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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Sep-2014 1:00 PM EDT

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Mice Study Shows Efficacy of New Gene Therapy Approach for Toxin Exposures

New research led by Charles Shoemaker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, shows that gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention and treatment of botulism exposure over current methods. The findings of the National Institutes of Health funded study appear in the August 29 issue of PLOS ONE.

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Assortativity Signatures of Transcription Factor Networks (TFNs) Contribute to Robustness

Dartmouth researchers explored the type and number of connections in transcription factor networks (TFNs) to evaluate the role assortativity plays on robustness in a study published in PLOS Computational Biology in August. The study found that the assortativity signature contributes to a network’s resilience against mutations.

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“K-to-M” Histone Mutations: How Repressing the Repressors May Drive Tissue-Specific Cancers

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A paper from a laboratory at the Stowers Institute of Medical Research reports the first animal model created to assess the molecular effects of two different histone H3.3 mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila. The study from a team led by Investigator Ali Shilatifard, Ph.D. published in the August 29, 2014 issue of Science, strongly suggests that these mutations actually could drive cancer and identifies interacting partners and pathways that could be targeted for the treatment of cancer.

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Scientists Map the ‘Editing Marks’ on Fly, Worm, Human Genomes

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In the August 28 issue of the journal Nature a multi-institution research network called modENCODE (the Model Organism ENCylopedia Of DNA Elements) published three major papers that map and compare the genomes and epigenomes of humans and two model organisms, the fly, D. melanogaster, and the worm, C. elegans, in unprecedented detail. The fly and worm could serve as model organisms for screening drugs and micronutrients that might alter the epigenome, which is implicated in many diseases.

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Scripps Research Institute Scientists Link Alcohol-Dependence Gene to Neurotransmitter

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. The new research shows the gene, Nf1, regulates gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), a neurotransmitter that lowers anxiety and increases relaxation feelings.

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Dartmouth Pioneers Statistical Approach for Calculating Environmental Influences in Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) Results

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Model allows researcher to remove false positive findings that plague modern research when many dozens of factors and their interactions are suggested to play a role in causing complex diseases.

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UNC Lineberger Researchers Develop New Approach to Identify “Drivers” of Cancer

UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have developed a new integrated approach to pinpoint the genetic “drivers” of cancer, uncovering eight genes that could be viable for targeted breast cancer therapy.

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Physician Experts Discuss Advances in Genetic Testing & Laboratory Medicine at CAP'14, Sept. 7-10, Chicago @Pathologists

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How Lizards Regenerate Their Tails: Researchers Discover Genetic ‘Recipe’

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By understanding the secret of how lizards regenerate their tails, researchers may be able to develop ways to stimulate the regeneration of limbs in humans. Now, a team of researchers from Arizona State University is one step closer to solving that mystery. The scientists have discovered the genetic “recipe” for lizard tail regeneration, which may come down to using genetic ingredients in just the right mixture and amounts.

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