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Modeling of the Universe with Einstein; Learning About the Future From the Distant Past; Particle Zoo in a Quantum Computer and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Jun-2016 12:00 AM EDT

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Novel Controller Allows Video Gamer Who Lacks Hands to Compete with His Feet

Engineering graduate students, one of whom lost his hands to meningitis, design and build a foot-activated video game controller.

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Johns Hopkins Students Design Ebola Protection Suit Improvements

Johns Hopkins University engineering students working to develop a better suit to protect health care workers in Ebola outbreaks have developed prototypes for a more comfortable hood and face mask that make breathing easier, and for a battery-powered system that curbs humidity in the suit.

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Get a clue: Biochemist studies fruit fly to understand Parkinson's disease, muscle wasting

By studying the fruit fly, Kansas State University researchers have found a connection between a gene called clueless and genes that cause Parkinson's disease.

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Scientists Glimpse Why Life Can’t Happen Without Water

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Scientists are getting closer to directly observing how and why water is essential to life as we know it.

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Bacteria Hairs Make Excellent Electrical Wires

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Scientists found that the electronic arrangement and the small molecular separation distances give bacterial pili an electrical conductivity comparable to that of copper, valuable insights for those interested in eventually constructing non-toxic, nanoscale sources of electricity.

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Research Examines Obstacles to Making Biofuel From Perennial Plants

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A University of Arkansas chemistry professor has received a $400,000 award from the National Science Foundation to investigate a roadblock in the harvesting of biomass from perennial plants for the purpose of creating a source of renewable energy.

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Predicting Disease Outbreaks Using Environmental Changes

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A model that predicts outbreaks of zoonotic diseases -- those originating in livestock or wildlife such as Ebola and Zika -- based on changes in climate, population growth and land use has been developed by a UCL-led team of researchers.

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Challenges of Custom-Engineering Living Tissue, Marriage Could Improve Heart Attack Survival, Bleeding Hearts Predict Future Heart Failure, and More in the Cardiovascular Health News Source

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Tufts Microbiologist Cecilia A. Silva-Valenzuela, Ph.D., Named Pew Latin American Fellow

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Tufts University microbiologist Cecilia A. Silva-Valenzuela, Ph.D., has been named one of ten Latin American Fellows in the Biomedical Sciences by The Pew Charitable Trusts. Working in Andy Camilli’s lab, she is studying the use of phages to help stop the spread of cholera.

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Increased Bioenergy Demand to Put Pressure on Forests

A new study shows that increased demand for biomass for energy in Europe, through intensified use of existing forests, could lead to loss of biodiversity and high competition for wood between sectors, and proposes policies to help preserve biodiversity while also limiting greenhouse gas emissions.

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Switched-on Salmonella: Fluid Forces Guide Disease Traits of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria

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Once inside the human body, infectious microbes like Salmonella face a fluid situation. They live in a watery world, surrounded by liquid continually flowing over and abrading their cell surfaces--a property known as fluid shear.

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Chemistry Lessons From Bacteria May Improve Biofuel Production

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A new UW-Madison analysis of a group of bacteria called Streptomyces reveals the way some strains of the microbe developed advanced abilities to tear up cellulose, and points out more efficient ways we might mimic those abilities to make fuel from otherwise unusable plant material.

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New Cheap Method of Surveying Landscapes Can Capture Environmental Change

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Cheap cameras on drones can be used to measure environmental change which affects billions of people around the world, new research from the University of Exeter shows.

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Laboratory Breakthrough May Lead to Improved X-Ray Spectrometers

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Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute’s Swiss Light Source in Villigen, Switzerland, have developed a new design for X-ray spectrometers that eschews a commonly utilized component to lowers overall production costs and increase the efficiency of x-ray flux, which may lead to faster acquisition times for sample imaging and increased efficiency for the system. This is essential for biological samples which may be damaged by continued x-ray exposure.

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Scientists Receive $3.5 Million From NIH to Study Drug Resistance in a Global Parasitic Disease

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Dr. Tim Anderson at Texas Biomedical Research Institute and Dr. Phil LoVerde at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have been awarded a $3.5 million grant over the next five years by the National Institutes of Health to understand the genetic changes in the schistosome parasite that lead to drug resistance.

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Origami Ninja Star Inspires New Battery Design

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A new disposable battery that folds like an origami ninja star could power biosensors and other small devices for use in challenging field conditions, says an engineer at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Seokheun “Sean” Choi, assistant professor of computer and electrical engineering at Binghamton University, along with two of his students, developed the device, a microbial fuel cell that runs on the bacteria available in a few drops of dirty water. They report on their invention in a new paper published online in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics.

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Distinguishing Deadly Staph Bacteria From Harmless Strains

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To better understand the pathogenic bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and develop more effective treatments, University of California San Diego researchers examined the Staph “pan-genome” — the genomes of 64 different strains that differ in where they live, the types of hosts they infect and their antibiotic resistance profiles. This effort, published June 6 by PNAS, places all Staph genes into one of two categories: the core genome or the dispensable genome.

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This Desert Moss Has Developed the Ultimate Water Collection Toolkit

Finding water in the desert is a relatively easy task for a species of moss that seems to flourish in even the most arid regions. That's according to a new study by a team of scientists and engineers who wanted to understand how Syntrichia caninervis succeeds despite its limited and inconsistent water supplies.