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Article ID: 696378

Protein Data Bank at Rutgers Benefits Global Health, Science, Economy

Rutgers University-New Brunswick

When Jimmy Carter was diagnosed with end-stage metastatic melanoma in 2015, he began taking a drug developed in part using 3D molecular data. Insights like these into drug discovery and other fields of scientific research are possible using the 140,000-plus 3D molecular structures made freely available in the RCSB Protein Data Bank at Rutgers University–New Brunswick.

Released:
21-Jun-2018 12:00 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696253

A Bit of Quantum Logic—What Did the Atom Say to the Quantum Dot?

Department of Energy, Office of Science

Let’s talk! Scientists demonstrate coherent coupling between a quantum dot and a donor atom in silicon, vital for moving information inside quantum computers.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696407

Collaboration yields discovery of 12-sided silica cages

Cornell University

In a paper published in Nature, a team led by Uli Wiesner, the Spencer T. Olin Professor of Engineering in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University, reports discovery of 10-nanometer, individual, self-assembled dodecahedral structures – 12-sided silica cages that could have applications in mesoscale material assembly, as well as medical diagnosis and therapeutics.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696302

Not always bad — MXenes’ spontaneous oxidation harnessed to create 2-D nanocomposites

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have discovered a new way to harness the potential of a type of spontaneously oxidized MXene thin films, to create nanocomposites that could sense both light and the environment. Previously, such spontaneous oxidation was considered detrimental because it degrades the MXene structure. The research is published in the June 2018 issue of ACS Nano, one of Google Scholar’s top-rated, peer-reviewed scientific journals.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    19-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696185

Sodium- and Potassium-based Batteries Hold Promise for Cheap Energy Storage

Georgia Institute of Technology

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found new evidence suggesting that batteries based on sodium and potassium hold promise as a potential alternative to lithium-based batteries.

Released:
15-Jun-2018 1:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696250

Carbon Nanotube Optics Poised to Provide Pathway to Optical-Based Quantum Cryptography and Quantum Computing

Los Alamos National Laboratory

Researchers at Los Alamos and partners in France and Germany are exploring the enhanced potential of carbon nanotubes as single-photon emitters for quantum information processing. Their analysis of progress in the field is published in this week’s edition of the journal Nature Materials.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696237

Scientists Use Neutrons to Take a Deeper Look at Record Boost in Thermoelectric Efficiency

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Neutron facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory are aiding scientists in research to boost the power and efficiency of thermoelectric materials. These performance increases could enable more cost-effective and practical uses for thermoelectrics, with wider industry adoption, to improve fuel economy in vehicles, make power plants more efficient, and advance body heat–powered technologies for watches and smartphones.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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Article ID: 696224

The science behind pickled battery electrolytes

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne material scientists have discovered a reaction that helps explain the behavior of a key electrolyte additive used to boost battery performance.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696106

Scientists Create Continuously Emitting Microlasers With Nanoparticle-Coated Beads

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Researchers have found a way to convert nanoparticle-coated microscopic beads into lasers smaller than red blood cells. These microlasers, which convert infrared light into light at higher frequencies, are among the smallest continuously emitting lasers of their kind ever reported and can constantly and stably emit light for hours at a time, even when submerged in biological fluids such as blood serum.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 1:50 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696221

Making Tape Out of Trees

University of Delaware

A team of chemical engineers has developed a more sustainable way of making tape by using plants. The new process allows for the manufacturing of tape adhesive using a substance paper manufacturers throw away. Their invention performs just as well as at least two major brands.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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