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Science

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alane, hydrogen & fuel cells, Ames Laboratory, Hydrogen Fuel, materials and manufacturing, materials analysis, Computational Chemistry

Ames Lab Discovers Way to Make Alane a Better Hydrogen Fuel Option for Vehicles

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Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory, in collaboration with several partners, have discovered a less-expensive, more energy-efficient way to produce alane – aluminum trihydride – a hydrogen source widely considered to be a technological dead-end for use in automotive vehicles.

Science

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physical sciences, Engineering, chemical sciences, Materials Science, Energy, Energy efficiency , hydrogen & fuel cells, energy usage, Catalysis & energy conversion, complex oxides, Defects in materials , Magnetism, Semiconductors, materials simulation & theory, Superconductivity, Surface & interface studies, Thin Films, Economic Impact, Site sustainabilit

Lab Breaks Ground on New Materials Design Laboratory to Spur Transformative Technologies

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The new Materials Design Laboratory at Argonne will be the final building to complete Argonne’s Energy Quad – a group of four adjoining buildings designed to maximize collaboration between energy and materials scientists at Argonne. A groundbreaking ceremony for the MDL was held on September 2.

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World's Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector, What to Expect From the Coming Quantum Era and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

Science

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Nanotechnology, Artificial Muscles, Carbon Nanotube, intelligent textiles, Material Science

UT Dallas Scientists Put a New Twist on Artificial Muscles

In recent years, researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas and colleagues at the University of Wollongong in Australia have put a high-tech twist on the ancient art of fiber spinning, using modern materials to create ultra-strong, powerful, shape-shifting yarns.

Science

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Superhydrophobic, Coating, Glass Display, Smartphones, samsung, Dirt repellent, Water Repellent, Antireflective, Nanomaterials, Materials Science

Samsung Licenses ORNL Transparent Superhydrophobic Glass Coatings for Electronic Devices

Samsung Electronics has exclusively licensed optically clear superhydrophobic film technology from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory to improve the performance of glass displays on smartphones, tablets and other electronic devices.

Science

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Light, molecular rotor, glow in dark, LED light, Chemistry & Materials, Viscosity, Cell imaging, UVM, Vermont, Luminescence, Fluorescence, chemical activity

Discovery: A New Form of Light

Scientist have discovered a new method to create fluorescent light that may have promising applications from LEDs to medical imaging.

Science

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Anthrax, Toxin, Structural Biology, Lethal Factor

How the Anthrax Toxin Forms a Deadly “Conveyer Belt”

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Researchers have built a three-dimensional map of the anthrax toxin that may explain how it efficiently transfers its lethal components into the cytoplasm of infected cells. The study, “Structure of anthrax lethal toxin prepore complex suggests a pathway for efficient cell entry,” which will be published online September 26 ahead of print in The Journal of General Physiology, suggests that the bacterial protein acts as a “conveyer belt” that allows toxic enzymes to continuously stream across cell membranes.

Science

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Spallation Neutron Source, Spallation, Neutron, Neutron Science, Neutron Scattering, Materials Science, Accelerator, Linear Accelerator, science history

ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source Marks Decade, Honors Pioneers Shull, Wollan

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The Spallation Neutron Source marks a decade as a leading neutron science facility today at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Electrons, Materials, Chemistry, Catalysis, Condensed Matter, energy science, Lasers, Materials Science, Ultrafast, X-ray science, X-ray Scattering and Detection, x-ray diffraction, LCLS , Linac Coherent Light Source, LCLS-II, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, photon science

SLAC’s X-Ray Laser Glimpses How Electrons Dance with Atomic Nuclei in Materials

The coupling between electrons and phonons determines how efficiently solar cells convert sunlight into electricity. It also plays key roles in superconductors that transfer electricity without losses, topological insulators that conduct electricity only on their surfaces, materials that drastically change their electrical resistance when exposed to a magnetic field, and more. At the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, scientists can study these coupled motions in unprecedented detail with the world’s most powerful X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). LCLS is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

Science

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Physical Science, Engineering, Materials Science, Center For Nanoscale Materials

Argonne Appoints New Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Global Security

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The U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory announced today the appointment of Jeffrey L. Binder to the position of Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Global Security (EGS).

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Argonne Ahead of the “Curve” in Magnetic Study

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In a new study by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory, scientists noticed that magnetic skyrmions – small electrically uncharged circular structures with a spiraling magnetic pattern – do get deflected by an applied current, much like a curveball gets deflected by airflow.

Science

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cool roof, automotive paints

We’re Not in Kansas Anymore: Fluorescent Ruby Red Roofs Stay as Cool as White

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Elementary school science teaches us that in the sun, dark colors get hot while white stays cool. Now new research from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has found an exception: scientists have determined that certain dark pigments can stay just as cool as white by using fluorescence, the re-emission of absorbed light.

Science

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Ferroelectrics, multiferroics, ferromagnetic materials

A Conscious Coupling of Magnetic and Electric Materials

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Scientists have successfully paired ferroelectric and ferrimagnetic materials so that their alignment can be controlled with a small electric field at near room temperatures, an achievement that could open doors to ultra low-power microprocessors, storage devices and next-generation electronics.

Science

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Engineering, Drexel College of Engineering, Materials Science & Engineering, deformational behaviors, Materials, Geology, Seismology, Materials Science, Dislocation, twinning, ripplocation

A Breakthrough in Our Understanding of How Things Deform

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Every material can bend and break. Through nearly a century’s worth of research, scientists have had a pretty good understanding of how and why. But, according to new findings from Drexel University materials science and engineering researchers, our understanding of how layered materials succumb to stresses and strains was lacking. The report suggests that, when compressed, layered materials — everything from sedimentary rocks, to beyond-whisker-thin graphite — will form a series of internal buckles, or ripples, as they deform.

Science

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Boise State University, Yanliang Zhang, Tony Varghese, Courtney Hollar, Joseph Richardson, Nicholas Kempf, Chao Han, Pansindu Gamarachchi, David Estrada, Rutvik J. Mehta, Thermoelectric

Boise State Research Explores Thermoelectric Screen Printing

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Flexible thermoelectric devices are especially attractive for waste heat recovery along contoured surfaces and for energy harvesting applications to power sensors, biomedical devices and wearable electronics – an area experiencing exponential growth. However, obtaining low-cost, flexible and efficient thermoelectric materials is extremely difficult due to many materials and manufacturing challenges.

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Nanoscale Tetrapods Could Provide Early Warning of a Material’s Failure

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Light-emitting, four-armed nanocrystals could someday form the basis of an early warning system in structural materials by revealing microscopic cracks that portend failure, thanks to recent research by scientists from Berkeley Lab.

Science

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Concrete, Chemical Agents, chemical attack, chemical spill, Decontamination, computer modeling and simulation, Cement

Cleaning Concrete Contaminated with Chemicals

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Craig Tenney, a chemical engineer at Sandia National Laboratories, is looking for better ways to clean contaminated concrete to reduce the impact of a U.S. transportation hub being contaminated with a chemical agent.

Science

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Materials Science, Nanoscience, Semiconductors, materials simulation & theory, Surface & interface studies, Thin Films

Diamond Proves Useful Material for Growing Graphene

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A team has developed a method to grow graphene that contains relatively few impurities, and costs less to make, in a shorter time and at lower temperatures compared to the processes widely used to make graphene today.

Science

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Neutron, Ultrasound, Materials, ferroelectric material, Department of Energy Office of Science, Department Of Energy, Department of Energy (DOE), Materials Science, Physics

Study Yields New Knowledge About Materials for Ultrasound and Other Applications

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Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and their research partners have used neutron scattering to discover the key to piezoelectric excellence in newer materials for ultrasound and other applications.

Science

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Earth core, Meteorites, Chondrites, neodymium, isotopic composition, Space

Researchers Find Earth Composed of Different Materials Than Meteorites

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Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory have found that, contrary to popular belief, the Earth is not comprised of the same material found in primitive meteorites (also known as chondrites).







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