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Research in Rodents Suggests Potential for “in Body” Muscle Regeneration

What if repairing large segments of damaged muscle tissue was as simple as mobilizing the body’s stem cells to the site of the injury? New research in mice and rats, conducted at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center’s Institute for Regenerative Medicine, suggests that “in body” regeneration of muscle tissue might be possible by harnessing the body’s natural healing powers.

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Injected Bacteria Shrink Tumors in Rats, Dogs and Humans

A modified version of the Clostridium novyi (C. novyi-NT) bacterium can produce a strong and precisely targeted anti-tumor response in rats, dogs and now humans, according to a new report from Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers.

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Could Hemp Nanosheets Topple Graphene for Making the Ideal Supercapacitor?


As hemp makes a comeback in the U.S. after a decades-long ban on its cultivation, scientists are reporting that fibers from the plant can pack as much energy and power as graphene, long-touted as the model material for supercapacitors. They’re presenting their work, which a start-up company is working on scaling up, at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

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Innovations with Far-Reaching Potential for the Environment and Health 


The Kavli Foundation Lecture series features two prominent scientists: one in the booming area of ionic liquids, the other in medical materials. The former has made a novel compound with the potential to lower the energy it takes to capture carbon dioxide. The latter has engineered tissues and medical materials such as a stretchy glue that could transform surgery. They are presenting at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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Venom Gets Good Buzz as Potential Cancer-Fighter (Video)

Bee, snake or scorpion venom could form the basis of a new generation of cancer-fighting drugs, scientists will report here today. They have devised a method for targeting venom proteins specifically to malignant cells while sparing healthy ones, reduces or eliminates side effects that the toxins would otherwise cause. Their study is part of the 248th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

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On the Frontiers of Cyborg Science 


Cyborg technology is bringing us real-life electronic skin, prosthetics and ultra-flexible circuits. Now taking this human-machine concept to an unprecedented level, pioneering scientists are working on the seamless marriage between electronics and brain signaling with the potential to transform our understanding of how the brain works — and how to treat its most devastating diseases. Their presentation is taking place at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

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Pregnant Women and Fetuses Exposed to Antibacterial Compounds Face Potential Health Risks 


As the Food and Drug Administration mulls over whether to rein in the use of common antibacterial compounds that are causing growing concern among environmental health experts, scientists are reporting today that many pregnant women and their fetuses are being exposed to these substances. They will present their work at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

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Like Cling Wrap, New Biomaterial Can Coat Tricky Burn Wounds and Block Out Infection


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Wrapping wound dressings around fingers and toes can be tricky, but for burn victims, guarding them against infection is critical. Today, scientists are reporting the development of novel, ultrathin coatings called nanosheets that can cling to the body’s most difficult-to-protect contours and keep bacteria at bay. They’re speaking about their materials, which they’ve tested on mice, at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society.

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Single-Cell Analysis Holds Promise for Stem Cell and Cancer Research

UC San Francisco researchers have identified cells’ unique features within the developing human brain, using the latest technologies for analyzing gene activity in individual cells, and have demonstrated that large-scale cell surveys can be done much more efficiently and cheaply than was previously thought possible.

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Guo 'Revolution' Biomotor Discovered in Many Bacteria and Viruses

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Scientists at the University of Kentucky, led by nano-biotechnologist Peixuan Guo, have reported the discovery of a new, third class of biomotor, unique in that it uses a "revolution without rotation" mechanism. Recently, Guo's team reported that these revolution biomotors are widespread among many bacteria and viruses.

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