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Frankfurter Fraud: Finding Out What's in Your Hot Dog

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Hot dogs are the perfect summer fare. But knowing for sure what you're getting inside a bun can be difficult. Now scientists have devised a method that could help prevent frankfurter fraud, which is especially important for those who can't eat certain types of meats. They report their approach in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

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Preparing for (Another) Biological Attack

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In the weeks following the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks, five people died from exposure to anthrax-laced letters, and several more were infected. Fifteen years on, the U.S. has spent billions of dollars to fortify the nation’s biodefenses against future attacks, but is it enough? The cover story of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, examines whether the U.S. is really ready for another Amerithrax

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Snake Venom Composition Could Be Related to Hormones and Diet

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Many people are afraid of snakes, but scientists are now revealing insights about their venoms that could give even ophidiophobes an appreciation for the animals. One team has found that the proteins from the venom gland can vary depending on age and gender. These findings, reported in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research, suggest that hormonal and dietary influences are at play.

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Toward 'Greener,' Inexpensive Solar Cells

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Solar panels are proliferating across the globe to help reduce the world's dependency on fossil fuels. But conventional panels are not without environmental costs, too. Now scientists are reporting in the Journal of the American Chemical Society a new advance toward more practical, "greener" solar cells made with inexpensive halide perovskite materials. They have developed low-bandgap perovskite solar cells with a reduced lead content and a power conversion efficiency of 15 percent.

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alane, hydrogen & fuel cells, Ames Laboratory, Hydrogen Fuel, materials and manufacturing, materials analysis, Computational Chemistry

Ames Lab Discovers Way to Make Alane a Better Hydrogen Fuel Option for Vehicles

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Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory, in collaboration with several partners, have discovered a less-expensive, more energy-efficient way to produce alane – aluminum trihydride – a hydrogen source widely considered to be a technological dead-end for use in automotive vehicles.

Medicine

Science

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The Low Down on Sweet N Low, Apple and Lettuce Can Remedy Garlic Breath, Using X-Rays to Figure Out Fats, and More in the Food Science News Source

Click here to go to the Food Science News Source

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World's Most Sensitive Dark Matter Detector, What to Expect From the Coming Quantum Era and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

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Mitochondria, Proteins, Yeast, Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, Chemistry, Metabolism, Biochemistry

Yeast Knockouts Peel Back Secrets of Cell Protein Function

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To fill in the blanks on mitochondria, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison deleted 174 genes, one by one, in yeast. They then subjected the yeast to high-intensity mass spectrometry to measure unprecedented detail on thousands of metabolic products, including proteins, intermediate chemicals called metabolites, and lipids.

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Light, molecular rotor, glow in dark, LED light, Chemistry & Materials, Viscosity, Cell imaging, UVM, Vermont, Luminescence, Fluorescence, chemical activity

Discovery: A New Form of Light

Scientist have discovered a new method to create fluorescent light that may have promising applications from LEDs to medical imaging.

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Anthrax, Toxin, Structural Biology, Lethal Factor

How the Anthrax Toxin Forms a Deadly “Conveyer Belt”

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Researchers have built a three-dimensional map of the anthrax toxin that may explain how it efficiently transfers its lethal components into the cytoplasm of infected cells. The study, “Structure of anthrax lethal toxin prepore complex suggests a pathway for efficient cell entry,” which will be published online September 26 ahead of print in The Journal of General Physiology, suggests that the bacterial protein acts as a “conveyer belt” that allows toxic enzymes to continuously stream across cell membranes.

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Award, Chemistry, Reaxys, PhD, Early-career Researchers

Elsevier Announces Winners of the 2016 Reaxys PhD Prize

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Elsevier, a world-leading provider of scientific, technical and medical information products and services, announced the three winners of the 2016 Reaxys PhD Prize at its annual Symposium held in conjunction with the New Scientist Live festival in London.

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, lightsource, Fossil, bird feathers, bird, Science, Biological Science, Chemistry, Catalysis, X-ray imaging

In Bird Feathers, Scientists Find Hints About Color of Extinct Animals

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In order to discover the true colors of ancient animals, scientists are using X-rays to closely examine the chemical details of modern bird feathers. The researchers were able to map elements that make up pigments responsible for red and black colors in feathers. They hope to use this information to find traces of the same pigments in fossil specimens of extinct animals, such as dinosaurs. This latest discovery means that scientists may be able to go beyond monochrome in their depictions of fossilized creatures, and make steps towards portraying their colors more accurately.

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Solar energy , Alternative Energy, Chemistry, Batteries, Solar Power

A Marriage Made in Sunlight: Invention Merges Solar with Liquid Battery

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As solar cells produce a greater proportion of total electric power, a fundamental limitation remains: the dark of night when solar cells go to sleep. Lithium-ion batteries are too expensive a solution to use on something as massive as the electric grid. Song Jin, a professor of chemistry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, has a better idea: integrating the solar cell with a large-capacity battery.

Medicine

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ALS, Motor Neurons, Biochemistry & Biophysics, Lou Gehrig's Disease

New ALS Discovery: Scientists Reverse Protein Clumping Involved in Neurodegenerative Conditions

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine announced the first evidence that stabilizing a protein called SOD1 can help reverse protein clumping in the types of neurons affected by the fatal neurodegenerative condition Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Electrons, Materials, Chemistry, Catalysis, Condensed Matter, energy science, Lasers, Materials Science, Ultrafast, X-ray science, X-ray Scattering and Detection, x-ray diffraction, LCLS , Linac Coherent Light Source, LCLS-II, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, photon science

SLAC’s X-Ray Laser Glimpses How Electrons Dance with Atomic Nuclei in Materials

The coupling between electrons and phonons determines how efficiently solar cells convert sunlight into electricity. It also plays key roles in superconductors that transfer electricity without losses, topological insulators that conduct electricity only on their surfaces, materials that drastically change their electrical resistance when exposed to a magnetic field, and more. At the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, scientists can study these coupled motions in unprecedented detail with the world’s most powerful X-ray laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). LCLS is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

Medicine

Science

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Virginia Tech, ACS Chemical Biology, Fungus, Aspergillus Fumigatus, Drug Discovery, Virginia Tech Center for Drug Discovery

Researchers Find Fungus-Fighting Compound in Drug Discovery Center Library

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Researchers with the Virginia Tech Center for Drug Discovery have identified a compound that blocks the growth of a fungus that causes deadly lung infections and allergic reactions in people with compromised immune systems.

Science

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eLife, Fralin Life Science Institute, Virginia Tech, Mosquito, zika, Dengue Fever, Malaria, Vector Borne Diseases, genetic, Gene

Virginia Tech Researcher Finds Gene That Reduces Female Mosquitoes

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Zhijian “Jake” Tu and colleagues found that placing a particular Y chromosome gene on the autosomes of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes — a species responsible for transmitting malaria — killed off 100 percent of all female embryos that inherited this gene.

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MacArthur Fellowship, Macarthur Foundation, Award, genius grant, Chemistry, Organic Chemistry

Scripps Research Institute Chemist Jin-Quan Yu Wins MacArthur Fellowship

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Chemist Jin-Quan Yu of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) has won a 2016 MacArthur Fellowship, sometimes called a “genius grant.”

Science

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Neuroscience, Biochemistry, monobodies, pharmaceutical development, Molecular Biophysics, Neurodevelopment

Researchers Describe Key Protein Structure and a Drug Prototype That Could Assist Therapeutic Development

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Researchers from the University of Chicago have described the three-dimensional, atomic structure of an important cell receptor molecule linked to the development of several diseases.

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Precision Medicine, Thyroid, nobel prize in Chemistry

Nobel Laureate Thomas R. Cech, Ph.D. To Deliver Plenary Lecture at American Thyroid Association Annual Meeting

Thomas R. Cech, Ph.D., a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry and Distinguished Professor at the University of Colorado, Boulder, will present a Plenary Lecture entitled "Precision Medicine - From Iodine-131 to CRISPR Genome Editing" at the 86th Annual Meeting of the American Thyroid Association (ATA), on September 23rd, in Denver, CO.







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