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Artificial Blood Vessels Developed in the Lab Can Grow with the Recipient

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In a groundbreaking new study led by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers, artificial blood vessels bioengineered in the lab and implanted in young lambs are capable of growth within the recipient. If confirmed in humans, these new vessel grafts would prevent the need for repeated surgeries in some children with congenital heart defects.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Memristor, bioelectronics, Neuroscience, Neuroprosthetics

‘Missing Link’ Found in the Development of Bioelectronic Medicines

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New research, led by the University of Southampton, has demonstrated that a nanoscale device, called a memristor, could be the ‘missing link’ in the development of implants that use electrical signals from the brain to help treat medical conditions.

Science

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World's Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector, What to Expect From the Coming Quantum Era and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

Science

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Biofuels, pilot plant, advanced biofuels, bio-oil, Biochar

Iowa State, Chevron Team Up to Develop Pilot Plant, Advance Biofuel Technology

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Iowa State engineers are working with Chevron U.S.A. to develop a pilot plant and study a biorenewables technology called solvent liquefaction. The technology produces a bio-oil that can be processed into fuels or chemicals and a biochar that can enrich soils.

Science

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Mitochondria, Proteins, Yeast, Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, Chemistry, Metabolism, Biochemistry

Yeast Knockouts Peel Back Secrets of Cell Protein Function

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To fill in the blanks on mitochondria, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison deleted 174 genes, one by one, in yeast. They then subjected the yeast to high-intensity mass spectrometry to measure unprecedented detail on thousands of metabolic products, including proteins, intermediate chemicals called metabolites, and lipids.

Science

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Anthrax, Toxin, Structural Biology, Lethal Factor

How the Anthrax Toxin Forms a Deadly “Conveyer Belt”

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Researchers have built a three-dimensional map of the anthrax toxin that may explain how it efficiently transfers its lethal components into the cytoplasm of infected cells. The study, “Structure of anthrax lethal toxin prepore complex suggests a pathway for efficient cell entry,” which will be published online September 26 ahead of print in The Journal of General Physiology, suggests that the bacterial protein acts as a “conveyer belt” that allows toxic enzymes to continuously stream across cell membranes.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, lightsource, Fossil, bird feathers, bird, Science, Biological Science, Chemistry, Catalysis, X-ray imaging

In Bird Feathers, Scientists Find Hints About Color of Extinct Animals

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In order to discover the true colors of ancient animals, scientists are using X-rays to closely examine the chemical details of modern bird feathers. The researchers were able to map elements that make up pigments responsible for red and black colors in feathers. They hope to use this information to find traces of the same pigments in fossil specimens of extinct animals, such as dinosaurs. This latest discovery means that scientists may be able to go beyond monochrome in their depictions of fossilized creatures, and make steps towards portraying their colors more accurately.

Medicine

Science

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Virginia Tech, ACS Chemical Biology, Fungus, Aspergillus Fumigatus, Drug Discovery, Virginia Tech Center for Drug Discovery

Researchers Find Fungus-Fighting Compound in Drug Discovery Center Library

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Researchers with the Virginia Tech Center for Drug Discovery have identified a compound that blocks the growth of a fungus that causes deadly lung infections and allergic reactions in people with compromised immune systems.

Medicine

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Laboratory Developed Procedures, senate hearing, Congressional Briefing, Precision Medicine, CLIA Regulations

Association for Molecular Pathology Appreciates Opportunity to Discuss with Congressional Leaders How Laboratory Developed Procedures Benefit Patient Care

The Association for Molecular Pathology (AMP), the premier global, non-profit organization serving molecular diagnostics professionals, recently participated in two events designed to help educate lawmakers and congressional staff about laboratory developed procedures (LDPs) and the vital role they play in precision medicine and patient care. Both the U.S. Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions (HELP) Hearing and the Co-hosted Congressional Briefing provided bipartisan forums for AMP leaders to discuss how LDPs are currently designed, validated, regulated, and used in a variety of clinical settings.

Medicine

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First Practical Guidelines for Research Antibody Validation Are the Goal at Scientific Workshop Hosted by GBSI Sept 25-27

Scientific Community to Tackle Reproducibility Standards in Antibody Research

Medicine

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NIH, Premature Babies, Infant, Preemie, Respiratory, Neurologic, Neonatal, Autonomic Nervous System, Biomarker

Lurie Children’s Receives NIH Support to Study How Control of Breathing Impacts Premature Babies’ Respiratory and Neurologic Outcomes

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Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago was selected to participate in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded Prematurity-Related Ventilatory Control (Pre-Vent) study consortium. Physicians and researchers at Lurie Children’s will partner with investigators from other leading national hospitals to expand knowledge of neurorespiratory maturation in premature infants. Lurie Children’s site-specific study will investigate how autonomic, neurologic control of breathing matures in infants born at less than 29 weeks of gestation.

Medicine

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Heart Attack, Heart Failure, Heart Disease, Biomedical Engineering, Stem Cells, Progenitor Cells

$8 Million Grant to Support Research to Repair Hearts with Bioengineered Patch

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To prevent heart failure and restore heart function, researchers will work to create a bioengineered, human heart-tissue patch that is large, standardized and highly functional. This preclinical work will be supported by a seven-year grant just awarded by the NHLBI.

Science

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Neuroscience, Biochemistry, monobodies, pharmaceutical development, Molecular Biophysics, Neurodevelopment

Researchers Describe Key Protein Structure and a Drug Prototype That Could Assist Therapeutic Development

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Researchers from the University of Chicago have described the three-dimensional, atomic structure of an important cell receptor molecule linked to the development of several diseases.

Medicine

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Tecfidera, dimethyl fumarate, multiple sclerosis, DMF, MS, Mechanism Of Action, T Cell, Immunology, Drug Development, Chemical Biology

TSRI Study Illuminates How Mystery MS Drug Works

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A study by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute has helped to de-mystify the molecular workings of the multiple sclerosis drug Tecfidera®. The drug is the most widely prescribed pill-based therapy for MS, but its biological mechanism remains mysterious.

Science

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Precision Medicine, Thyroid, nobel prize in Chemistry

Nobel Laureate Thomas R. Cech, Ph.D. To Deliver Plenary Lecture at American Thyroid Association Annual Meeting

Thomas R. Cech, Ph.D., a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and Distinguished Professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder, will present a Plenary Lecture entitled "Precision Medicine - From Iodine-131 to CRISPR Genome Editing" at the 86th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association (ATA), on September 23rd, in Denver, CO.

Science

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Plants, RNA, DNA, Epigenetic

New Insights Into “Plant Memories”

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A special stretch of ribonucleic acid (RNA) called COOLAIR is revealing its inner structure and function to scientists, displaying a striking resemblance to an RNA molecular machine, territory previously understood to be limited to the cells’ protein factory (the ‘ribosome’) and not a skill set given to mere strings of RNA.

Medicine

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AltaBioscience Announces UKAS Accreditation of New ‘Hormone Fingerprint’ Test: Application as an Aid to Diagnosis of Adrenal Cancer

A new analytical test has been launched in the UK that provides sensitive, specific and efficient predictive analysis of a rare form of cancer from a simple urine sample. The ACC steroid analysis service will be marketed by Birmingham-based AltaBioscience, which has an exclusive licence on this patented technology from the University of Birmingham.

Science

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Sensor, Cystic Fibrosis, ALS, Diagnoses Disease

A Low-Cost Sensor for Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis

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A new, inexpensive method for detecting salt concentrations in sweat or other bodily fluids has been developed by Penn State biomaterials scientists. The fluorescent sensor, derived from citric acid molecules, is highly sensitive and highly selective for chloride, the key diagnostic marker in cystic fibrosis

Medicine

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Endocrine Society, Congress, Congressional Briefing, Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals, Endocrine Disruptors, Toxicology, Endocrinology, Bisphenol A, chemical regulation

Congressional Briefing Warns of Dangers of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

To mark 25 years of research into chemicals that disrupt the body’s hormones, the Endocrine Society will sponsor a Congressional briefing Sept. 21 exploring the latest breakthroughs in the field.

Medicine

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Business

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GBSI, Antibody Validation, Antibody, Antibodies, irreproducibility, Irreproducible, Reproducibility, Freedman, Leonard Freedman, Leonard P. Freedman, PhD, Global Biological Standards Institute , Asilomar

GBSI’s Workshop Gathers 100+ Biomedical Research Experts at Asilomar to Develop the First Practical, Implementable Antibody Validation Guidelines

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Global Biological Standards Institute (GBSI) gathers 100+ biomedical research experts from around the world next week at the scientifically historic Asilomar Conference Grounds in California for a workshop to discuss, define and vote on the first detailed standardized guidelines for validating research antibodies. Antibody Validation: Standards, Policies, and Practices will build upon the conceptual framework published September 5, in Nature Methods, in order to establish practical, applicable and implementable antibody validation guidelines. A webcast press briefing will present broad consensus-based outcomes September 28. Follow along on Twitter with #AbValidate.







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