Curated News:

Scientific Meetings

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Voice, vocal quality, voice recognition, Acoustics, Linguistics, vocal characteristics, Patricia Keating, Jody Kreiman, UCLA, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA

What Makes Your Voice Yours?

What are the characteristics of the way you say, “hello,” (or anything else for that matter) that makes you recognizable over the phone? Despite the increasing amount of literature on personal voice quality, very little is actually known about how to characterize the sound of an individual speaker. Two researchers from UCLA in Los Angeles, California, Patricia Keating and Jody Kreiman, are joining forces to apply acoustics tools to their linguistics research, investigating this question.

Science

Channels:

open office plans, Cognitive Performance, noise distractions, meaningless noise, odd-ball paradigm, Takahiro Tamesue, Yamaguchi University, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA, Acoustics

Study Finds Hearing "Meaningful" Sounds Decreases Performance on Cognitive Tasks

Open office plans are becoming increasingly common in the workplace -- offering a way to optimize available space and encourage dialogue, interaction and collaboration among employees. However, a new study suggests that productive work-related conversations might actually decrease the performance of other employees within earshot -- more so than other random, meaningless noises.

Science

Channels:

animal tracking, acoustic beamforming, Conservation, Observation, Mojave Ground Squirrels, Dean L. Hawthorne, William Horn, Cornell University, Coherent Technical Services, Inc., Edwards Air Force Base, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA, Acoustics

Tracking Terrestrial Animals

What does the detection of enemy planes during WWI have to do with locating endangered Mojave Ground Squirrels? They both benefit from a technique called acoustic beamforming which uses multiple devices to find the point of intersection and pinpoint location. A team of researchers is developing a system using this WWI-era technology to detect and locate endangered Mojave Ground Squirrels on Edwards Air Force Base. They aim to assess populations and any impact the base's activities may be having on the population.

Science

Channels:

Marine Life, Tracking, acoustic monitoring, autonomous recorder, microphones, Vocalizations, Glider, Selen Fregosi, Cooperative Institute for Marine Resources Studies, Oregon State University, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA, Acoustics

"Mic Check" for Marine Mammals

ASA-Fregosi-seaglider.JPG

Hearing is a vital sense for marine mammals who use it to forage, communicate and navigate. Many of these mammals produce specific vocalizations that can be used to identify the species and track their locations via acoustic monitoring. Traditionally, scientists have used underwater microphones to listen for marine mammals, either on the seafloor or towed behind a boat. But now scientists can use autonomous underwater vehicles, gliders and floats specially equipped with hydrophones, to listen to marine mammals in ways impossible until now.

Science

Channels:

Musicians, playing by ear, playing instruments, Learning, brain process, Acoustics, Information Processing, Eriko Aiba, University of Electro-Communications, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA

How Do Musician's Brains Work While Playing?

Musical styles and strengths vary dramatically: Some musicians are better at sight reading music, while others are better at playing by ear. Does this mean that their brains are processing information differently? This is a question posed by Eriko Aiba, an assistant professor in Tokyo, Japan who will present research that delves into the various ways the brain engages in music signal processing.

Science

Channels:

Beetles, Invasive Species, Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle, Vegetation, Hawaii, coconut palms, John S. Allen, University of Hawaii , 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, Acoustical Society of America, ASA

Using Sound to Stop Destructive Beetles in Their Tracks

What would the paradise of Hawaii be without swaying coconut palms, with succulent fruit that is almost synonymous with the tropical island? Unfortunately, that may be the future of the island unless scientists find some way to stop the destructive Coconut Rhinoceros Beetle which feeds on the coconut palms, stripping them of their leaves and decimating the vegetation. A team of researchers at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu are using acoustics to help to understand this beetle, its habits and movements in order to protect the state’s valuable natural resources.

Science

Channels:

bats, Echolocation, mouth shape, facial muscles, Neuromuscular, sonar beam forming, Michael Smotherman, Texas A&M, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA

What Role Does Mouth Shape Play for Echolocating Bats?

While studying bats, researchers noticed a large group of muscles running straight down the middle of the top of the bat’s skull. A set of muscles like this is quite unusual in size and location for a small mammal, so they questioned their purpose. During the 172nd ASA meeting, the researchers will present their work exploring the muscle's complex activity patterns during sonar performance.

Science

Channels:

CORN, corn production, Crop Production, corn stalk, Plant Growth, Plant Science, Mechanical Engineering, Douglas Cook, Roger Elmore, Justin McMechan, New York University, University Of Nebraska, 172nd Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, ASA

Can You Hear the Corn Grow? Yes!

Corn is the leading grain crop in the U.S. but a lack of understanding about the mechanics involved in wind-induced corn stalk failure has hindered further improvements in corn production. Now, by applying mechanical engineering tools and techniques, a group of engineers and plant scientists are making headway addressing this problem. The work will be presented at the 172nd ASA meeting.

Science

Channels:

blood spatter, blood back spatter, Forensic Science, gunshot wounds, Droplets, bloodstain pattern analysis, Patrick Comiskey, Alexander Yarin, Sungu Kim, Daniel Attinger, University Of Illinois, DFD, Division of Fluid Dynamics, American Physical Society, APS, 69th DFD Annual Meeting

Investigating Blood Back Spatter

The popularity of forensics and crime scene investigation fueled by a glut of television programs has familiarized many of us with the basics of forensic medicine. However, not much is, in fact, understood about blood back spatter. A team of researchers from the University of Illinois and Iowa State University is exploring the science behind blood back spatter using fluid dynamics to develop a theoretical model for predicting and interpreting blood spatter from gunshot wounds, and it could significantly impact the field of forensic science. The work will be presented at the 69th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics held in Portland, Oregon, Nov. 20-22, 2016.

Science

Channels:

Fireworks, Senko-hanabi, Summer, sparklers, liquid dynamics, Chemical Reaction, DFD, 69th DFD Annual Meeting, Division of Fluid Dynamics, American Physical Society, APS

Sparkling Firework Droplets

In Japan, many adults hold fond childhood memories of fireworks as a symbol of the summer season. Senko-hanabi, which translates to “sparkling fireworks,” emit a small fireball with streaks of light akin to pine needle structures. As one of the most popular hand-held fireworks since the early Edo period, from 1603 to 1868, they’re renowned for fragile beauty accompanied by a soothing sound. During the 69th DFD meeting, researchers will describe work uncovering the liquid dynamics at play behind Senko-hanabi’s beauty.

Science

Channels:

Breastfeeding, Infant Feeding, Lactation, Biomimetic, mechanobiology, Fluid Dynamics, Nicole Danos, Rebecca German, Northeastern Ohio Medical University, DFD, Division of Fluid Dynamics, 69th DFD Annual Meeting, American Physical Society, APS

Understanding the Mechanics of Breastfeeding

Breastfeeding is a topic that creates discussion and at times even controversy. However, some basic questions about its biology still remain. For instance, does successful infant feeding depend on the mechanics of the breast and, conversely, does breast health depend on breastfeeding? It has been virtually impossible to study these complex dynamics and the delicate interplay that makes breastfeeding possible, but a pair of researchers are working together to build a biomimetic breast that will allow scientists to study how the breast behaves during its primary function: infant feeding.

Science

Channels:

Swimming, Stroke, stroke efficiency, front crawl, drag coefficient, Fluid Dynamics, Wilem van de Water, Josje van Houwelingern, Dennis Wilemsenm, Wim Paul Breugem, Jerry Westerweel, Rene Delfos, Ernst Jan Grift, Eindhoven University of Technology, Delft University of Technology, J.M. Burgers Centre for Fluid Dynamics, DFD, Division of Fluid Dynamics, 69th D

Paddle or Rake to Improve Your Swimming Stroke?

Image-VanHouwelingen.jpg

Note to elite swimmers: Are you looking for a competitive edge in the hydrodynamics of your front crawl?

Science

Channels:

cat tongue, Velcro, hooks, Fasteners, Biomimetic, grip, Fluid Dynamics, Alexis Noel, Andrea Martinez, Hyewon Jung, Ting-Wen Tsai , David Hu, Georgia Tech, DFD, Division of Fluid Dynamics, 69th DFD Annual Meeting, American Physical Society, APS

Cat Tongues Are Even 'Handier' Than You Imagined

Have you ever taken a good look at a cat’s tongue? If so, you may have noticed the tiny, sharp “spines” on its surface.

Science

Channels:

Bubbles, Sinking, Archimedes, complex fluids, Fluid Dynamics, Jeremy Koch, Randy Ewoldt, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, DFD, Division of Fluid Dynamics, 69th DFD Annual Meeting, American Physical Society, APS

Archimedes' Law of Buoyancy Turned Upside Down

EwoldtImage.png

A team at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, exploring how air bubbles rise within a complex fluid, like those found while processing wet concrete, wondered if they could actually get them to sink instead by shaking the mixture in the right way. During the 69th DFD meeting, the researchers will present their work studying bubbles within complex fluids.

Science

Channels:

Boston Molasses Flood, Viscosity, Temperature, Fluid Dynamics, history and science, DFD, 69th DFD Annual Meeting, Division of Fluid Dynamics, American Physical Society, APS

Molasses Creates a Sticky Situation

Fluid dynamics met history for a team of researchers who studied the Boston Molasses Flood, a disaster that claimed 21 lives, injured 150 and flattened buildings in the Commercial Street area of Boston in 1919. During the 69th APS Division of Fluid Dynamics Meeting, a trio of fluid dynamics physicists at Harvard University will explain how they were inspired to study this event by a group of undergraduates who produced a parody rap video about the flood for a project in their fluid dynamics course. The trio examined this historic, yet not well known, event from a scientific perspective.

Science

Channels:

Wind Energy, Drones, Wind Farm, Optimization, Wind Turbines, Efficiency, Balaji Subramanian, Ndaona Chokani , Reza Abhari, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Fluid Dynamics, DFD, Division of Fluid Dynamics, 69th DFD Annual Meeting, American Physical Society, APS

Instrumented Drone Measurements Help Wind Farmers Site Turbines to Achieve Greater Efficiency

DFD-Chokani-drones-view.jpg

Wind energy is a key part of the global energy future, expanding rapidly throughout the world in onshore and offshore settings. But to be sustainable, large scale, multi-megawatt (multi-MW) wind farming’s economic efficiencies need to be maximized -- and knowing where to place the turbines within the wind farm is a first step. Bring on the drones. Moreover, design novel instrumented drones with a suite of sensors capable of gathering precise field data in the complex flow and terrain of an actual wind farm. This was the approach of researchers from Switzerland.

Science

Channels:

Research Finds Zika Virus Can Live for Hours on Hard, Non-Porous Surfaces

The Zika virus is most commonly transmitted in humans as the result of a bite from an infected mosquito or from an infected human to another human. What is not well known is that the virus also can be transmitted via the environment if an individual is pricked with an infected needle or has an open cut and comes in contact with the live virus. While there are no known cases to date of the general public being infected with the Zika virus through the environment, there has been at least one documented case of laboratory acquired Zika virus infection.

Science

Channels:

cardiovascuar disease, Vascular Dementia, Kidney Disease, Proton Pump Inhibitor, PPIs, American Heart Association, Heartburn, gastroesophageal reflux, GERD

Houston Methodist Researcher Recognized by AHA’s Circulation Research Editorial Board

Endothelial_exposed_colorshift_HMhomepage.jpg

Research published by a Houston Methodist team led by John Cooke, M.D., Ph.D., received high accolades at this year’s American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

Medicine

Channels:

ACR annual meeting, myocardial inflammation, Rheumatic Disease, Rheumatoid Arthris, cardiovascuar disease, Disease Modifying Drugs, Dmard, DMARDs, Rheumatology, RA, Coronary Artery Disease, CVD, articular inflammation

Myocardial Inflammation Elevated in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients, but Disease-Modifying Therapy Can Improve It

Two new studies measure the prevalence of myocardial inflammation in RA patients without known cardiovascular disease, assess how it is associated with high disease activity and show how disease-modifying therapy may decrease this type of inflammation, according to new research findings presented this week at the ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.

Medicine

Channels:

ACR annual meeting, Juvenile Arthritis, JIA, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis, Tumor Necrosis Factor, TNF, Malignancy Associated, Inhibitors, rheumatolgy, Rheumatic Disease, TNFi, Arthritis

TNF Inhibitor Use Doesn’t Appear to Increase Malignancy Risk in Children with Juvenile Arthritis

Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, a group of biologic drugs used to treat children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are not associated with a significantly increased risk of cancer, according to new research findings presented this week at the ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in Washington.







Chat now!