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Medicine

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zika, Zika vaccine, Infectious Disease

Synthetic DNA-based Zika Vaccine Candidate Found to be Safe and Effective at Inducing Immune Response

A new generation DNA-based Zika vaccine is the first to demonstrate both safety and the ability to elicit an immune response against Zika in humans, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, conducted in partnership with The Wistar Institute, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, and GeneOne Life Science, Inc. In results published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, the phase 1 clinical trial showed for the first time that humans who received up to three doses of the vaccine candidate produced an immune response against Zika with minimal adverse effects, opening the door to further clinical trials for this important vaccine candidate.

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Global Health

Mount Sinai Heart Director Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, Provides Recommendations for Promoting Global Cardiovascular Health

Co-Chair of Consensus Committee Advising Trump Administration on Global Health Outlines How the United States Can Bolster Its Global Health Efforts

Medicine

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DACA, Health Policy, Mental Health, Public Health, Penn Medicine

Ending DACA Could Have Dire Public Health Consequences

The pending termination of DACA may reverse these mental health benefits for the 800,000 DACA beneficiaries, and trigger a public health crisis, according to an essay in the New England Journal of Medicine, co-authored by Atheendar. S. Venkataramani, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Medicine

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Medicine & Health, Asthma, Reseach, Healthcare, Science

Precision Therapy Proves Effective in Treatment-Resistant Subgroup of COPD Patients

Antibody treatment reduces rate of flare-ups in patients with a subgroup of treatment-resistant COPD.

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Osteoporosis, Fragility Fractures, bone formation , Bone Resorption, romosozumab

New Drug Shown to Lower Risk of Fracture in Women with Osteoporosis

A new drug that boosts bone formation has been shown to reduce the risk of fracture in women with osteoporosis when compared to one of the most commonly used osteoporosis medications, according to findings from UAB reported online in NEJM.

Medicine

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Cancer, Melanoma, High Risk, Immunotheapy, drug, nivolumab, Ipilimumab, Disease

Alternative Immunotherapy Drug More Effective than Current Standard of Care in Treating Advanced Melanoma after Surgical Removal of Disease

The immunotherapy drug nivolumab is safer and more effective than ipilimumab—the current standard of care—in treating patients with resected stage III and stage IV melanoma.

Medicine

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Chronic Bronchitis, COPD, Lung Disease, Mucins, Mucus, Phlegm, Diagnostic Tests

New Insights on Chronic Bronchitis: Diagnostic Test and Better Treatments on the horizon

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Mucin levels – the proteins that make mucus thick – is abnormally high in chronic bronchitis and mucin concentrations are associated with disease severity. This finding could become the first-ever objective marker of chronic bronchitis and lead to the creation of diagnostic and prognostic tools.

Medicine

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Cardiology, Drug Trial, Coronary Disease, vascular dis, Blood Thinners, Anticoagulant, Heart Attack, Stroke, Death, Cardiovascular Death, Drug Combination, gastroenterology bleeds, Limb Amputation, limb ischemia, Peripheral Arterial Disease, Cardiovascular Events, Combination Therapy

Researchers Find Combination Therapy Works Best for Heart Diseases

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A major international study has found that the combination of two drugs – rivaroxaban and aspirin -- is superior to aspirin alone in preventing further heart complications in people with vascular disease.

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Systolic Blood Pressure, Hypertension, High Blood Pressure, Sprint, Intensive blood pressure control

Two Studies Support Intensive Blood Pressure Control for Long-Term Health and Quality of Life

Two studies provide additional support for lowering systolic blood pressure to an intensive goal of 120 mmHg – far below the standard guidelines of 140 mmHg – to reduce the risk of heart disease in high-risk patients with hypertension. The new research shows that intensive blood pressure control is well-tolerated by patients and is cost-effective in terms of health-related quality of life and financial costs to the healthcare system, and appears online in NEJM on Aug. 24.

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IDeS, Kidney Transplant, Organ Transplant Rejection, Stanley C. Jordan , Human Leukocyte Antigens, HLA, Streptococcus pyogenes

Drug Therapy Using Enzyme from Lethal Bacteria Could Significantly Reduce Organ Rejection in Kidney Transplants

An experimental treatment derived from a potentially deadly microorganism may provide lifesaving help for kidney transplant patients, according to an international study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai. The study found that treating patients with the drug IdeS® before transplantation significantly reduced, and in most cases eliminated, donor-specific antibodies that can cause rejection or failure of the new organ.







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