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Science

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Chemistry, Physics, Material Science, Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, Molecular Physics

University of Akron Researchers Find Thin Layers of Water Can Become Ice-Like at Room Temperature

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New research by scientists at The University of Akron (UA) shows that a nanometer-thin layer of water between two charged surfaces exhibits ice-like tendencies that allow it to withstand pressures of hundreds of atmospheres. The discovery could lead to better ways to minimize friction in a variety of settings.

Science

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Research & Development, Award, Chemistry, Nanotechnology

Four Brookhaven Lab Projects Selected as R&D 100 Award Finalists

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Four projects from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory have been selected as finalists for the 2016 R&D 100 awards, which honor the top 100 proven technological advances of the past year as determined by a panel selected by R&D Magazine.

Medicine

Science

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Biology, Microbiology, Virology

Scientists Succeed at Growing Noroviruses in Human Intestinal Cell Cultures in the Lab

The USDA's National Institute of Food and Agriculture supports NoroCORE, a multidisciplinary research collaborative of 30 researchers from 25 universities who are joining forces to understand and control food borne virus risks.

Science

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Chemistry, Physics, Material Science, Nanotechnology, Optics

Electrons at the Speed Limit

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Speed may not be witchcraft, but it is the basis for technologies that often seem like magic. Modern computers, for instance, are as powerful as they are because tiny switches inside them steer electric currents in fractions of a billionth of a second. The incredible data flows of the internet, on the other hand, are only possible because extremely fast electro-optic modulators can send information through fibre-optic cables in the shape of very short light pulses. Today's electronic circuits already routinely work at frequencies of several gigahertz (a billion oscillations per second) up to terahertz (a thousand billion oscillations). The next generation of electronics will therefore, sooner or later have to reach the realm of petahertz, which is a thousand times faster still. If and how electrons can be controlled that fast, however, is still largely unknown. In a groundbreaking experiment, a team led by ETH professor Ursula Keller has now investigated how electrons react to petahert

Medicine

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tissue-engineered liver, Progenitor Cells

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 30-Aug-2016 9:00 AM EDT

Science

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Chemistry, Material Science, Physics, Optics, computer science and engineering, Technology

A Nanoscale Wireless Communication System via Plasmonic Antennas

Chestnut Hill, Mass. (8/25/2016) - The pursuit of next-generation technologies places a premium on producing increased speed and efficiency with components built at scales small enough to function on a computer chip.

Science

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Agriculture, Atmospheric Science, business economics, Chemistry, Physics, Material Science, Mathematics and statistics, technology and engineering

Louisiana Tech University Uses Underground Radar to Locate Post-Katrina Damage

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RUSTON, La. - An innovative underground radar technology developed at Louisiana Tech University is helping the City of Slidell in south Louisiana to identify and document underground infrastructure damage that had gone undetected in the months and years following Hurricane Katrina.

Science

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Collagen, Protein

Symmetry Crucial for Building Key Biomaterial Collagen in the Lab

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Functional human collagen has been impossible to create in the lab. Now, a team of University of Wisconsin—Madison researchers describe what may be the key to growing functional, natural collagen fibers outside of the body: symmetry.

Science

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Chemistry, Nuclear chemistry

FSU Chemistry Professor Explores Outer Regions of Periodic Table

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In the latest edition of the journal Science, Florida State University Professor Thomas Albrecht-Schmitt captures the fundamental chemistry of the element berkelium, or Bk on the periodic table.

Science

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Biochemistry And Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, Awards, Research, Molecular Biology

Award Winners to Speak at the 2017 ASBMB Annual Meeting

Here is a list of the ASBMB's annual award winners.

Science

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Biochemistry, Physics, Material Science, Energy fuels (non petroleum)

Green Light: USU Biochemists Describe Light-Driven Conversion of Greenhouse Gas to Fuel

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By way of a light-driven bacterium, Utah State University biochemists are a step closer to cleanly converting harmful carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion into usable fuels. Using the phototropic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris as a biocatalyst, the scientists generated methane from carbon dioxide in one enzymatic step.

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252nd American Chemical Society National Meeting & Exposition August 21-25, 2016

Anyone can view the press conferences, but to chat online, you must sign in first with a Google Account.

Science

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Funneling Fundamental Particles, Neutrino Experiments, Physicists Discover 'Apparent Departure From the Laws of Thermodynamics', and More in the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP

Click here to go directly to the Physics News Source Sponsored by AIP.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Biology, Medicine/Health (Diabetes)

Insulin Pill Could Make Diabetes Treatment ‘Ouchless’


Every day, millions of Americans with diabetes have to inject themselves with insulin to manage their blood-sugar levels. But less painful alternatives are emerging. Scientists are developing a new way of administering the medicine orally with tiny vesicles that can deliver insulin where it needs to go without a shot. Today, they share their in vivo testing results.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Biology; Medicine/Health (Environmental Health, Public Health

Selecting the Right House Plant Could Improve Indoor Air (Animation)

Indoor air pollution is an important environmental threat to human health, leading to symptoms of “sick building syndrome.” But researchers report that surrounding oneself with certain house plants could combat the potentially harmful effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a main category of these pollutants. Interestingly, they found that certain plants are better at removing particular harmful compounds from the air, suggesting that, with the right plant, indoor air could become cleaner and safer

Medicine

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Nanoparticle That Mimics Salmonella Counteracts Chemotherapy Resistance, Protein’s Role in Cell Division, A Novel MRI Method, and MORE in the Cancer News Source

Click here to go directly to the Cancer News Source

Science

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Scientific Computing, Chemistry, Catalysis

Aleksandra Vojvodic Named MIT Tech Review Innovator Under 35

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Aleksandra Vojvodic has been named one of MIT Technology Review’s 2016 Innovators Under 35, which honors exceptionally talented technologists whose work has great potential to transform the world. A staff scientist at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, she has spent the past six years working at the SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, where she uses theory and computation to help design better catalysts for reactions that generate and store clean energy.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Medicine/Health

Battery You Can Swallow Could Enable Future Ingestible Medical Devices

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Non-toxic, edible batteries could one day power ingestible devices for diagnosing and treating disease. One team reports new progress toward that goal with their batteries made with melanin pigments, naturally found in the skin, hair and eyes.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Energy/Fuel (non-petroleum), Materials (Superconductors/Semiconductors), Nanotechnology/Micromachines), Technology/Engineering/Computer Science

Stretchy Supercapacitors Power Wearable Electronics

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A future of soft robots that wash your dishes or smart T-shirts that power your cell phone may depend on the development of stretchy power sources. But traditional batteries are thick and rigid — not ideal properties for materials that would be used in tiny malleable devices. In a step toward wearable electronics, a team of researchers has produced a stretchy micro-supercapacitor using ribbons of graphene.

Science

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Catalysis, Catalysis & energy conversion, Catalysts, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, institute for integrated catalysis, Science, Biofuels, Nickel, Fundamental Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Catalyst, Catalyst Technology, Chemistry, Renewable Energy, renewable fuel, Biofuel, Biofuel Production

Transformations: Basic Catalysis Enabling Zero-Carbon-Footprint Future, Scale-up of Aviation Biofuels, Five Cents about Nickel Catalysts

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The August 2016 issue of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis' Transformations highlights in catalysis.







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