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Embargo will expire:
24-Jul-2018 9:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
17-Jul-2018 10:50 AM EDT

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Article ID: 696660

Immune Cells That Create and Sustain Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease Identified

University of Alabama at Birmingham

In preclinical experiments, Laurie Harrington and colleagues have discovered a subset of immune cells that create and sustain chronic inflammatory bowel disease. These cells could become potential therapeutic targets to ameliorate or cure Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis.

Released:
26-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    25-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696245

Researchers Identify Brain Cells Responsible for Removing Damaged Neurons After Injury

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have discovered that microglia, specialized immune cells in the brain, play a key role in clearing dead material after brain injury. The study, which will be published June 25 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that microglia gobble up the remnants of injured neurons, which could prevent the damage from spreading to neighboring neurons and causing more extensive neurodegeneration.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 9:00 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    17-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694507

Single Surface Protein Boosts Multiple Oncogenic Pathways in Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Study Reveals

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have discovered that a signaling protein elevated in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) plays a much wider role in the disease than previously thought. The study, which will be published May 17 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, raises hopes that current efforts to target this signaling protein could be a successful strategy to treat AML and other blood cancers.

Released:
14-May-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    16-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 694259

Cell Type Switch Helps Colon Cancer Evade Treatment, Study Suggests

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in Germany have discovered that colon cancers are often resistant to existing drug treatments because they are composed of two different cell types that can replace each other when one cell type is killed. The study, which will be published May 16 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that combination therapies targeting both cell types at once may be more effective at treating colorectal cancer, the third highest cause of cancer-related death in the United States.

Released:
9-May-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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    4-May-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693698

Osteoporosis Drug Could Be Used to Treat Aggressive Form of Breast Cancer, Researchers Say

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in China have discovered that an enzyme called UGT8 drives the progression of basal-like breast cancer, an aggressive form of the disease that is largely untreatable. But the study, which will be published May 4 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, reveals that the widely used osteoporosis drug zoledronic acid inhibits UGT8 and prevents the spread of basal-like breast cancer in mice, suggesting that this drug could also be used to treat the disease in humans.

Released:
30-Apr-2018 9:40 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    27-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 693266

Multiple Sclerosis Drug Could Reduce Painful Side Effects of Common Cancer Treatment, Researchers Suggest

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered why many multiple myeloma patients experience severe pain when treated with the anticancer drug bortezomib. The study, which will be published April 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that a drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis could mitigate this effect, allowing myeloma patients to successfully complete their treatment and relieving the pain of myeloma survivors.

Released:
23-Apr-2018 9:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    7-Mar-2018 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 690247

Researchers Identify New Drugs That Could Help Prevent Hearing Loss

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers from St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital have discovered that inhibiting an enzyme called cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) protects mice and rats from noise- or drug-induced hearing loss. The study, which will be published March 7 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that CDK2 inhibitors prevent the death of inner ear cells, which has the potential to save the hearing of millions of people around the world.

Released:
28-Feb-2018 10:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Mar-2018 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 690244

How Tattoos Are Maintained by Macrophages Could Be Key to Improving Their Removal

The Rockefeller University Press

Researchers in France have discovered that, though a tattoo may be forever, the skin cells that carry the tattoo pigment are not. Instead, the researchers say, the cells can pass on the pigment to new cells when they die. The study, which will be published March 6 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests ways to improve the ability of laser surgery to remove unwanted tattoos.

Released:
28-Feb-2018 9:05 AM EST
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  • Embargo expired:
    6-Mar-2018 9:00 AM EST

Article ID: 690436

Preventing Exhaustion in Immune Cells Boosts Immunotherapy in Mice

Health Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh

Immunotherapy does not work for a majority of cancer patients. Preventing or reversing metabolic exhaustion in cancer-killing T-cells could boost its effectiveness.

Released:
2-Mar-2018 12:40 PM EST
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