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April Was 4th Warmest Month in Satellite Record

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Global Temperature Report: April 2016

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When It Comes to Spring Allergies, Oak Pollen More Potent Than Pine; Food Allergies of Low-Income Kids Are Poorly Managed; Flowers Not to Blame for Allergies, and More in the Allergies Channel

When It Comes to Spring Allergies, Oak Pollen More Potent Than Pine; Food Allergies of Low-Income Kids Are Poorly Managed; Flowers Not to Blame for Allergies, and More in the Allergies Channel

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Biologists Find the Arizona Black Rattlesnake on ‘Extinction Trajectory’

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A combination of drought and fire has put the Arizona black rattlesnake on an “extinction trajectory,” according to University of Arkansas researchers.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 4-May-2016 6:05 PM EDT

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Global Food Summit at UCI to Address Sustainable Solutions to Feeding the World

Global Food Summit: Sustainable Solutions is the second of a two-part Global Food Security conference held at University of California, Irvine. Internationally renowned food security leaders, practitioners and academics will address critical topics, ranging from global efforts to improve agriculture to the promise of technological advances. For full list of events, go to: http://blumcenter.uci.edu/gfs/

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Influence of Sea-Ice Loss on Arctic Warming Is Shaped by Temperatures in the Pacific Ocean

Influence of sea-ice loss on Arctic warming is shaped by varying temperatures in the Pacific Ocean, new study shows

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Maryland Climate and Health Report Identifies State's Vulnerabilities to Climate Change

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As world leaders convene in Washington, DC this week for the Climate Action 2016 summit, a new report by Maryland public health leaders, the Maryland Climate and Health Profile report, details the impacts of climate change on the health of Marylanders now and in the future.

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New Study Found Ocean Acidification May Be Impacting Coral Reefs in the Florida Keys

In a new study, University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science researchers found that the limestone that forms the foundation of coral reefs along the Florida Reef Tract is dissolving during the fall and winter months on many reefs in the Florida Keys. The research showed that the upper Florida Keys were the most impacted by the annual loss of reef.

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Climate-Exodus Expected in the Middle East and North Africa

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Part of the Middle East and North Africa may become uninhabitable due to climate change.

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U.S. Climate-Adaptation Plans Long on Ideas, Short on Details, Priorities

An analysis of more than 40 climate-adaptation plans from across the U.S. shows that local communities are good at developing strategies to combat the harmful effects of climate change but often fail to prioritize their goals or to provide implementation details.

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A Cleansing Rain Falls; A Soil-Filled Mist Arises

Scientists have found that rain triggers the release of a mist of particles from wet soils into the air, a finding with consequences for how scientists model our planet’s climate and future. The evidence comes in the form of tiny glassy spheres, less than one-hundredth the width of a human hair, discovered in the Great Plains.

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Tracking Climate Change? Use the Daily Highs

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Scientists using long-term surface temperature data to track climate change caused by greenhouse gases would be best served using only daily high temperature readings without the nighttime lows, according to new research.

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Widespread Loss of Ocean Oxygen to Become Noticeable in 2030s

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A drop in the amount of oxygen dissolved in the oceans due to climate change is already discernible in some parts of the world and should be evident across large parts of the ocean between 2030 and 2040, according to a new study.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 5-May-2016 5:00 PM EDT

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Building on Shells: UGA Interdisciplinary Study Starts Unraveling Mysteries of Calusa Kingdom

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Centuries before modern countries such as Dubai and China started building islands, native peoples in southwest Florida known as the Calusa were piling shells into massive heaps to construct their own water-bound towns.

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Ice Loss Accelerating in Greenland's Coastal Glaciers

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Surface meltwater draining through and underneath Greenland's tidewater glaciers is accelerating their loss of ice mass, according to a Dartmouth study that sheds light on the relationship between meltwater and subglacial discharge.

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Insect Outbreaks Reduce Wildfire Severity

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A surprising new study suggests that major insect outbreaks--contrary to current thinking and forest management guidelines--can reduce forest fire damage.

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New Tool Puts a Consistent Value on Experts' Uncertainty on Climate Change Models

Science can flourish when experts disagree, but in the governmental realm uncertainty can lead to inadequate policy and preparedness. When it comes to climate change, it can be OK for computational models to differ on what future sea levels will be. The same flexibility does not exist for determining the height of a seawall needed to protect people from devastating floods.

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Model Predicts How Forests Will Respond to Climate Change

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US Northeast's mixed forests unsustainable after 2050 while Cascade Mountains may require subtropical forest species.

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Rare Ice Data Collected by Early ‘Citizen Scientists’ Confirms Warming Since Industrial Revolution

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In 1442, 50 years before Columbus “sailed the ocean blue,” Shinto priests in Japan began keeping records of the annual freeze dates of a nearby lake. Along a Finnish river, starting in 1693, local merchants recorded the date the ice broke up each spring. These observations are among the oldest inland water ice records in human history, and now they are contributing to modern understanding of climate change.