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Cow Gene Study Shows Why Most Clones Fail

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It has been 20 years since Dolly the sheep was successfully cloned in Scotland, but cloning mammals remains a challenge. A new study by researchers from the U.S. and France of gene expression in developing clones now shows why most cloned embryos likely fail.

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Ancient Enzyme Morphed Shape to Carry Out New Functions in Humans

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New research led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) reveals that a human enzyme has changed little from its days as a bacterial enzyme.

Medicine

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Less Satisfaction in Breast Cancer Patients Who Have Radiation and Implants, Personalized Cancer Vaccine for AML, Model to Predict if Chemotherapy Will Work for Aggressive Breast Cancer, and More in the Cancer News Source

Click here to go directly to the Cancer News Source

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Cancer, biomarkers, Lab-on-a-chip, Genomic, Blood Testing, Biomicrofluidics, Diagnostics, Molecular Biology, Hong Cai, Matthew Stott, Damla Ozcelik, Joshua W. Parks, Aaron R. Hawkins, Holger Schmidt

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 13-Dec-2016 11:00 AM EST

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How to Make a Motor Neuron

A team of scientists has uncovered details of the cellular mechanisms that control the direct programming of stem cells into motor neurons.

Medicine

Science

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Microorganisms, antibiotic resisistance, Bacterium, Soil Bacteria

Microorganisms Isolated in Cave Helps Researchers Understand the Origins of Antibiotic Resistance

Scientists examined one bacterium found 1,000 feet underground (called Paenibacillus) that demonstrated resistance to most antibiotics used today, including so-called ‘drugs of last resort’ such as daptomycin. These microorganisms have been isolated from the outside world for more than four million years within the cave.

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Biomedical

NUS Scientist Prof Barry Halliwell to Chair Singapore's Biomedical Research Council

Prominent research leader and biomedical scientist Professor Barry Halliwell will help to steer biomedical research efforts in Singapore at the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) from 1 January 2017.

Medicine

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Queen’s University Belfast Expert Leading €4m Bid to Reduce Impact of Chemicals on Long-Term Health

A Queen’s University Belfast expert is leading a €4m international initiative to investigate whether natural toxins and manmade chemicals are creating potentially dangerous mixtures that affect our natural hormones and cause major illnesses such as cancer, obesity, diabetes or infertility.

Medicine

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Blood Collection Tube, Cell-Free DNA, New Blood Collection Tube, NIPT, Genomic Dna, non invasive fetal testing, Circulating Tumor Cells, Patent, European Patent

Streck Announces European Patent for Blood Collection Tubes

The patent relates to the use of Streck’s proprietary Cell-Free DNA BCT CE product for the collection of samples to analyze fetal nucleic acid for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT).

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Triclosan, antibacterial resistance, FDA, Policy

Ban on Triclosan Shows Need for New Chemicals to Demonstrate Efficacy and Safety

A new commentary cautions that the Food and Drug Administration’s ban on triclosan and 18 other biocidal chemicals that promote antibiotic resistance is only a starting point. Triclosan’s long-term impact, as well the risks substitute chemicals may pose, must also be addressed.

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Jante Robishaw, Biomedical Science, Research, Research Administration, National Insitutes of Health, Genomics

Janet Robishaw, Ph.D., Appointed as Chair of FAU's Department of Biomedical Sciences

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FAU's Schmidt College of Medicine recently appointed Janet Robishaw, Ph.D., as chair of the Department of Biomedical Sciences. Robishaw, an accomplished functional and translational genomics researcher with 30 years of sustained federal funding from the NIH, comes to FAU from Geisinger Health System in central Pennsylvania.

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aphrodisiac, Bacterium, Vibrio, choanoflagellate, S. rosetta, mating swarm, Eukaryotes, regulate mating , Animals, Evolution

Bacteria Produce Aphrodisiac That Sets Off Protozoan Mating Swarm

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Demonstration that bacteria can drive mating in eukaryotes raises possibility that environmental bacteria or bacterial symbionts may influence mating in animals

Medicine

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NIH, Venom, Spider, Halloween, pain, Evolution, venome, Antivenom

Exploring the Evolution of Spider Venom to Improve Human Health

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More than 46,000 species of spiders creepy crawl across the globe. Each one produces a venom composed of an average of 500 distinct toxins, putting the conservative estimate of unique venom compounds at more than 22 million. Researchers are studying these toxins to increase our understanding of the evolution of spider venom and contribute to the development of new medicines, anti-venoms and research tools.

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Bethlehem Star May Not Be a Star After All, The "Eye" of Majoranas, Cloud in a Box, and MORE in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

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Technology, Education, Science, College, hackathon, Entrepreneur

Students Create Innovative Prototypes at Cal State LA Biohack

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Marathon event highlights coding and biotech skills to develop solutions related to food, agriculture and healthcare technology

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bioenergy crops, agave, crassulacean acid metabolism, CAM, Photosynthesis, Climate Change, water-use efficiency, drought-resistant crops, genetic behavior, Molecular Biology

New Study of Water-Saving Plants Advances Efforts to Develop Drought-Resistant Crops

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As part of an effort to develop drought-resistant food and bioenergy crops, scientists at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered the genetic and metabolic mechanisms that allow certain plants to conserve water and thrive in semi-arid climates.

Medicine

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Cells, Self Repair, Cells Self Repair, Geneticist, 2017 Breakthrough Prize, Harvard Medical School, Stephen J. Elledge , DNA, Biology

Geneticist Stephen J. Elledge Wins Breakthrough Prize

Stephen Elledge, the Gregor Mendel Professor of Genetics and of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, has been named a 2017 recipient of the Breakthrough Prize, which recognizes paradigm-shifting discoveries in the life sciences, physics and mathematics.  Elledge is being honored for his wide-ranging contributions across multiple fields in biology.

Medicine

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Case Western Reserve University, case school of engineering, Case Western Reserve School of Medicine

Filling Need for Fast and Accurate Assessment of Blood’s Ability to Clot

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Case Western Reserve University researchers have developed a portable sensor that can assess the clotting ability of a person’s blood 95 times faster than current methods—using only a single drop of blood.

Medicine

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A Bacterial Aphrodisiac, Amyloids Protecting Dormant Eggs and Zika’s Cellular Damage Among Top Honor Cell Biology Picks at ASCB 201

ASCB names 10 "Novel & Newsworthy" Honor abstracts out of 1263 being presented in San Francisco, Dec. 3-7

Medicine

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Acute Myeloid Leukemia

CPX-351 Improves Survival Following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant in Older High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients, Says Moffitt Cancer Center Physician

Analysis of a phase 3 trial shows that older patients with high-risk or secondary AML, who received initial treatment with CPX-351, had improved survival following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant, when compared with patients who received standard 7+3 cytarabine and daunorubicin as initial therapy.







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