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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Mar-2017 4:00 PM EDT

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Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences, USU, Usuhs, Uniformed Services University, Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, mild trau, Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center , DVBIC, Preventive Medicine, Dr. Ann Scher, Dr. Karen Schwab, Concussion, Neurology, AAN, American Academy Of Neurology, post-deployment

Study Sheds Light on Prognosis of mTBI Symptoms for Returning Soldiers

Nearly 50 percent of recently-deployed Soldiers who sustained a mild traumatic brain injury reported post-concussive symptoms – like headaches, sleep disturbance, and forgetfulness – three months after returning from deployment, according to a study published March 17 in Neurology by researchers at the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USU), and the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center.

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New Biomarker Identifies Children at Risk of Poor Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury

Speed of signaling between brain's hemispheres an indication of damage to white matter; may help to identify youths at risk of cognitive decline

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Mackenzie Cervenka, Ketogenic, Epilepsy, Seizure, a coma, Diet

Ketogenic Diet Shown Safe and Effective Option for Some with Rare and Severest Form of Epilepsy

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In a small phase I and II clinical trial, Johns Hopkins researchers and colleagues elsewhere found that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet was a safe and effective treatment option for the majority of adults experiencing a relatively rare, often fatal and always severe form of epilepsy marked by prolonged seizures that require medically induced comas to prevent them from further damaging the body and the brain.

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Epilelpsy, Seizures, fMRI, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

UAB Leads Effort to Set Guidelines for fMRI Use in Epilepsy Surgery

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The first set of guidelines for the use of fMRI in pre-surgical evaluation of patients with epilepsy have been published in Neurology. The seven-year effort was conducted by a committee commissioned by AAN and led by UAB's Jerzy Szaflarski, M.D., Ph.D.

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Neurology, Parkinson Disease

For Welders, Parkinson-Like Symptoms Get Worse with Exposure

Welders can develop Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms that may get worse the longer and more they are exposed to the chemical element manganese from welding fumes, according to a study published in the December 28, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Parkinsonism, Welding, welders, Manganese

Low Levels of Manganese in Welding Fumes Linked to Neurological Problems

Welders exposed to airborne manganese at estimated levels well under federal safety standards develop neurological problems, according to a study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Current safety standards may not adequately protect welders from the dangers of the job.

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Falls, Aging, Brain, Aging Brain, Cognitive, Fall risk, Brain Imaging, walking while talking

Brain Activity May Predict Risk of Falls in Older Adults

Falls are the leading cause of fatal and non-fatal injuries among older Americans and all too often lead to physical decline and loss of independence. Now, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found that measuring the brain activity of healthy older adults while they’re walking and talking can predict their risk of falling. Their research is published today in the online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Vitamin D Status in Newborns and Risk of MS in Later Life

Babies born with low levels of vitamin D may be more likely to develop multiple sclerosis (MS) later in life than babies with higher levels of vitamin D, according to a study published in the November 30, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

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Bidmc, Beth Israel Deaconess, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Parkinson Disease, Cognitive Deficits, Orthostatic Hypotension

Standing Up May Unmask Cognitive Deficits in Patients with Parkinson’s

This study shows that when patients with PD experience a drop in blood pressure upon standing up – a condition known as orthostatic hypotension (OH) – they exhibit significant cognitive deficits. These deficits reverse when the individual lies down and their blood pressure returns to normal. As a result, these findings are important as clinical providers might miss an important target for intervention when not considering OH as a contributor to cognitive impairment.







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