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WIU Professor, Former FBI Agent's Latest Book, "The Like Switch," Provides Tips for How to Influence and Win People Over

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A Western Illinois University professor's new book covers techniques that individuals can use to can influence, attract and win people over. WIU School of Law Enforcement and Justice Administration Assistant Professor and former FBI Special Agent Jack Schafer's "The Like Switch," according to the publisher's website, "is a handbook filled with his proven strategies on how to instantly read people and influence how they perceive you…."

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Project to Reduce Violence in Panama City with Improved Parenting

University of Manchester researchers have piloted a parenting trial which aims to improve child behaviour in Panama City – the place with the eighth highest murder rate in the world.

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Squid-Inspired ‘Invisibility Stickers’ Could Help Soldiers Evade Detection in the Dark (Video)

Squid are the ultimate camouflage artists, blending almost flawlessly with their backgrounds so that unsuspecting prey can’t detect them. Using a protein that’s key to this process, scientists have designed “invisibility stickers” that could one day help soldiers disguise themselves, even when sought by enemies with tough-to-fool infrared cameras.

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Is Blood Really Thicker Than Water?

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The outcome of a duel between mathematical models supports the reigning theory of the genetics of altruism. Called inclusive fitness, it says altruism is competitive if it benefits relatives carrying the same gene as the selfless individual. Attacked by a Nature article published in 2010, it is defended by Washington University evolutionary biologist David Queller.

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Men’s Preference for Certain Body Types Has Evolutionary Roots

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A psychology study from The University of Texas at Austin sheds new light on today’s standards of beauty, attributing modern men’s preferences for women with a curvy backside to prehistoric influences.

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Location, Location, Location: Bike-Sharing Systems Need Revamp To Attract More Riders

A new study by University of Chicago Booth School of Business Assistant Professor Elena Belavina, INSEAD Professor of Sustainable Development Karan Girotra and INSEAD Ph.D. candidate Ashish Kabra found that it is possible for cities to increase ridership without spending more money on bikes or docking points—simply by redesigning the network.

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Breadth vs. Depth

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Whether it’s crossing disciplines, breaking down silos, or thinking outside the box, everyone’s talking about boundary spanning as the key to solving the world’s toughest problems. So why isn’t everyone doing it? A new study conducted by Tom Bateman, Professor of Management at the McIntire School of Commerce, and Andrew Hess, Assistant Professor of Business Administration at Washington & Lee University, offers some intriguing clues.

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Five Ways to Get More Helpful Feedback from Employees

Researchers have developed five tips for getting more useful employee responses

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Harder-to-Abuse OxyContin Doesn’t Stop Illicit Use

A reformulation of OxyContin that makes it less likely to be abused than the older formulation has curtailed the drug’s illicit use. But researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a significant percentage still abuse the drug despite package labeling that emphasizes its abuse-deterrent properties.

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Move Over Mozart: Study Shows Cats Prefer Their Own Beat

As more animal shelters, primate centers and zoos start to play music for their charges, it’s still not clear whether and how human music affects animals. Now, a study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison shows that while cats ignore our music, they are highly responsive to “music” written especially for them. The study is online at Applied Animal Behaviour Science.