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Chemical Disguise Transforms RNAi Drug Delivery

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Researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have developed a way to chemically disguise RNAi drugs so that they are able to enter cells. Once inside, cellular machinery converts these disguised drug precursors — called siRNNs — into active RNAi drugs.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 23-Nov-2014 7:00 PM EST

Medicine

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Regenerative Medicine Could Hold Next Steps in Treating Foot and Leg Ulcers

New and more effective treatments for diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) and venous leg ulcers (VLUs) are sorely needed. One of the today’s most promising approaches harnesses regenerative medicine, specifically cell therapy. Israel-based Macrocure Ltd.’s lead product, CureXcell™, harnesses living white blood cells, including macrophages, neutrophils and lymphocytes, that are crucial to initiating, promoting and completing the process of cellular regeneration and wound healing for both of these conditions.

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Synthetic Lethality Offers a New Approach to Kill Tumor Cells

The scientific community has made significant strides in recent years in identifying important genetic contributors to malignancy and developing therapeutic agents that target altered genes and proteins. A recent approach to treat cancer called synthetic lethality takes advantage of genetic alterations in cancer cells that make them more susceptible to certain drugs. Alan F. List, MD, president and CEO of Moffitt Cancer Center, co-authored an article on synthetic lethality featured in the October 30 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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GW Researcher Adapting Breakthrough Technologies to Combat Parasitic Worm Infections

Paul Brindley, Ph.D., professor of microbiology, immunology, and tropical medicine, and scientific director of the Research Center for Neglected Diseases of Poverty at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, co-authored a perspective in the journal Science, calling for researchers to adapt new technologies to research neglected parasitic flatworms.

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New Compounds Reduce Debilitating Inflammation

Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation in diseases such as ulcerative colitis and arthritis. The compounds appear to curtail inflammation-triggering signals from RIPK2. These findings appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

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First Step: From Human Cells to Tissue-Engineered Esophagus

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In a first step toward future human therapies, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children’s Hospital Los Angeles have shown that esophageal tissue can be grown in vivo from both human and mouse cells.

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A Better Prosthesis: Sandia Invents Sensor to Learn About Fit; System to Make Fit Better

Sandia National Laboratories researcher Jason Wheeler has been working to make prostheses more comfortable in a twofold approach: sensors that detect how the prosthesis fits and a system to make the fit better. He points out it doesn't matter how high-tech a prosthesis is if it's not comfortable.

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Researchers Develop New Cells Meant to Form Blood Vessels, Treat Peripheral Artery Disease

Researchers have developed a technique to jump-start the body's systems for creating blood vessels, opening the door for potential new treatments for diseases whose impacts include amputation and blindness.

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‘Programmable’ Antibiotic Harnesses an Enzyme to Attack Drug-Resistant Microbes

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The multitude of microbes scientists have found populating the human body have good, bad and mostly mysterious implications for our health. But when something goes wrong, we defend ourselves with the undiscriminating brute force of traditional antibiotics, which wipe out everything at once, regardless of the consequences.

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