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Stressed Out: Research Sheds New Light on Why Rechargeable Batteries Fail

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Scientists have discovered that lithium ions stress and strain on battery materials. These changes may help explain why most anodes made of layered materials eventually fail.

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Story Tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, October 2014

To arrange for an interview with a researcher, please contact the Communications staff member identified at the end of each tip. For more information on ORNL and its research and development activities, please refer to one of our media contacts. If you have a general media-related question or comment, you can send it to news@ornl.gov.

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Researcher Creating Shape-Shifting Material Geared For Correcting Facial Defects

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A newly developed material that molds itself to fill gaps in bone while promoting bone growth could more effectively treat defects in the facial region, says a Texas A&M University researcher who is creating the shape-shifting material.

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UA Researchers Develop Novel Method for Making Electrical Cellulose Fibers

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By using liquid salts during formation instead of harsh chemicals, fibers that conduct electricity can be strengthened, according to a patent issued to a team of researchers at The University of Alabama.

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Interface Surprises May Motivate Novel Oxide Electronic Devices

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Complex oxides have long tantalized the materials science community for their promise in next-generation energy and information technologies. Complex oxide crystals combine oxygen atoms with assorted metals to produce unusual and very desirable properties.

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"Bendy" LEDs

"Bendy" light-emitting diode (LED) displays and solar cells crafted with inorganic compound semiconductor micro-rods are moving one step closer to reality, thanks to graphene and the work of a team of researchers in Korea.

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Future Flexible Electronics Based on Carbon Nanotubes

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Researchers have demonstrated a new method to improve the reliability and performance of transistors and circuits based on carbon nanotubes (CNT), a semiconductor material that has long been considered by scientists as one of the most promising successors to silicon for smaller, faster and cheaper electronic devices. The result appears in a new paper published in the journal Applied Physics Letters.

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University of Utah Engineers Unlock Potential for Faster Computing

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University of Utah engineers discovered a way to create a special material – a metal layer on top of a silicon semiconductor – that could lead to cost-effective, superfast computers that perform lightning-fast calculations but don’t overheat. This new “topological insulator” behaves like an insulator on the inside but conducts electricity on the outside.

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Graphene Imperfections Key to Creating Hypersensitive 'Electronic Nose'

UIC researchers have discovered a way to create a highly sensitive chemical sensor based on the crystalline flaws in graphene sheets. The imperfections have unique electronic properties that the researchers were able to exploit to increase sensitivity to absorbed gas molecules by 300 times.

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UChicago-Argonne National Lab Team Improves Solar-Cell Efficiency

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New light has been shed on solar power generation using devices made with polymers, thanks to a collaboration between scientists in the University of Chicago’s chemistry department, the Institute for Molecular Engineering, and Argonne National Laboratory.

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