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Science

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Sports Medicine, American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, sports medicine research

AOSSM Presents Prestigious Research Awards and Grants at Annual Meeting

In order to recognize and encourage cutting-edge research in key areas of orthopaedic sports medicine, the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) will present research awards and grants during

Science

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Computer Vision Research, Machine Learning, Artificial Intelligence, Uncanny Valley

Lip-Syncing Obama: New Tools Turn Audio Clips Into Realistic Video

Machine learning algorithms developed by UW computer vision researchers can create realistic videos from audio files alone - including speeches by President Barack Obama.

Life

Arts and Humanities

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Acoustics, cave paintings, acoustic study, Resonance, reverberation, Paleolithic, cave art, David Lubman, Acoustics ’17 Boston

Acoustic Scientist Sounds Off About the Location of Cave Paintings

One popular theory about the Paleolithic cave paintings proposes that sites were chosen based on the acoustics in the caves. The originators of the theory reported a causal connection between the “points of resonance” in three French caves and the position of Paleolithic cave paintings. David Lubman, an acoustic scientist and fellow of ASA, will share some of the insights from his research during Acoustics ’17 Boston, held June 25-29, in Boston, Massachusetts.

Science

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Running, running injuries, Biomechanics, recreational running, Vibrations, Impact, shock propagation, repetitive shock, Delphine Chadefaux, Acoustics ’17 Boston

Biomechanical Acoustics Study Sheds Light on Running Injuries

Devoted runners suffer from a surprisingly high rate of injury. One reason for these injuries is that runners endure many shocks from the impact of running, and these cause vibrations that travel from the foot throughout the entire body. Delphine Chadefaux, a post-doctoral researcher who focuses on acoustics and biomechanics, studies these repetitive shocks and investigates how runners adapt their running patterns according to running conditions and will share some of the insights from her research during Acoustics ’17 Boston.

Science

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office space, open floor plan, office acoustics, office noise, soundproof, curtains, acoustical impedances, sound dampening, Jonas Schira, Gerriets GmbH , Acoustics ’17 Boston

Curtains for Privacy and Quiet

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Anyone who works in an office with an open floor plan becomes aware of a major downside of these otherwise collaborative spaces: It is impossible to hold confidential meetings with colleagues. One solution developed by a German textile manufacturer is a system of sound-insulating curtains to create temporary, sound-proofed “variable zones” within the open office, where private conversations can occur. The system will be described by Jonas Schira of Gerriets GmbH during Acoustics ’17 Boston.

Science

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Virtual Reality, personalized audio, mixed reality, head related transfer functions, personalization, spatial sound, Acoustics, Ivan J. Tashey, Hannes Gamper, Microsoft’s Audio and Acoustics Research Group, Acoustics ’17 Boston

Creating a Personalized, Immersive Audio Environment

The way you hear and interpret the sounds around you changes as you move. That’s how sound in the real world works. Now imagine if it worked that way while you were listening to a recording of a concert or playing a video game in virtual reality. During Acoustics ’17 Boston, Ivan J. Tashev and Hannes Gamper, with Microsoft’s Audio and Acoustics Research Group, will explain how they are using head related transfer functions (HRTF) to create an immersive sound environment.

Science

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blood-brain barrier, Noninvasive, Ultrasound, Acoustics, Drug Delivery, cavitation agents, acoustic emissions, Miles M. Aron, University of Oxford, University of Twente, Acoustics ’17 Boston

Tiny Bubbles Offer Sound Solution for Drug Delivery

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The blood-brain barrier protects the brain and central nervous system from harmful chemicals circulating in the blood but also prevents delivery of drugs that could help treat patients with brain cancers and brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. With recent advances in technology, the blood-brain barrier can now be opened safely, noninvasively and in a targeted manner using ultrasound. One of the newest approaches aiming to advance this research will be presented during Acoustics ’17 Boston.

Science

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spatial audio, spatial acoustics, acoustic simulation, 3-D visualization, Virtual Reality, multimodal sound, ghost orchestra, personalized audio, Brian F. Katz, Pierre and Marie Curie University, Acoustics ’17 Boston

Seeing With Your Ears

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Paris’ Cathedral of Notre Dame has a ghost orchestra that is always performing, thanks to a sophisticated, multidisciplinary acoustics research project that will be presented during Acoustics ’17 Boston. In the project, computer models use recordings from a live concert held at the cathedral and detailed room acoustic simulations to produce a novel type of audience experience: a virtual recreation of the live performance using spatial audio and virtual reality.

Science

Life

Business

Law and Public Policy

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Risk Analysis, Risk Management, Auto, Automobile, Insurance, auto insurance, driverless cars, cars

Study Assesses Risk in a Changing Insurance Market for Driverless Vehicles

Despite projections, insurers will likely play a key role in supporting the safe deployment, adoption and sustainability of driverless cars. The relatively unknown nature, likelihood and extent of driverless accidents presents risk management challenges to both the automotive and insurance industries. Future motor policies may require non-traditional risk management.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

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Risk Analysis, risk aversion, Childbirth, Babies, Gender, Newborn, Parenting, Expecting Mothers

Parents of Newborn Daughters Take Fewer Risks Study Suggests

This study explores the effect of learning a child’s gender on parents’ attitudes towards risky behaviors. In this study, the first of its kind, the authors gathered prenatal and post-birth data from the pediatric wards of hospitals in both the United Kingdom and Ukraine, allowing for longitudinal and cross-sectional analyses of those attitudes.







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