Feature Channels

Chemistry

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Nanosafety Research: The Quest for the Gold Standard

Empa toxicologist Harald Krug has lambasted his colleagues in the journal Angewandte Chemie. He evaluated several thousand studies on the risks associated with nanoparticles and discovered no end of shortcomings: poorly prepared experiments and results that don’t carry any clout. Instead of merely leveling criticism, however, Empa is also developing new standards for such experiments within an international Network.

View | Comment

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Microrockets Fueled by Water Neutralize Chemical and Biological Warfare Agents

image625415.jpg

With fears growing over chemical and biological weapons falling into the wrong hands, scientists are developing microrockets to fight back against these dangerous agents, should the need arise. In the journal ACS Nano, they describe new spherical micromotors that rapidly neutralize chemical and biological agents and use water as fuel.

View

Science

Channels:

Why Plants Don't Get Sunburn

Plants rely on sunlight to make their food, but they also need protection from its harmful rays, just like humans do. Recently, scientists discovered a group of molecules in plants that shields them from sun damage. Now, in an article in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, one team reports on the mechanics of how these natural plant sunscreens work.

View

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

New Compounds Reduce Debilitating Inflammation

Six Case Western Reserve scientists are part of an international team that has discovered two compounds that show promise in decreasing inflammation in diseases such as ulcerative colitis and arthritis. The compounds appear to curtail inflammation-triggering signals from RIPK2. These findings appear in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

New Microscope Collects Dynamic Images of the Molecules That Animate Life

A new imaging platform developed by Eric Betzig and colleagues at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Janelia Research Campus offers another leap forward for light microscopy. The new technology collects high-resolution images rapidly and minimizes damage to cells, meaning it can image the three-dimensional activity of molecules, cells, and embryos in fine detail over longer periods than was previously possible. Betzig was one of three scientists who shared the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry earlier this month.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

Scripps Research Institute Chemists Achieve New Technique with Profound Implications for Drug Development

yu_jin-quan.jpg

A team from The Scripps Research Institute has established a new C-H activation technique that opens the door to creating a broader range of pure molecules of one-handedness or “chirality” by eliminating previous starting-material limitations.

View | Comment

Science

Channels:

Keywords:

New TSRI Studies Bring Scientists Closer to Combating Dangerous Unstable Proteins

wiseman_r_luke.jpg

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a way to decrease deadly protein deposits in the heart, kidney and other organs associated with a group of human diseases called the systemic amyloid diseases.

View | Comment

Medicine

Channels:

Keywords:

Cornell Chemists Show ALS Is a Protein Aggregation Disease

Using a technique that illuminates subtle changes in individual proteins, chemistry researchers at Cornell University have uncovered new insight into the underlying causes of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).

View

Science

Channels:

Turning Waste From Whisky-Making Into Fuel — Close to Commercial Reality?

A start-up company in Scotland is working to capitalize on the tons of waste produced by one of the country's most valued industries and turn the dregs of whisky-making into fuel. Celtic Renewables, formed in 2011, has refined its process based on a century-old fermentation technique and is now taking the next step toward a commercial plant, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.

View

Science

Channels:

Olive Oil More Stable and Healthful Than Seed Oils for Frying Food

625045.image.jpg

Frying is one of the world's most popular ways to prepare food — think fried chicken and french fries. Even candy bars and whole turkeys have joined the list. But before dunking your favorite food in a vat of just any old oil, consider using olive. Scientists report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that olive oil withstands the heat of the fryer or pan better than several seed oils to yield more healthful food.

View