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Scientists Find Protein-Building Enzymes Have Undergone Metamorphosis and Evolved Diverse New Functions

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Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute and Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and their collaborators have found that ancient enzymes, known for their fundamental role in translating genetic information into proteins, evolved myriad other functions in humans.

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Research Finds Bedbugs Can Be Killed with Lower Dosage of Chemical

University entomologist finds insecticide company can use smaller amount of chemical to treat bedbug infestations, which have been increasing in the United States.

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A Natural Way to Monitor, and Possibly Control Populations of, Stink Bugs


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Anyone who has squashed a stink bug knows why they got their name. Although just a nuisance to homeowners, the insects feed on and damage fruits and vegetables, causing significant economic losses for farmers. Now scientists report in ACS’ Journal of Natural Products that they’ve discovered certain stink bug pheromone components and made them artificially in the lab for the first time, and these substances can be used to monitor and manage their populations.

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Potent Spider Toxin 'Electrocutes' German, Not American, Cockroaches

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Using spider toxins to study the proteins that let nerve cells send out electrical signals, Johns Hopkins researchers say they have stumbled upon a biological tactic that may offer a new way to protect crops from insect plagues in a safe and environmentally responsible way.

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New Compound Treats Both Blindness and Diabetes in Animal Studies

In a new study led by UC San Francisco (UCSF) scientists, a chemical compound designed to precisely target part of a crucial cellular quality-control network provided significant protection, in rats and mice, against degenerative forms of blindness and diabetes.

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American Chemical Society Meeting Features Hands-On Family Event, Energy Symposia

A special hands-on outreach program for children and their families exploring everyday chemistry and two symposia on energy (one on hydraulic fracturing and one on solar fuels) are among the presidential events at the American Chemical Society’s (ACS’) 248th National Meeting & Exposition next month. The gathering of the world’s largest scientific society will be held in San Francisco August 10-14.

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Study Yields First Snapshots of Water Splitting in Photosynthesis

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An international team, led by Arizona State University scientists, has published today in Nature a groundbreaking study that shows the first snapshots of photosynthesis in action as it splits water into protons, electrons and oxygen, the process that maintains Earth’s oxygen atmosphere.

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Bacteria Hijack Plentiful Iron Supply Source to Flourish

In an era of increasing concern antibiotic-resistant illness, Case Western Reserve researchers have identified a new pathway to disabling disease: blocking bacteria’s access to iron. The scientists showed how bacterial siderophore captures iron from two supply sources to fan bacterial growth and how the body launches a chemical counterassault.

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Highlights for 2014 National Meeting of World’s Largest Scientific Society

Journalists registering for the American Chemical Society’s (ACS’) 248th National Meeting & Exposition this summer will have an abundance of material to mine for their news stories. Nearly 12,000 presentations are planned on a broad range of topics from health to the environment. The meeting, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year, will be held August 10-14 in San Francisco.

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Cellular Gates for Sodium and Calcium Controlled by Common Element of Ancient Origin

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Researchers have spotted a strong family trait in two distant relatives: The channels that permit entry of sodium and calcium ions into cells share similar means for regulating ion intake. The new evidence is likely to aid development of drugs for channel-linked diseases ranging from epilepsy to heart ailments to muscle weakness.

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