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New Study Reveals Relationships Between Chemicals Found on Comets

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A new study has revealed similarities and relationships between certain types of chemicals found on 30 different comets, which vary widely in their overall composition compared to one another. The research is part of ongoing investigations into these primordial bodies, which contain material largely unchanged from the birth of the solar system some 4.6 billion years ago.

Science

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Water, Chemistry, Spectroscopy, Electricity, Conductivity, hydrogen, Proton

For the First Time, Scientists Catch Water Molecules Passing the Proton Baton

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Water conducts electricity, but the process by which this familiar fluid passes along positive charges has puzzled scientists for decades. But in a paper published in the Dec. 2 in issue of the journal Science, an international team of researchers has finally caught water in the act — showing how water molecules pass along excess charges and, in the process, conduct electricity.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Science, Chemistry, Catalysis, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

Q&A: Simon Bare Catalyzes New Chemistry Effort at SLAC

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Simon Bare, who joined the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in April, spent 30 years as an industrial chemist investigating how catalysts work. Now, as co-director of the Chemistry and Catalysis Division at the lab’s Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), his goal is to build on research strengths at SLAC and Stanford University to create a West Coast center for catalyst research and define new research directions.

Science

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Element, Superheavy element, Tennessee, Tennessine, element 117, New element, Chemistry, Physics, Element name, Periodic Table, Radioisotope, Radiochemistry

'Tennessine' Acknowledges State Institutions' Roles in Element's Discovery

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The recently discovered element 117 has been officially named "tennessine" in recognition of Tennessee’s contributions to its discovery, including the efforts of the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its Tennessee collaborators at Vanderbilt University and the University of Tennessee.

Medicine

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How to Ensure the Safety of Cosmetics

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In recent years, environmental groups have been calling out cosmetic preservatives as suspected endocrine disruptors, cancer-causing agents and skin irritants. The campaigns have resulted in new restrictions on certain preservatives. But, as reported in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, the shrinking list of approved preservatives is having unintended consequences.

Medicine

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Urine Test for Fatigue Could Help Prevent Accidents

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Doctors, pilots, air traffic controllers and bus drivers have at least one thing in common — if they're exhausted at work, they could be putting lives at risk. But the development of a new urine test, reported in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, could help monitor just how weary they are. The results could potentially reduce fatigue-related mistakes by allowing workers to recognize when they should take a break.

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Biomass Heating Could Get a 'Green' Boost with the Help of Fungi

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In colder weather, people have long been warming up around campfires and woodstoves. Lately, this idea of burning wood or other biomass for heat has surged in popularity as an alternative to using fossil fuels. Now, in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, scientists report a step toward a "greener" way to generate heat with biomass. Rather than burning it, which releases pollutants, they let fungi break it down to release heat.

Medicine

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Vapors From Some Flavored E-Liquids Contain High Levels of Aldehydes

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Traditional cigarettes pose a well-established risk to smokers' health, but the effects of electronic cigarettes are still being determined. Helping to flesh out this picture, researchers are reporting in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology what happens to e-liquid flavorings when they're heated inside e-cigarettes or electronic nicotine-delivery systems. The study found that when converted into a vapor, some flavorings break down into toxic compounds at levels that exceed occupational safety standards.

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Mimicking Bug Eyes Could Brighten Reflective Signs and Clothes

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That bright, reflective coating used on road signs, bicycles and clothing are important safety measures at night. They help drivers get to their destinations while avoiding bicyclists and pedestrians in low-light conditions. Now, inspired by the structure of insect eyes, scientists have developed new materials that could improve the color and effectiveness of these safeguards. Their report appears in the ACS journal Langmuir.

Medicine

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Cancer Risks in Blacks: 'A Complex, Entangled Web', Many Primary Care Doctors Are Reluctant to Talk About Medical Errors, Can Microbiome Influence Treatment Response, and More in the Cancer News Source

Click here to go directly to the Cancer News Source

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Science for Sweet Tooths

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UBC researchers develop new method to test for antioxidants in chocolate

Science

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Enzyme, antibiotic synthesis

Researchers Tweak Enzyme ‘Assembly Line’ to Improve Antibiotics

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Researchers from North Carolina State University have discovered a way to make pinpoint changes to an enzyme-driven “assembly line” that will enable scientists to improve or change the properties of existing antibiotics as well as create designer compounds.

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, SSRL, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, lightsource, TED Talks, Science, Biological Science, Chemistry, Catalysis, X-ray science, X-ray imaging

‘Brighter Than A Billion Suns’: SLAC Studies Featured in TEDx Talk

Phil Manning and his colleagues have used synchrotron light for nearly a decade to help interpret the chemical signatures locked within fossilized life. Bright X-rays have allowed them to study fossilized worm burrows, recreate pigment patterns in ancient bird feathers, see how Jurassic dinosaur bones heal and image the living chemistry of 50-million year old plant fossils.

Science

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materials analysis, materials discovery, Chemistry & Materials, Ames Laboratory

Ames Laboratory Scientists Create New Compound, First Intermetallic Double Salt with Platinum

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Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory are being credited with creating the first intermetallic double salt with platinum.

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Chemistry, Chemical Reactions, Catalyst, Catalytic, Zeolite, Berkeley, Berkeley Lab, Lawrence Berkeley, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, PNNL, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, FUEL, Biomass, Ethanol, Biofuel, Energy, Petrochemical, Petroleum

Scientists Trace ‘Poisoning’ in Chemical Reactions to the Atomic Scale

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A combination of experiments, including X-ray studies at Berkeley Lab, revealed new details about pesky deposits that can stop chemical reactions vital to fuel production and other processes.

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Protein and Salt Drive Post-Meal Sleepiness

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Sleepiness after a large meal is something we all experience, and new research with fruit flies suggests higher protein and salt content in our food, as well as the volume consumed, can lead to longer naps.

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American Association for the Advancement of Science, Science, Medicine, Health, Genetics, Research, Rutgers, Rutgers University, RU, New Jersey, NJ, AAAS Fellows, Aaas, Environment, Energy, Green Building, Pharmacy, Pharmacology, Melanoma, Chemical Biology, Chemistry, Ecology, Evolution, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Niemann-Pick Type C2 disease, late infantile

Ten Rutgers Professors Named Fellows of American Association for the Advancement of Science

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Ten Rutgers have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), an honor conferred on 381 other experts in the U.S. and abroad. The fellows were chosen by their AAAS peers for efforts to advance science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished, according to the AAAS.

Science

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Fireworks, Senko-hanabi, Summer, sparklers, liquid dynamics, Chemical Reaction, DFD, 69th DFD Annual Meeting, Division of Fluid Dynamics, American Physical Society, APS

Sparkling Firework Droplets

In Japan, many adults hold fond childhood memories of fireworks as a symbol of the summer season. Senko-hanabi, which translates to “sparkling fireworks,” emit a small fireball with streaks of light akin to pine needle structures. As one of the most popular hand-held fireworks since the early Edo period, from 1603 to 1868, they’re renowned for fragile beauty accompanied by a soothing sound. During the 69th DFD meeting, researchers will describe work uncovering the liquid dynamics at play behind Senko-hanabi’s beauty.

Science

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Genomics, Metabolomics, Microbiome, Antibiotics, Antibiotics resistance, Antibiotics discovery

Big Data for Chemistry: New Method Helps Identify Antibiotics in Mass Spectrometry Datasets

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An international team of computer scientists has for the first time developed a method to find antibiotics hidden in huge but still unexplored mass spectrometry datasets. They detailed their new method, called DEREPLICATOR, in the Oct. 31 issue of Nature Chemical Biology.

Science

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Chicxulub, Chicxulub crater, Asteroids, Rocks, Gulf Of Mexico, Dinosaurs, Craters, peak ring, Drilling, Science, Magnetism, Magnetic, Rutgers, Rutgers University, RU, New Jersey, NJ, Habitat, Biosphere, Organisms, Earth, Environment, Crust, Planets, Solar System, MARS, Martian, Hydrothermal, Imperial College London, LIFE, core, granite, porosity, Water, Fossils, European Co

Asteroid Impacts Could Create Habitats for Life

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An international team of 38 scientists, including Rutgers’ Sonia Tikoo, has shown how large asteroid impacts deform rocks and possibly create habitats for early life on Earth and elsewhere.







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