Press "esc" to clear
Go to Advanced Search

Showing results

110 of 2467

Article ID: 696407

Collaboration yields discovery of 12-sided silica cages

Cornell University

In a paper published in Nature, a team led by Uli Wiesner, the Spencer T. Olin Professor of Engineering in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University, reports discovery of 10-nanometer, individual, self-assembled dodecahedral structures – 12-sided silica cages that could have applications in mesoscale material assembly, as well as medical diagnosis and therapeutics.

Released:
20-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Embargo will expire:
21-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
20-Jun-2018 1:45 PM EDT

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 21-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696399

Chameleon-Inspired Nanolaser Changes Colors

Northwestern University

• Chameleons change color by controlling the spacing among nanocrystals on their skin • Northwestern’s nanolaser changes color similarly — by controlling the spacing among metal nanoparticles • By stretching and releasing an elastic substrate, the nanoparticles move further apart or closer together to control color

Released:
20-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
SpontaneouslypartiallyoxidizedMXene.jpg

Article ID: 696302

Not always bad — MXenes’ spontaneous oxidation harnessed to create 2-D nanocomposites

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Researchers at Missouri University of Science and Technology have discovered a new way to harness the potential of a type of spontaneously oxidized MXene thin films, to create nanocomposites that could sense both light and the environment. Previously, such spontaneous oxidation was considered detrimental because it degrades the MXene structure. The research is published in the June 2018 issue of ACS Nano, one of Google Scholar’s top-rated, peer-reviewed scientific journals.

Released:
19-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 696239

Rewiring Plant Defence Genes to Reduce Crop Waste

University of Warwick

Plants can be genetically rewired to resist the devastating effects of disease – significantly reducing crop waste worldwide – according to new research into synthetic biology by the University of Warwick.Led by Professor Declan Bates from the Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre (WISB) and Professor Katherine Denby from the University of York, who is also an Associate member of WISB, researchers have developed a genetic control system that would enable plants to strengthen their defence response against deadly pathogens – so they could remain healthy and productive.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
miniecosystem1.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jun-2018 12:00 PM EDT

Article ID: 696193

Scripps Research Chemists Design 'Miniecosystems' to Test Drug Function

Scripps Research Institute

Scripps Research scientists have solved a major problem in chemistry and drug development by using droplet-sized ‘miniecosystems’ to quickly see if a molecule can function as a potential therapeutic.

Released:
15-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
DanielAbraham900X600.jpg

Article ID: 696224

The science behind pickled battery electrolytes

Argonne National Laboratory

Argonne material scientists have discovered a reaction that helps explain the behavior of a key electrolyte additive used to boost battery performance.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 11:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
Yu_Nature_diagram.jpg
  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696203

Chemists Achieve Major Milestone of Synthesis: Remote Chiral Induction

Scripps Research Institute

"This new method should allow us to explore a large ‘chemical space’ that had been essentially off-limits."

Released:
15-Jun-2018 5:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment
artwork_s_layer_final.jpg

Article ID: 696209

SLAC, Stanford Scientists Discover How a Hardy Microbe’s Crystalline Shell Helps it Reel in Food

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

SLAC and Stanford scientists have discovered how some archaea thrive where other organisms would starve: Their crystalline shells not only protect them from the environment, but they also draw in nutrients through nanosized pores. Those nutrients concentrate in the space between the shell and the microbial cell, so what looks like a famine turns into a feast.

Released:
18-Jun-2018 12:05 AM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Article ID: 696206

Penn Medicine Biochemist Receives Major Award for Research on Epigenetic Protein Modifications via Mass Spectrometry

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

Benjamin A.Garcia, PhD, an expert in quantitative proteomics has been awarded the Biemann Medal by the American Society for Mass Spectrometry (ASMS). The early-career award recognizes significant achievement in basic or applied mass spectrometry. Garcia’s lab has develop

Released:
16-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
EXPERT AVAILABLE
Open in New Tab
Add to Favorites
Comment

Showing results

110 of 2467





Chat now!