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Journal of Experimental Medicine

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McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), Claudio Soto Ph.D., Misfolded Protein Diseases, Prion Diseases, Mad Cow Disease, Creutzfeldt Jacob Disease, Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, Infectious, Mitchell Center

UTHealth Research: Misfolded Form of Pancreatic Protein Could Induce Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

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The symptoms of type 2 diabetes can be induced by a misfolded form of a pancreatic protein and possibly be transmitted by a mechanism similar to prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (mad cow disease), according to researchers from McGovern Medical School at UTHealth Houston.

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Type 2 Diabetes, Pancreas, Medicine & Health

Researchers Demonstrate Transmission of Diabetes Symptoms via Prion-Like Mechanism

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Researchers from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston have discovered that the symptoms of diabetes can be induced by a misfolded form of a pancreatic protein. The findings, which are reported in a paper to be published August 1 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, raise the possibility that type 2 diabetes can be transmitted by a mechanism similar to prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (mad cow disease).

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human antibody therapy, therapeutic antibodies, Biotechnology, Vaccine Development

Researchers Develop New Method to Generate Human Antibodies

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An international team of scientists has developed a method to rapidly produce specific human antibodies in the laboratory. The technique, which will be described in a paper to be published July 24 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, could speed the production of antibodies to treat a wide range of diseases and facilitate the development of new vaccines.

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AIDS, HIV, Autoimmune Disease, Hiv Vaccine, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), Immunology

Barrier to Autoimmune Disease May Open Door to HIV, Study Suggests

Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine have discovered that a process that protects the body from autoimmune disease also prevents the immune system from generating antibodies that can neutralize the HIV-1 virus. The findings, which will be published July 11 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, might be considered by scientists trying to develop a vaccine that can stimulate the production of these neutralizing antibodies.

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zika, Autophagy, microcephaly , hydroxycholoroquine , fetal infection

Malaria drug protects fetuses from Zika infection

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A drug that modulates the placenta’s normal barrier to infection protects the fetus from Zika infection, according to a study of pregnant mice from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The drug is already used in pregnant women to treat malaria.

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Listeria Monocytogenes, Cancer, Pregnancy Health, Microbiome, Gut Bacteria and Health, Probiotics

Gut Bacteria Could Protect Cancer Patients and Pregnant Women From Listeria, Study Suggests

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Researchers at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York have discovered that bacteria living in the gut provide a first line of defense against severe Listeria infections. The study, which will be published June 6 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that providing these bacteria in the form of probiotics could protect individuals who are particularly susceptible to Listeria, including pregnant women and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

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Robert Siliciano, Johns Hopkins, HIV, Immune Cells, Therapy, latent HIV, Reservoirs, CD4+ T

Reservoirs of Latent HIV Can Grow Despite Effective Therapy, Study Shows

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report new evidence that immune cells infected with a latent form of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are able to proliferate, replenishing the reservoir of virus that is resistant to antiretroviral drug therapy. Although HIV can be controlled with therapy in most cases, the proliferation of such reservoir cells pose a persistent barrier to developing a cure for HIV, researchers say.

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Heart Failure, G protein-coupled receptor , Drug Target, Cardiology, Chronic Heart Failure

Scientists Identify Protein Linked to Chronic Heart Failure

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Researchers in Japan have identified a receptor protein on the surface of heart cells that promotes chronic heart failure. The study, “Corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 2 exacerbates chronic cardiac dysfunction,” which will be published May 26 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that inhibiting this protein could help treat a disease that affects more than 20 million people worldwide.

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Inflamamatory Bowel Disease (Ibd), Crohn's Disease, Ulcerative Colitis, Microrna, inflammasome

Researchers Uncover Key Role for MicroRNA in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

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An international team of researchers has discovered that a microRNA produced by certain white blood cells can prevent excessive inflammation in the intestine. The study, “Myeloid-derived miR-223 regulates intestinal inflammation via repression of the NLRP3 inflammasome,” which will be published May 9 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, shows that synthetic versions of this microRNA can reduce intestinal inflammation in mice and suggests a new therapeutic approach to treating patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.

Medicine

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Autoimmune Disease, Autoimmunity, Lupus, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), Dermatomyositis, Interferons, Medical Technology, Diagnostics

Researchers Describe Ultrasensitive Detection of Protein Linked to Multiple Autoimmune Diseases

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Researchers in France have developed a new method that will allow doctors to detect minute amounts of a protein called interferon- in patient samples. The technique, which is described in the study “Detection of interferon- protein reveals differential levels and cellular sources in disease” published April 18 in The Journal of Experimental Medicine, will aid the diagnosis and treatment of numerous autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and dermatomyositis.







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