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Top UAB Doc Pledges Proceeds From Second Novel to Diabetes Research

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In “Command & Control,” the second novel by Stephen Russell, fictional retired orthopedic surgeon Mackie McKay finds himself in the middle of an infectious disease outbreak — with Ebola as a backdrop

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Doubling Saturated Fat in the Diet Does Not Increase Saturated Fat in Blood

Doubling saturated fat in the diet does not drive up total levels of saturated fat in the blood, according to a controlled diet study. Increasing levels of carbohydrates in the study diet promoted a steady increase in the blood of a fatty acid linked to higher risk for diabetes and heart disease.

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Holiday Overeating Can Be Big Problem for People with Type 2 Diabetes

Overindulging at a holiday party or two this season isn’t going make a big difference in someone’s health. But it could be a much different story for people with type 2 diabetes.

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Scientists Raise Alarm that Shortage of Human Islet Cells Will Slow Diabetes Research

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Rohit Kulkarni, M.D., Ph.D., Senior Investigator in the Section on Islet Cell and Regenerative Biology at Joslin Diabetes Center and Associate Professor at Harvard Medical School, coauthored a paper that was published today in Diabetes, which voiced concerns about the increasing difficulty of access to high quality islet cells for diabetes research.

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Exercise Regimens Offer Little Benefit for One in Five People with Type 2 Diabetes

As many as one in five people with Type 2 diabetes do not see any improvement in blood sugar management when they engage in a supervised exercise regimen, according to a new scientific review published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Penn Researchers Unwind the Mysteries of the Cellular Clock

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Underlying circadian rhythms is a clock built of transcription factors that control the oscillation of genes, serving as the wheels and springs of the clock. But, how does a single clock keep time in multiple phases at once? A genome-wide survey found that circadian genes and regulatory elements called enhancers oscillate daily in phase with nearby genes – both the enhancer and gene activity peak at the same time each day.

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Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Supports National Diabetes Education Program's Guiding Principles for Diabetes Care

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics supports a new set of 10 clinically useful principles highlighting areas of agreement in diabetes management and prevention that will help health care teams improve treatment for people with diabetes.

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Rates of Diabetic Kidney Disease May Be Underestimated

Rates of diabetic kidney disease could be higher than currently assumed according to a new study presented at ASN Kidney Week 2014 in Philadelphia. In an autopsy study of 150 individuals with type both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, researchers found 49.3% of individuals had diabetic nephropathy

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Blood Vessel Receptor That Responds to Light May Be New Target for Vascular Disease Treatments

A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine has discovered a receptor on blood vessels that causes the vessel to relax in response to light, making it potentially useful in treating vascular diseases. In addition, researchers discovered a previously unknown mechanism by which blood vessel function is regulated through light wavelength.

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New Study Finds Routine Imaging Screening of Diabetic Patients for Heart Disease Is Not Effective

Routine heart imaging screenings for people with diabetes at high risk to experience a cardiac event, but who have no symptoms of heart disease, does not help them avoid heart attacks, hospitalization for unstable angina or cardiac death, according to a major new study.

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