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memristors, Machine Learning, AI, Synapes

Researchers Build Artificial Synapse Capable of Autonomous Learning

Ferroelectric tunnel junctions show ability to make strong or weak connections and learn pattern recognition

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 1-May-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 1-May-2017 11:00 AM EDT

Medicine

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Linda Resar, Linda M. S. Resar, Stem Cells, Intestinal, Niche, Transgenic, HGMA1, Cancer, colon

Single Gene Encourages Growth of Intestinal Stem Cells, Supporting "Niche" Cells--and Cancer

A gene previously identified as critical for tumor growth in many human cancers also maintains intestinal stem cells and encourages the growth of cells that support them, according to results of a study led by Johns Hopkins researchers. The finding, reported in the Apr. 28 issue of Nature Communications, adds to evidence for the intimate link between stem cells and cancer, and advances prospects for regenerative medicine and cancer treatments.

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MARS, NASA, Space Exploration, Engineering, Materials Science

Engineers Investigate a Simple, No-Bake Recipe to Make Bricks From Martian Soil

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Explorers planning to settle on Mars might be able to turn the planet’s red soil into bricks without needing to use an oven or additional ingredients. Instead, they would just need to apply pressure to compact the soil—the equivalent of a blow from a hammer. These are the findings of a study published in Nature Scientific Reports on April 27, 2017. The study was authored by a team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and funded by NASA.

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2-D materials, Quantum Computers, Jing Xia

UCI’s New 2-D Materials Conduct Electricity Near the Speed of Light

Physicists at the University of California, Irvine and elsewhere have fabricated new two-dimensional materials with breakthrough electrical and magnetic attributes that could make them building blocks of future quantum computers and other advanced electronics.

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Materials Science, ferromagnetic materials

Berkeley Lab Scientists Discover New Atomically Layered, Thin Magnet

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Berkeley Lab scientists have found an unexpected magnetic property in a 2-D material. The new atomically thin, flat magnet could have major implications for a wide range of applications, such as nanoscale memory, spintronic devices, and magnetic sensors.

Medicine

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Jennifer Elisseeff, Senescent cells, Cartilage, UBX0101

Clearing Out Old Cells Could Extend Joint Health, Stop Osteoarthritis

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In a preclinical study in mice and human cells, researchers report that selectively removing old or 'senescent' cells from joints could stop and even reverse the progression of osteoarthritis.

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Neuropathies, Peripheral Nervous System, peripheral nerve sheath tumors, NF1, Nature Communications, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Myelin Sheath, Pediatrics, press release, press release distribution, n, News Media

HIPPO’s Molecular Balancing Act Helps Nerves Not Short Circuit

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Scientists report in Nature Communications it may be possible to therapeutically fine tune a constantly shifting balance of molecular signals to ensure the body’s peripheral nerves are insulated and functioning normally. In a study published April 26, they suggest this may be a way to treat neuropathies or prevent the development of peripheral nerve sheath tumors. They discovered genetic dysfunction in the HIPPO-TAZ/YAP and Gαs-protein feedback circuit disrupts the balanced formation of the protective myelin sheath.

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Ut Southwestern, Fatty Liver Disease, Obesity, Nafld, Pnpla3

Obesity Amplifies Genetic Risk of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

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An international study based at UT Southwestern Medical Center revealed a striking genetic-environmental interaction: Obesity significantly amplifies the effects of three gene variants that increase risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by different metabolic pathways.







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