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Science

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RNA Biology, piRNA pathway

How Cells Hack Their Own Genes

Researchers at IMBA - Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences - unveil novel mechanism for gene expression.

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Chemists Get Step Closer to Replicating Nature with Assembly of New 3D Structures

A team of chemists has created a series of three-dimensional structures that take a step closer to resembling those found in nature. The work offers insights into how enzymes are properly assembled, or folded, which could enhance our understanding of a range of diseases that result from these misfolded proteins.

Medicine

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Arthritis, Treatment, Algae, brown algae, Biotechnology

Treating Arthritis with Algae

Researchers at ETH Zurich, Empa and the Norwegian research institute SINTEF are pursuing a new approach to treating arthritis. This is based on a polysaccharide, a long-chain sugar molecule, originating from brown algae. When chemically modified, this "alginate" reduces oxidative stress, has an anti-inflammatory effect in cell culture tests and suppresses the immune reaction against cartilage cells, thereby combating the causes of arthritis. The research is, however, still in its infancy.

Science

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Aug-2017 12:00 PM EDT

Science

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Nanoengineering, wearable electronic devices, biofuel cells, Batteries, wearables

Stretchable Biofuel Cells Extract Energy From Sweat to Power Wearable Devices

A team of engineers has developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from sweat and are capable of powering electronics, such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios. The biofuel cells generate 10 times more power per surface area than any existing wearable biofuel cells. The devices could be used to power a range of wearable devices.

Science

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Biofuel, Cyanobacteria, Sandia National Laboratories

Biofuels From Bacteria

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Can a group of three single-celled, algae-like organisms produce high quantities of sugar just right for making biofuels? Laboratory results indicate that they can. Sandia National Laboratories is helping Bay Area-based HelioBioSys understand whether these cyanobacteria can be grown large scale.

Science

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loon conservation, Translocation, LOON, Common Loon, Ricketts Conservation Foundation, Biodiversity Research Institute

BRI Announces Findings of Common Loon Translocation Study

Portland, ME—Biodiversity Research Institute (BRI) has confirmed today that the translocation of loon chicks from Maine to Massachusetts has resulted in at least one loon returning to its release lake. In its fifth year of a five-year initiative funded by the Ricketts Conservation Foundation, Restore the Call is the largest Common Loon conservation study ever conducted. Research efforts have focused in three key U.S. breeding population areas from the western mountains to the Atlantic seaboard.

Science

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Fusion Power, Engineering with a Side of Liberal Arts, Nanocrystal Networks for Artificial Intelligence, and More in the Engineering News Source

The latest research and features in the Newswise Engineering News Source

Science

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Nature Photonics

New Bioimaging Technique Is Fast and Economical

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A new approach to optical imaging makes it possible to quickly and economically monitor multiple molecular interactions in a large area of living tissue – such as an organ or a small animal; technology that could have applications in medical diagnosis, guided surgery, or pre-clinical drug testing.

Medicine

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Lassa virus, Science, Biological Science, structural molecular biology, X-ray science, X-ray Crystallogaphy, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Synchrotron, lightsource

Kathryn Hastie Wins Spicer Award for Lassa Virus Work at SLAC’s X-Ray Synchrotron

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Kathryn Hastie, staff scientist at The Scripps Research Institute, has spent the last decade studying how the deadly Lassa virus – which causes up to half a million cases of Lassa fever each year in West Africa – enters human cells via a cell surface receptor.







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