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Science

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Presidential Early Career Awards , Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, PECASE 2017, President Obama, White House

LLNL Researchers Win Presidential Early Career Awards

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Two Lawrence Livermore National Lab researchers were among the recipients of the prestigious Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), announced in Washington D.C. on Jan. 9.

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High Energy Physics, cern, Higgs Boson, Higg's Boson, Physics, Matter, ATLAS Collaboration, ATLAS experiment, Atlas Detector, Brookhaven National Lab, Brookhaven Nat'l Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Protons, Universe, particle accelerator, particle accelerators, Proton, International Collaboration, international collaborations, Large Hadron Coll

Shattering Protons in High-Energy Collisions Confirms Higgs Boson Production

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At the world’s most powerful particle physics accelerator, physicists confirmed the Higgs boson production rate. The results match our understanding of how the universe works and will help build the data sets to explore the particles’ properties.

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Black Hole, Space And Planetary Science, Satellite, NuSTAR, Astronomy & Space, Galaxy

Southampton Researchers Use High Energy X-Rays to Peer Beneath the Obscuring Skin of Growing Black Holes

A black hole studied and discovered by Peter Boorman, PhD researcher at the University of Southampton, is so hidden that it requires highly sensitive observations in the highest energy X-rays to classify it as obscured. But they give themselves away when material they feed on emits high-energy X-rays that NASA's NuSTAR (Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array) mission can detect. That's how University of Southampton PhD researcher Peter Boorman used NuSTAR to recently identify a gas-enshrouded supermassive black holes located at the centres of nearby galaxy IC 3639 some 175 million light years from Earth.

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NASA, Hubble Space Telescope, Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, TW Hydrae, Protoplanetary Disk, Shadow, circumstellar matter, Planets, Satellites, TW Hya

Hubble Captures 'Shadow Play' Caused by Possible Planet

Astronomers were surprised to see a huge shadow sweeping across a disk of dust and gas encircling the nearby, young star TW Hydrae. They have a bird's-eye view of the disk, because it is tilted face-on to Earth, and the shadow sweeps around the disk like the hands moving around a clock. But, unlike the hands of a clock, the shadow takes 16 years to make one rotation. Hubble has 18 years' worth of observations of the star; therefore, astronomers could assemble a time-lapse movie of the shadow's rotation.

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NASA, Hubble Space Telescope, Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, Cosmic Origins Spectrograph, COS, HD 172555, exocomets, STAR

Hubble Detects 'Exocomets' Taking the Plunge Into a Young Star

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Interstellar forecast for a nearby star: Raining comets! The comets are plunging into the star HD 172555, which resides 95 light-years from Earth. The comets were not seen directly around the star. Astronomers inferred their presence when they used NASA's Hubble Space Telescope to detect gas that is likely the vaporized remnants of their icy nuclei.

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NASA, Hubble Space Telescope, Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph, Voyager 1, voyager 2, Interstellar Medium, ISM, Stars, spectroscopic measurements, Grapevine, Texas, AAS Meeting, GJ686, GJ676.1A, GJ780, GJ754

Hubble Provides Interstellar Road Map for Voyagers' Galactic Trek

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Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have measured the material along the Voyager 1 and 2 probes' trajectories as they move through space. Hubble data, combined with the Voyagers, have also provided new insights into how our sun travels through interstellar space.

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Corals, coordinated behaviour

Corals May Show Complex, Coordinated Behavior

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The individual and the group: insignificant alone, awesome together. Like ants in a colony or neurons of a brain, the collective action of single actors can beautifully coalesce into something more complex than the parts.

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Toads

The Mystery of the Earless Toads

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More than 200 species of “true toads” have fully functional inner ears, but cannot fully use them because they have lost their tympanic middle ears, the part of the ear which transmits sound air pressures from the outside world to the inner ear. These “earless” toads rely on sounds to communicate, so why would they lose a sense that is key to their survival and reproduction?

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anole, adaptive radiation, developmental monitoring

Sticky Toes Provide Clues to Evolution

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Yet, how this key innovation evolved remains a mystery locked within the leathery shell of a lizard egg. Now, Dr. Thomas Sanger at Loyola University in Chicago has developed new techniques to understand more about the process of evolutionary diversification by observing development in real time.

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Pollen, Mosquito, Orchid

Orchids Mimic Human BO to Attract Mosquitoes

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New research shows that orchids relying on mosquitoes for pollination attract them by producing the same odors found in common mosquito blood-hosts. The results of this study will be presented at the annual conference of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in New Orleans, LA on January 7, 2017.

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Lunar Sonic Booms

University of Iowa scientist to give talk about mini shock waves on the moon

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Hurricane, Forecast, Power, Outage, Utilities, soil, Moisture, SMAP

How Soil Moisture Can Help Predict Power Outages Caused by Hurricanes

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In the days before Hurricane Matthew, researchers used satellite maps of soil moisture to help forecast where the power would go out along the East Coast.At the American Geophysical Union meeting this week, they report that their method worked with 91 percent accuracy.

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Northwestern University, Earthquake

Earthquake Faults Are Smarter Than We Usually Think

Northwestern University researchers now have an answer to a vexing age-old question: Why do earthquakes sometimes come in clusters? The research team has developed a new computer model and discovered that earthquake faults are smarter -- in the sense of having better memory -- than seismologists have long assumed.

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Public Willing to Pay to Reduce Toxic Algae – but Maybe Not Enough

A collaboration of universities and government agencies has identified three key agricultural management plans for curtailing harmful algal blooms. They have also identified a looming funding gap for enacting those plans.

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Voice, vocal quality, voice recognition, Acoustics, Linguistics, vocal characteristics, Patricia Keating, Jody Kreiman, UCLA, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA

What Makes Your Voice Yours?

What are the characteristics of the way you say, “hello,” (or anything else for that matter) that makes you recognizable over the phone? Despite the increasing amount of literature on personal voice quality, very little is actually known about how to characterize the sound of an individual speaker. Two researchers from UCLA in Los Angeles, California, Patricia Keating and Jody Kreiman, are joining forces to apply acoustics tools to their linguistics research, investigating this question.

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open office plans, Cognitive Performance, noise distractions, meaningless noise, odd-ball paradigm, Takahiro Tamesue, Yamaguchi University, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA, Acoustics

Study Finds Hearing "Meaningful" Sounds Decreases Performance on Cognitive Tasks

Open office plans are becoming increasingly common in the workplace -- offering a way to optimize available space and encourage dialogue, interaction and collaboration among employees. However, a new study suggests that productive work-related conversations might actually decrease the performance of other employees within earshot -- more so than other random, meaningless noises.

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animal tracking, acoustic beamforming, Conservation, Observation, Mojave Ground Squirrels, Dean L. Hawthorne, William Horn, Cornell University, Coherent Technical Services, Inc., Edwards Air Force Base, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA, Acoustics

Tracking Terrestrial Animals

What does the detection of enemy planes during WWI have to do with locating endangered Mojave Ground Squirrels? They both benefit from a technique called acoustic beamforming which uses multiple devices to find the point of intersection and pinpoint location. A team of researchers is developing a system using this WWI-era technology to detect and locate endangered Mojave Ground Squirrels on Edwards Air Force Base. They aim to assess populations and any impact the base's activities may be having on the population.

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Marine Life, Tracking, acoustic monitoring, autonomous recorder, microphones, Vocalizations, Glider, Selen Fregosi, Cooperative Institute for Marine Resources Studies, Oregon State University, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA, Acoustics

"Mic Check" for Marine Mammals

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Hearing is a vital sense for marine mammals who use it to forage, communicate and navigate. Many of these mammals produce specific vocalizations that can be used to identify the species and track their locations via acoustic monitoring. Traditionally, scientists have used underwater microphones to listen for marine mammals, either on the seafloor or towed behind a boat. But now scientists can use autonomous underwater vehicles, gliders and floats specially equipped with hydrophones, to listen to marine mammals in ways impossible until now.

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Musicians, playing by ear, playing instruments, Learning, brain process, Acoustics, Information Processing, Eriko Aiba, University of Electro-Communications, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA

How Do Musician's Brains Work While Playing?

Musical styles and strengths vary dramatically: Some musicians are better at sight reading music, while others are better at playing by ear. Does this mean that their brains are processing information differently? This is a question posed by Eriko Aiba, an assistant professor in Tokyo, Japan who will present research that delves into the various ways the brain engages in music signal processing.

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Beetles, Invasive Species, Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle, Vegetation, Hawaii, coconut palms, John S. Allen, University of Hawaii , 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Acoustical Society of America, ASA

Using Sound to Stop Destructive Beetles in Their Tracks

What would the paradise of Hawaii be without swaying coconut palms, with succulent fruit that is almost synonymous with the tropical island? Unfortunately, that may be the future of the island unless scientists find some way to stop the destructive Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle which feeds on the coconut palms, stripping them of their leaves and decimating the vegetation. A team of researchers at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu are using acoustics to help to understand this beetle, its habits and movements in order to protect the state’s valuable natural resources.







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