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Scientific Meetings

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Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Biology; Medicine/Health (Environmental Health, Public Health

Selecting the Right House Plant Could Improve Indoor Air (Animation)

Indoor air pollution is an important environmental threat to human health, leading to symptoms of “sick building syndrome.” But researchers report that surrounding oneself with certain house plants could combat the potentially harmful effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a main category of these pollutants. Interestingly, they found that certain plants are better at removing particular harmful compounds from the air, suggesting that, with the right plant, indoor air could become cleaner and safer

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Biology, Medicine/Health (Diabetes)

Insulin Pill Could Make Diabetes Treatment ‘Ouchless’


Every day, millions of Americans with diabetes have to inject themselves with insulin to manage their blood-sugar levels. But less painful alternatives are emerging. Scientists are developing a new way of administering the medicine orally with tiny vesicles that can deliver insulin where it needs to go without a shot. Today, they share their in vivo testing results.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Medicine/Health

Battery You Can Swallow Could Enable Future Ingestible Medical Devices

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Non-toxic, edible batteries could one day power ingestible devices for diagnosing and treating disease. One team reports new progress toward that goal with their batteries made with melanin pigments, naturally found in the skin, hair and eyes.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Energy/Fuel (non-petroleum), Materials (Superconductors/Semiconductors), Nanotechnology/Micromachines), Technology/Engineering/Computer Science

Stretchy Supercapacitors Power Wearable Electronics

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A future of soft robots that wash your dishes or smart T-shirts that power your cell phone may depend on the development of stretchy power sources. But traditional batteries are thick and rigid — not ideal properties for materials that would be used in tiny malleable devices. In a step toward wearable electronics, a team of researchers has produced a stretchy micro-supercapacitor using ribbons of graphene.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Atmospheric Science (Climate; Pollution/Remediation), Medicine/Health (Environmental Health; Public Health), Technology/Engineering/Computer Science (Vehicles)

How Cars Could Meet Future Emissions Standards: Focus on Cold Starts

Car emissions is a high-stakes issue, as last year’s Volkswagen scandal demonstrated. Pressure to meet tightening standards led the carmaker to cheat on emissions tests. But wrongdoing aside, how are automakers going to realistically meet future, tougher emissions requirements to reduce their impact on the climate? Researchers report today that a vehicle’s cold start — at least in gasoline-powered cars — is the best target for future design changes.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials; Polymer Chemistry)

Reducing Tire Waste by Using Completely Degradable, Synthetic Rubber

Scrap tires have been on environmentalists’ blacklist for decades. They pile up in landfills, have fed enormous toxic fires, harbor pests and get burned for fuel. Scientists trying to rid us of this scourge have developed a new way to make synthetic rubber. And once this material is discarded, it can be easily degraded back to its chemical building blocks and reused in new tires and other products.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Biology

New Device Could Help Improve Taste of Foods Low in Fat, Sugar and Salt

Scientists may be closing in on a way to let consumers savor the sweet taste of cake, cookies and other culinary delights without the sugar rush. In preliminary tests using a new device developed in-house that allows them to screen for odor compounds in real foods, they have isolated several natural aromatic molecules that could be used to trick our brains into believing that desserts and other foods contain more fat, sugar or salt than they actually do.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Medicine/Health (Critical Care/Emergency Medicine; Sports Medicine [Trauma/Injury])

Nanoparticles That Speed Blood Clotting May Someday Save Lives

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Whether severe trauma occurs on the battlefield or the highway, saving lives often comes down to stopping the bleeding as quickly as possible. Many methods for controlling external bleeding exist, but at this point, only surgery can halt blood loss inside the body from injury to internal organs. Now, researchers have developed nanoparticles that congregate wherever injury occurs in the body to help it form blood clots, and they’ve validated these particles in test tubes and in vivo.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials), Biology (Biomedical/Environmental/Chemical Engineering), Medicine/Health (Cardiology)

After the Heart Attack: Injectable Gels Could Prevent Future Heart Failure (Video)

During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells within the tissue. But the damage doesn’t end after the crushing pain subsides. Instead, the heart’s walls thin out, the organ becomes enlarged, and scar tissue forms. If nothing is done, the patient can eventually experience heart failure. But scientists now report they have developed gels that, in animal tests, can be injected into the heart to shore up weakened areas and prevent heart failure.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Neurochemistry), Biology (Biotechnology; Physiology), Medicine/Health (Addiction; Neurobiology), Social/Behavioral Science

Watching Thoughts — and Addiction — Form in the Brain

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More than a hundred years ago, Ivan Pavlov conducted what would become one of the most famous and influential psychology studies — he conditioned dogs to salivate at the ringing of a bell. Now, scientists are able to see in real time what happens in the brains of live animals during this classic experiment with a new technique. Ultimately, the approach could lead to a greater understanding of how we learn, and develop and break addictions.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials, Materials, Energy/Fuel

Fungi Recycle Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries

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Although rechargeable batteries in smartphones, cars and tablets can be charged again and again, they don’t last forever. Old batteries often wind up in landfills or incinerators, potentially harming the environment. And valuable materials remain locked inside. Now, a team of researchers is turning to naturally occurring fungi to drive an environmentally friendly recycling process to extract cobalt and lithium from tons of waste batteries.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Agriculture (Food/Food Science)

Edible Food Packaging Made From Milk Proteins (Video)

At the grocery store, most foods — meats, breads, cheeses, snacks — come wrapped in plastic packaging. Not only does this create a lot of non-recyclable, non-biodegradable waste, but thin plastic films are not great at preventing spoilage. And some plastics are suspected of leaching potentially harmful compounds into food. To address these issues, scientists are now developing a packaging film made of milk proteins — and it is even edible.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials, Optics), Biology

Squid, Jellyfish and Wrinkled Skin Inspire Materials for Anti-Glare Screens and Encryption

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What do squid and jellyfish skin have in common with human skin? All three have inspired a team of chemists to create materials that change color or texture in response to variations in their surroundings. These materials could be used for encrypting secret messages, creating anti-glare surfaces, or detecting moisture or damage, they say.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Biology (Biochemistry), Medicine/Health (Dermatology)

Stopping Scars Before They Form

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Most people start racking up scars from an early age with scraped knees and elbows. While many of these fade over time, more severe types such as keloids and scars from burns are largely untreatable. These types of scars are associated with permanent functional loss and, in severe cases, carry the stigma of disfigurement. Now scientists are developing new compounds that could stop scars from forming in the first place.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Science, Medicine/Health (Nutrition/Nutrients, Diet/Body Weight, Cardiology, Metabolism/Metabolic Diseases, Diabetes

Citrus Fruits Could Help Prevent Obesity-Related Heart Disease, Liver Disease, Diabetes

Oranges and other citrus fruits are good for you — they contain plenty of vitamins and substances, such as antioxidants, that can help keep you healthy. Now a group of researchers reports that these fruits also help prevent harmful effects of obesity in mice fed a Western-style, high-fat diet.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Pharmaceutical Sciences), Medicine/Health (Public Health)

Paper-Based Device Spots Falsified or Degraded Medications (Video)

The developing world is awash in substandard, degraded or falsified medications, which can either directly harm users or deprive them of needed treatment. And with internet sales of medications on the rise, people everywhere are increasingly at risk. So, a team of researchers has developed a simple, inexpensive paper-based device to screen suspicious medications.

Science

Channels:

WIFI, Backscatter, Internet of Things, Wireless Communication, Implantable Devices

Interscatter Enables 1st Implanted Devices, Smart Contact Lenses, Credit Cards That ‘Talk’ Wi-Fi

"Interscatter" communication developed by University of Washington engineers allows power-limited devices such as brain implants, contact lenses, credit cards and smaller wearable electronics to talk to everyday devices such as smartphones and watches.

Science

Channels:

computer science and engineering, Electrical Engineering/Electronics, Internet, Research & Development, Software Engineering, technology and engineering, Telecommunication

Researchers Map Netflix's Content Delivery Network for the First Time

Scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have revealed the network infrastructure used by Netflix for its content delivery, by mimicking the film request process from all over the world and analysing the responses.

Science

Channels:

Web, Internet, web tracking, Web Security, Internet Security, Internet privacy, Computer Science, History

Unearthing trackers of the past: UW computer scientists reveal the history of third-party web tracking

At the USENIX Security Conference in Austin, Texas, a team of University of Washington researchers on Aug. 12 presented the first-ever comprehensive analysis of third-party web tracking across three decades and a new tool, TrackingExcavator, which they developed to extract and analyze tracking behaviors on a given web page. They saw a four-fold increase in third-party tracking on top sites from 1996 to 2016, and mapped the growing complexity of trackers stretching back decades.

Science

Channels:

Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials), Atmospheric Science (Atmospheric Chemistry, Climate, Weather/Storms, Pollution/Remediation), Earth Science (Hydrology/Water Resources, Oceanography), Biology (Ecology/Environment)

Plenaries at American Chemical Society Meeting Will Focus on Measurements, the Climate

Scientists, in three plenary talks, will explore a variety of subjects related to the “Chemistry of the People, by the People, for the People” theme of the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society. The meeting will take place August 21-25 in Philadelphia.







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