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Life

Education

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Students, Bioengineering, Compeition, Tuberculosis, Sepsis, Cervical Cancer, central line, Pancreatitis

NIH Announces Winners of Public-Private Undergraduate Biomedical Engineering Design Competition

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In a nation-wide competition, six teams of undergraduate engineering students produced prize-winning designs for technological advances to improve human health. The Design by Biomedical Undergraduate Teams (DEBUT) Challenge winning teams designed tools for a myriad of health care challenges, including diagnosing tuberculosis (TB) in children and a safer alternative for central venous catheter placements.

Medicine

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Nanoparticle That Mimics Salmonella Counteracts Chemotherapy Resistance, Protein’s Role in Cell Division, A Novel MRI Method, and MORE in the Cancer News Source

Click here to go directly to the Cancer News Source

Medicine

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Diabetes, IVD, intevertebral disc degeneration, Type 2 Diabetes, Diet, age, high-fat, processed foods, Deepak Vashishth, James Iatridis, Rensselaer, Biotechnology

Diet and Back Pain: What’s the Link?

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In a collaboration between Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, researchers are exploring the link between diet, obesity-linked Type 2 diabetes, and intervertebral disc degeneration.

Science

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Biomedical Engineering, Imaging, Robotics, electrical and computer engineering, Medical Imaging

MIT Technology Review Honors Johns Hopkins Engineer as a Top Young Innovator

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Muyinatu A. Lediju Bell, a Johns Hopkins engineering faculty member who designs medical imaging systems that link light, sound and robotics to produce clearer pictures, was honored today by MIT Technology Review, which placed her on its 2016 list of 35 Innovators Under 35. The list annually spotlights the nation’s most promising young scientists.

Science

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Climate Change, Global Warming, Biofuels, Ethanol, Energy, FUEL, Agriculture, Enviroment

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 25-Aug-2016 8:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Ut Southwestern, utsw, Ut Southwestern Medical Center, Prostate Cancer, prostate tissue, zinc, MRI, MRI techniq, Biomarker, Diagnostic

Novel MRI Technique Distinguishes Healthy Prostate Tissue From Cancer Using Zinc

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A novel MRI method that detects low levels of zinc ion can help distinguish healthy prostate tissue from cancer, UT Southwestern Medical Center radiologists have determined.

Science

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Michigan Tech, PIRE, NSF, National Science Foundation

Bioenergy Across the Americas

To solve complex global challenges, like the social and environmental impacts of bioenergy development, researchers turn to PIRE. That stands for Partnership in International Research and Education and is a program through the National Science Foundation.

Medicine

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Stroke, neurological damage, Stem Cell, Biotechnology, Brain Damage, Disability After Stroke

Hope for Reversing Stroke-Induced Long-Term Disability

Permanent brain damage from a stroke may be reversible thanks to a developing therapeutic technique. The novel approach combines transplanted human stem cells with a special protein that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration already approved for clinical studies in new stroke patients.

Science

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cell boundary elongation, cell shape oscillation, tension estimation, actomyosin, vinculin, Drosophila dorsal closure

Elongation by Contraction

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Scientists from the Mechanobiology Institute at the National University of Singapore have discovered a new mechanism of cell boundary elongation. Elongation and contraction of the cell boundary is essential for directing changes in cell shape, which is required for the correct development of tissues and organs.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Neurochemistry), Biology (Biotechnology; Physiology), Medicine/Health (Addiction; Neurobiology), Social/Behavioral Science

Watching Thoughts — and Addiction — Form in the Brain

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More than a hundred years ago, Ivan Pavlov conducted what would become one of the most famous and influential psychology studies — he conditioned dogs to salivate at the ringing of a bell. Now, scientists are able to see in real time what happens in the brains of live animals during this classic experiment with a new technique. Ultimately, the approach could lead to a greater understanding of how we learn, and develop and break addictions.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Medicine/Health (Critical Care/Emergency Medicine; Sports Medicine [Trauma/Injury])

Nanoparticles That Speed Blood Clotting May Someday Save Lives

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Whether severe trauma occurs on the battlefield or the highway, saving lives often comes down to stopping the bleeding as quickly as possible. Many methods for controlling external bleeding exist, but at this point, only surgery can halt blood loss inside the body from injury to internal organs. Now, researchers have developed nanoparticles that congregate wherever injury occurs in the body to help it form blood clots, and they’ve validated these particles in test tubes and in vivo.

Medicine

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Stroke, Prevention, biomarkers, Brain, Aging, Neurology, American Academy Of Neurology, AAN

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Aug-2016 4:00 PM EDT

Science

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Biology, Biodiversity, Climate Change, Ecology and Environment, marine and freshwater biology, Fisheries and aquaculture, Earth Science

Mussel Flexing: Bivalve Save Drought-Stricken Marshes, Research Finds

As coastal ecosystems feel the heat of climate change worldwide, new research shows the humble mussel and marsh grass form an intimate interaction known as mutualism that benefits both partner species and may be critical to helping these ecosystems bounce back from extreme climatic events such as drought.

Medicine

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Tulane Univeristy, Stem Cells, National Science Foundation, chemical and biomolecular engineering

Tulane Professor Receives Grant to Improve Stem Cell Survival

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Kim O’Connor, a professor in Tulane University’s Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, received a three-year $599,638 grant from the National Science Foundation to study ways to improve the survival of mesenchymal stem cells once they are implanted in patients.

Medicine

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Health Policy, Health Care, Award Announcement, Clinical Practice, Public Health, Biomedical Research

New York Academy of Medicine Announces Its 2016 Awards Honoring Leaders in Health Policy, Public Health, Clinical Practice, and Research

The New York Academy of Medicine is proud to announce the recipients of its prestigious annual awards for distinguished contributions by individuals in health policy, public health, clinical practice, biomedical research and an individual who has made significant contributions to the Academy.

Science

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mammal populations, Living Fossil, Taxonomy, Evolution, Evolution Biology, popular science

On the Prowl for an Elusive Rodent Called ‘the Ultimate Pokémon’

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Researchers are on a real-life search for what one calls “the ultimate Pokémon”: Zenkerella, an elusive scaly-tailed squirrel that has never been spotted alive by scientists. However, biologists recently found three newly dead specimens that hint at how the “living fossil” has evolved over the past 49 million years.

Medicine

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MRI, Imaging, MRI Imaging, scanners, Biotech

New MRI Technique Sheds Technology’s Longtime Limits

A new technology creates images resolved enough to enable consistent diagnoses across populations for the first time.

Science

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Biomechanics & Biophysics, Biomedical Engineering, Environmental Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology, Nanotechnology, Micromachines/Nanotechnology, Pharmaceutical And Combinatorial Chemistry

Nanoribbons in Solutions Mimic Nature

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Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) bend and twist easily in solution, making them adaptable for biological uses like DNA analysis, drug delivery and biomimetic applications, according to scientists at Rice University.

Science

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Fungi, Genomics, Energy, Department of Energy (DOE), DOE Office of Science, Biotechnology, Bioenergy

Expanding the Stable of Workhorse Yeasts

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So far industry has only harnessed a fraction of the yeast diversity available for biotechnological applications, including biofuel production. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a team led by DOE Joint Genome Institute researchers aims to help boost the use of a wider range of yeasts.

Science

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RNA, Ribozyme, DNA, Protein, Trasncription, RNA replication, RNA tran, polymerase ribozyme

TSRI Scientists Take Big Step Toward Recreating Primordial ‘RNA World’ of 4 Billion Years Ago

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have created a ribozyme that can basically serve both to amplify genetic information and generate functional molecules, a big step toward the laboratory re-creation of the “RNA world,” generally believed to have preceded modern life forms based on DNA and proteins.







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