Feature Channels

Behavioral Science

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Slow to Mature, Quick to Distract: ADHD Brain Study Finds Slower Development of Key Connections

Sripadacircle.jpg

A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Concept of Time May Predict Impulsive Behavior, Research Finds

New study finds that individuals with impulsive behaviors have poor timing abilities. Researchers hope this finding will lead to behavioral interventions for clinical disorders like substance abuse and obesity that are linked to impulsive behavior.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Sometimes, Adolescents Just Can't Resist

0386-1_revised_teenage_behavior_illustration_tilted2.jpg

A University of Iowa study finds teenagers are far more sensitive than adults to the immediate effect or reward of their behaviors. Even when a behavior is no longer in a teenager’s best interest to continue, they will because the effect of the reward is still there and lasts much longer in adolescents than in adults.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Diverse Neighborhoods May Help Infants’ Social Learning

Imitation1of4.jpg

Experiencing diverse communities by hearing different languages at the park, on a bus or in the grocery store may make babies more open-minded in their social learning, a new study finds.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Algorithms Reveal Forecasting Power of Tweets

Binghamton University and researchers at the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC), a division of Xerox Research used 500 million tweets to develop algorithms that not only paint a picture of everyday human dynamics, but can predict an individual's behavior hours in advance.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Your Parents Were Right: New Research Shows Importance of Saying Thank You

Saying thank you has been among the commonest of cultural civilities for centuries. Now new research offers the first evidence that expressions of gratitude go beyond mere etiquette and provide real social benefit.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Answering the Call for Hope

HopelinePhotobyNickRomanenkoRutgersUniversity.jpg

As the NJ Hopeline moves into its second year, the state’s suicide prevention hotline operated by Rutgers counts its success one call at a time.

View | Comment

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Keywords:

Reacting to Personal Setbacks: Do You Bounce Back or Give Up?

IMG_1364hi-res.jpg

Sometimes when people get upsetting news – such as a failing exam grade or a negative job review – they decide instantly to do better the next time. In other situations that are equally disappointing, the same people may feel inclined to just give up. How can similar setbacks produce such different reactions? It may come down to how much control we feel we have over what happened, according to new research from Rutgers University-Newark. The study, published in the journal Neuron, also finds that when these setbacks occur, the level of control we perceive may even determine which of two distinct parts of the brain will handle the crisis.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Cocaine Rewires the Brain: New Study to Unlock Keys That Could Disrupt Addiction

David-DietzRt.jpg

Why do cocaine addicts relapse after months or years of abstinence? The National Institute on Drug Abuse has awarded a University at Buffalo scientist a $2 million grant to conduct research that will provide some answers.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Cannabis Prevents the Negative Behavioral and Physiological Effects of a Traumatic Event and of Its Reminders

Administering synthetic marijuana (cannabinoids) soon after a traumatic event can prevent PTSD-like (post-traumatic stress disorder) symptoms in rats, caused by the trauma and by trauma reminders

View | Comment