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Science

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Biochemistry, Physics, Material Science, Energy fuels (non petroleum)

Green Light: USU Biochemists Describe Light-Driven Conversion of Greenhouse Gas to Fuel

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By way of a light-driven bacterium, Utah State University biochemists are a step closer to cleanly converting harmful carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion into usable fuels. Using the phototropic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris as a biocatalyst, the scientists generated methane from carbon dioxide in one enzymatic step.

Science

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3D granular materials, Force, fracking, Underground explosives, Geologic materials, sand, Soils

Feeling the Force Between Sand Grains

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LLNL researchers measure how forces move through 3D granular materials, such as sand and soil, which has applications in fracking and in identifying underground explosives.

Science

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Materials Science, Transportation, Center for Transportation Research, Vehicles, Biofuels, Diesel, Heavy-duty vehicles, Hybrid & electric vehicles, vehicle testing, Modeling, simulation, & visualization, Supercomputing, high-performance computing , Technology Development & Commercialization

Energy Department Awards Five New Argonne-Business Collaborations

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The U.S. Department of Energy announced last week that 43 small businesses will participate in the second round of the Small Business Vouchers (SBV) pilot.

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Funneling Fundamental Particles, Neutrino Experiments, Physicists Discover 'Apparent Departure From the Laws of Thermodynamics', and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

Science

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4d printing, 3D printing, additive manufacturing, smart materials , LLNL

‘4D Printing’ a New Dimension for Additive Manufacturing

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Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers have demonstrated the 3D printing of shape-shifting structures that can fold or unfold to reshape themselves when exposed to heat or electricity, an approach also known as “4D printing." The micro-architected structures, including boxes, conductive devices, and a stent, were fabricated from a conductive, environmentally responsive ‘smart’ ink developed at the Lab.

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Medicine/Health

Battery You Can Swallow Could Enable Future Ingestible Medical Devices

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Non-toxic, edible batteries could one day power ingestible devices for diagnosing and treating disease. One team reports new progress toward that goal with their batteries made with melanin pigments, naturally found in the skin, hair and eyes.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Energy/Fuel (non-petroleum), Materials (Superconductors/Semiconductors), Nanotechnology/Micromachines), Technology/Engineering/Computer Science

Stretchy Supercapacitors Power Wearable Electronics

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A future of soft robots that wash your dishes or smart T-shirts that power your cell phone may depend on the development of stretchy power sources. But traditional batteries are thick and rigid — not ideal properties for materials that would be used in tiny malleable devices. In a step toward wearable electronics, a team of researchers has produced a stretchy micro-supercapacitor using ribbons of graphene.

Science

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Optoelectroincs, Optoelectronic, optoelectric, 2D materials, 2D layered materials, 2d electronics, Material Science, material sciences

New Theory Could Lead to New Generation of Energy Friendly Optoelectronics

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Researchers at Queen’s University Belfast and ETH Zurich, Switzerland, have created a new theoretical framework which could help physicists and device engineers design better optoelectronics, leading to less heat generation and power consumption in electronic devices which source, detect, and control light.

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials; Polymer Chemistry)

Reducing Tire Waste by Using Completely Degradable, Synthetic Rubber

Scrap tires have been on environmentalists’ blacklist for decades. They pile up in landfills, have fed enormous toxic fires, harbor pests and get burned for fuel. Scientists trying to rid us of this scourge have developed a new way to make synthetic rubber. And once this material is discarded, it can be easily degraded back to its chemical building blocks and reused in new tires and other products.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Medicine/Health (Critical Care/Emergency Medicine; Sports Medicine [Trauma/Injury])

Nanoparticles That Speed Blood Clotting May Someday Save Lives

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Whether severe trauma occurs on the battlefield or the highway, saving lives often comes down to stopping the bleeding as quickly as possible. Many methods for controlling external bleeding exist, but at this point, only surgery can halt blood loss inside the body from injury to internal organs. Now, researchers have developed nanoparticles that congregate wherever injury occurs in the body to help it form blood clots, and they’ve validated these particles in test tubes and in vivo.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials, Materials, Energy/Fuel

Fungi Recycle Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries

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Although rechargeable batteries in smartphones, cars and tablets can be charged again and again, they don’t last forever. Old batteries often wind up in landfills or incinerators, potentially harming the environment. And valuable materials remain locked inside. Now, a team of researchers is turning to naturally occurring fungi to drive an environmentally friendly recycling process to extract cobalt and lithium from tons of waste batteries.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials, Optics), Biology

Squid, Jellyfish and Wrinkled Skin Inspire Materials for Anti-Glare Screens and Encryption

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What do squid and jellyfish skin have in common with human skin? All three have inspired a team of chemists to create materials that change color or texture in response to variations in their surroundings. These materials could be used for encrypting secret messages, creating anti-glare surfaces, or detecting moisture or damage, they say.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Pharmaceutical Sciences), Medicine/Health (Public Health)

Paper-Based Device Spots Falsified or Degraded Medications (Video)

The developing world is awash in substandard, degraded or falsified medications, which can either directly harm users or deprive them of needed treatment. And with internet sales of medications on the rise, people everywhere are increasingly at risk. So, a team of researchers has developed a simple, inexpensive paper-based device to screen suspicious medications.

Science

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Chemistry, Physics, Material Science

UCLA Physicists Discover 'Apparent Departure From the Laws of Thermodynamics'

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According to the basic laws of thermodynamics, if you leave a warm apple pie in a winter window eventually the pie would cool down to the same temperature as the surrounding air.

Science

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plasma processing, oxygen plasma, plasma activation, plasma etching, South Dakota State University, supercapacitors, Biochar, North Central Regional Sun Grant Center

Reducing cost of producing supercapacitors

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Using inexpensive biochar to coat electrodes and a new method to create the porous surface needed to capture electricity may reduce the cost of supercapacitors. Activating the biochar using plasma processing takes only five minutes with no external heating or chemicals needed.

Science

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Basic Energy Sciences, Material Science, material sciences, Materials Science, Materials Science & Engineering, materials science engineering, materials sciences, Lithium-ion batteries , lithium-ion battery, Batteries, Battery, solid electrolyte interphase, Imaging, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Joint Center for Energy Storage Research, interfac

Determining Real Molecules in Operating Batteries

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For the first time, scientists revealed the structural and chemical evolution of molecules at an electrode surface in an operating battery.

Science

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Basic Energy Sciences, Material Science, Materials Science, materials sciences, Materials Science & Engineering, Energy Frontier Research Centers, Energy Frontier Research Center, Advanced Light Source, SSRL, ALS, Magnesium, Batteries, Materials, Advanced Materials, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, University Of Illinois At Chicago, University

“High-Occupancy” Vehicle (HOV) Battery

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Future batteries made of negatively charged electrodes that take advantage of magnesium intercalation could have twice or more the energy density of today’s commercial lithium-ion batteries.

Science

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Astrophyics, Atomic Physics, Atomic and Molecular Physics, chemistry physics, Material Science

How We Escaped From the Big Bang

Associate Professor Dr Joan Vaccaro, of Griffith's Centre for Quantum Dynamics, has solved an anomaly of conventional physics and shown that a mysterious effect called 'T violation' could be the origin of time evolution and conservation laws.

Science

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Superconductivity, High-temperature superconductivity, High-temperature Superconductors, Cuprates, electron pairs, Superfluidity, copper oxide superconductors

Scientists Uncover the Origin of High-Temperature Superconductivity in Copper-Oxide Compound

Brookhaven physicist Ivan Bozovic and his team have an explanation for why certain materials can conduct electricity without resistance at temperatures well above those required by conventional superconductors.

Science

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Forestry, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, technology and engineering, Computer Science

Study Shows Wood Windows Are Cooler Than Glass

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Engineers at the A. James Clark School of Engineering at the University of Maryland (UMD) demonstrate in a new study that windows made of transparent wood could provide more even and consistent natural lighting and better energy efficiency than glass.







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