a Single Scan

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A blood clot can potentially trigger heart attacks, strokes and other medical emergencies. Treatment requires finding its exact location, but current techniques can only look at one part of the body at once. Now, researchers are reporting a method, tested in rats, that may someday allow physicians to quickly scan the entire body for a blood clot. The team will describe their approach at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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Color-Changing Polymer May Signal Traumatic Brain Injuries in Soldiers, Athletes (Video)

A bomb blast or a rough tackle can inflict serious brain damage. Yet at the time of impact, these injuries are often invisible. To detect head trauma immediately, a team of researchers has developed a polymer-based material that changes colors depending on how hard it is hit. The goal is to someday incorporate this material into protective headgear. They will describe their approach at the 250th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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Long-Term Ovarian Cancer Survival Higher Than Thought

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Combing data collected on thousands of California ovarian cancer patients, UC Davis researchers have determined that almost one-third survived at least 10 years after diagnosis.

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Survey Shows That New Moms Are Concerned About Beginning Breastfeeding

Beginning breastfeeding is the second-greatest concern of pregnant moms, ranked just after proper recovery from labor and birth, said more than 1,000 survey participants of Healthy Mom&Baby, a consumer magazine (print and online) from the mother/baby nurses of the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric & Neonatal Nurses (AWHONN).

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Cures for PTSD Often Remain Elusive for War Veterans

Our nation’s veterans continue to suffer emotional and psychological effects of war—some for decades. And while there has been greater attention directed recently toward post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and more veterans are seeking help, current psychotherapy treatments are less than optimal, according to a new narrative review led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center and publishing in the August 4, 2015 issue of JAMA.

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High Rates of Violence, HIV Infection for Adolescents in Sex Trade on U.S.-Mexico Border

Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine report that more than one in four female sex workers in two Mexican cities on the U.S. border entered the sex trade younger than age 18; one in eight before their 16th birthday. These women were more than three times more likely to become infected with HIV than those who started sex work as adults.

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Nurse Survey Examines Factors Related to Compassion Fatigue, Compassion Satisfaction

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An article in the AACN journal, Critical Care Nurse, describes the demographic, unit and organizational factors that may contribute to nurses’ professional quality of life. It also establishes the prevalence of compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue in adult, pediatric and neonatal critical care nurses.

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New Study Identifies Promising Treatment for Military Veterans with PTSD

Attention control training reduces attention bias variability, improves PTSD symptoms

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Depressed Females Have Over-Active Glutamate Receptor Gene

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Numerous genes that regulate the activity of a neurotransmitter in the brain have been found to be abundant in brain tissue of depressed females, according to research at the University of Illinois at Chicago.