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Making New Materials an Atomic Layer at a Time

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Researchers at Penn State’s Center for 2-Dimensional and Layered Materials and the University of Texas at Dallas have shown the ability to grow high quality, single-layer materials one on top of the other using chemical vapor deposition.

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Novel Technique Developed by NUS Scientists Opens Door to Better Solar Cells, Superconductors and Hard Drives

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A team of scientists, led by Assistant Professor Andrivo Rusydi from the Department of Physics at the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) Faculty of Science, has successfully developed a technique to study the interface between materials, shedding light on the new properties that arise when two materials are put together.

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Bio-Engineered Vaginas, How Do They Work? UPDATE: Watch Pre-Recorded Q&A

Newswise hosts the first live, interactive virtual event for major research finding for journalists. Newswise and Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center are collaborating to offer direct access to the investigator via Newswise Live, an interactive virtual event.

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Bio-Engineered Vaginas, How Do They Work? Researcher Takes Your Questions on Newswise Live Event

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At Long Last: A Concrete That’s Nearly Maintenance-Free

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Milwaukee engineers have created a cement composite that is durable, water-resistant and malleable with such a high level of “crack control” that the researchers estimate it has a service life of 120 years or more.

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Corralling Milk Microbes That Survive Pasteurization

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Corralling desperados with names like bacillus and paenibacillus will require ingenuity and an arsenal of weapons. These outlaws aren’t rustling cattle—they’re making milk sour and cheese soft and crumbly. For more than a century, milk has been heated to kill any bacteria or pathogens that can affect consumer health and shorten the shelf life of the product. However, microbes-- known as thermoduric--can survive pasteurization, according to South Dakota State University dairy science professor Sanjeev Anand. The Agricultural Experiment Station researcher has begun developing ways to combat heat-resistant microorganisms, a major challenge for the world’s dairy industry. His work is also supported by the Dairy Research Institute and the Midwest Dairy Food Research Center.

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Iowa State Materials Scientist Developing Materials, Electronics That Dissolve When Triggered

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An Iowa State research team is developing "transient materials" and "transient electronics" that can quickly and completely melt away when a trigger is activated. That could mean that one day you could send out a signal to destroy a lost credit card.

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Heat‐Conducting Polymer Cools Hot Electronic Devices at 200 Degrees C

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By harnessing an electropolymerization process to produce aligned arrays of polymer nanofibers, researchers have developed a thermal interface material able to conduct heat 20 times better than the original polymer. The material can operate at up to 200 degrees Celsius.

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Sheet Metal That Never Rattles

Researchers from Empa and ETH Zurich have succeeded in producing a prototype of a vibration-damping material that could change the world of mechanics forever. The material of the future is not only able to damp vibrations completely; it can also specifically conduct certain frequencies further.

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Scientists Track 3D Nanoscale Changes in Rechargeable Battery Material During Operation

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Scientists at the Brookhaven National Laboratory have made the first 3D observations of how the structure of a lithium-ion battery anode evolves at the nanoscale in a real battery cell as it discharges and recharges. The details of this research could point to new ways to engineer battery materials to increase the capacity and lifetime of rechargeable batteries.

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