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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Feb-2015 7:05 PM EST

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Least Known Chimpanzee Threatened by Climate Change

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Human beings are not the only great ape species likely to be severely impacted by climate change in the future. According to a new study by the Drexel University, Wildlife Conservation Society, and other groups, the Nigerian-Cameroon chimpanzee—the most endangered of all chimpanzee subspecies—may lose much of its habitat within the next five years and fully half of it in the next century.

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California’s Policies Can Significantly Cut Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through 2030

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A new model of the impact of California’s existing and proposed policies on its greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction goals suggests that the state is on track to meet 2020 goals, and could achieve greater emission reductions by 2030, but the state will need to do more to reach its 2050 climate goals.

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As Ebola Deaths Rise, Researcher Sees Parallels with Devastating Medieval Plague

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Nükhet Varlik, a Rutgers historian, has studied the Black Death – the medieval plague that may have wiped out more than half of the population in vast parts of the world – and found echoes from centuries past in issues such as the spread of deadly diseases including Ebola, human interactions with the environment, climate change and other dilemmas that affect human health today as much as they did in the Middle Ages. There is much we may be able to learn about modern times from what Professor Varlik has found.

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Two Lakes Beneath the Ice in Greenland, Gone Within Weeks

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Researchers discovered craters left behind when two sub-glacial lakes in Greenland drained away--an indication that the natural plumbing system beneath the ice sheet is overflowing with meltwater.

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Study: Melting Glaciers Have Big Carbon Impact

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As the earth warms, scientists have been focused on how glaciers melting will affect sea level rise. But, another lurking impact is the amount of carbon that will be released when glaciers melt. This is the first attempt to calculate how much carbon will be released.

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Humanity Has Exceeded 4 of 9 ‘Planetary Boundaries,’ According to Researchers

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An international team of researchers says climate change, the loss of biosphere integrity, land-system change, and altered biogeochemical cycles like phosphorus and nitrogen runoff have all passed beyond levels that put humanity in a “safe operating space.” Civilization has crossed four of nine so-called planetary boundaries as the result of human activity, according to a report published today in Science by the 18-member research team.

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Wheat Yield to Decline as Temperatures Increase

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GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- For every degree Celsius that the temperature increases, the world stands to lose 6 percent of its wheat crop, according to a new global study led by a University of Florida scientist. That’s one fourth of the annual global wheat trade, which reached 147 million tons in 2013.

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Nearly Half the Systems Crucial to Stability of Planet Compromised

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Almost half of the processes that are crucial to maintaining the stability of the planet have become dangerously compromised by human activity. That is the view of an international team of 18 researchers who provide new evidence of significant changes in four of the nine systems which regulate the resilience of the Earth.

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UF/IFAS Study: Wheat Yield to Decline as Temperatures Increase

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Production of wheat, one of the world's most important food crops, will decline as temperatures increase, a finding made possible by pooling computer models worldwide, in a study led by a UF/IFAS researcher.