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Newly Discovered Brain Cells Explain a Prosocial Effect of Oxytocin

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Oxytocin, the body’s natural love potion, helps couples fall in love, makes mothers bond with their babies, and encourages teams to work together. Now new research at Rockefeller University reveals a mechanism by which this prosocial hormone has its effect on interactions between the sexes, at least in certain situations. The key, it turns out, is a newly discovered class of brain cells.

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Teens Still Sending Naked Selfies

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A new study from the University of Utah confirms that substantial numbers of teens are sexting – sending and receiving explicit sexual images via cellphone. Though the behavior is widely studied, the potentially serious consequences of the practice led the researchers to more accurately measure how frequently teens are choosing to put themselves at risk in this fashion.

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Feeling Fatigued While Driving? Don’t Reach for Your iPod

Research has shown that drinking caffeinated beverages and listening to music are two popular fatigue-fighting measures that drivers take, but very few studies have tested the usefulness of those measures. New research evaluates which method, if either, can successfully combat driver fatigue.

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Sexting in Teens Linked to More Sexual Activity, Low Self-Esteem

Relatively few teens say they have engaged in sexting, but those who do may put themselves at sexual risk, finds a new study in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Mother’s Behavior Has Strong Effect on Cocaine-Exposed Children

It is not only prenatal drug exposure, but also conditions related to drug use that can influence negative behavior in children, according to a new study from the University at Buffalo’s Research Institute on Addictions.

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Preschoolers with Low Empathy at Risk for Continued Problems

A toddler who doesn't feel guilty after misbehaving or who is less affectionate or less responsive to affection from others might not raise a red flag to parents, but these behaviors may result in later behavior problems in 1st grade.

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Study: Birth Control Practices Vary by Social Class

A new study of couples living together unmarried finds that the working class and the middle class have significantly different attitudes and approaches toward birth control, helping to explain why unwed births are far less common among the college-educated than their less-educated counterparts. In interviews conducted by researchers from the University of Indianapolis and Cornell University, cohabiting couples in the middle class are more likely to discuss contraception, use effective methods consistently, use two or more methods simultaneously and view childbearing as part of a greater sequence of events in their lives. UIndy's Dr. Amanda Miller is available for interviews on this and related topics.

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How Career Dreams are Born

A new study shows just what it takes to convince a person that she is qualified to achieve the career of her dreams.

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Who Are the Men and Boys Suffering From Anorexia?

A new study by researchers from the University of Montreal reveals the current state of knowledge about anorexia in men and boys. "Our results show that certain particularities can be identified in males, especially related to personality, gender identity, and sexual orientation", says Laurence Corbeil-Serre.

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New Study Out of Villanova University Finds Release of Violent Video Games May Actually Reduce Real-World Violence

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