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Presidential Debate: Expert Panel Gives Scientific Analysis of Candidates' Performances

Four expert panelists each day will present their analyses and answer your questions live and face-to-face. This event will be virtual. You can attend with any device -- PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone or Android device (with a webcam) – anywhere with good bandwidth. To participate (ask questions) in the meeting, you must be on video, just as a normal news conference. Register below for guaranteed seating; there is limited seating in the virtual room. Eight experts (four at each event) will present their analyses. The diverse expert team (7 universities and an institute) will analyze both candidates during the debates for their gestures, facial expressions (including smiles--number, type, appropriateness, etc.), posture, language, including sentiment, tone, inflammatory language, repetition, vocabulary, sentence structure, metaphors, framing, themes, suggestions, subtlety, nuance, honesty (deceit/lies—explicit and implicit), transparency, gender issues, and more...

Science

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Electric Vehicles, Engineering, Range, range anxiety, Technology, R & D, wide-bandgap semiconductors, Semiconductors, Energy

New Tech to Boost Electric Vehicle Efficiency, Range

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Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a new type of inverter device with greater efficiency in a smaller, lighter package – which will improve the fuel-efficiency and range of hybrid and electric vehicles.

Science

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Renewable Energy, Battery, Electrochemical, Electrochemistry, Prime, Scientific Meeting, Energy Storage, Electric Vehicles, Lithium Batteries, Lithium Ion Battery, Scientific conference

Pioneering Scientists in Battery Technology, Renewable Energy to Be Featured at PRiME 2016

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PRiME is the largest, most significant research conference of its kind in the world. Learn more about presentations to be delivered by pioneering researchers in renewable energy, biomedical, sensors, and more.

Science

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fitness tracking, personal informatics, Human centered design

Life After Fitbit: Appealing to Those Who Feel Guilty vs. Free

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Is life better or worse after sticking your Fitbit in a drawer? University of Washington engineers surveyed hundreds of people who had abandoned self-tracking tools and found emotions ranged from guilt to indifference to relief that the tracking experience was over.

Science

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3-D printing, Smartphone, Intellectual Property, hack, Security, Electromagnetic, Acoustic, cyber attack, Aerospace, Medical Device, Cybersecurity

Smartphone Hacks 3-D Printer by Measuring ‘Leaked’ Energy and Acoustic Waves

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University at Buffalo researchers illustrate how smartphones, due to their ubiquity and sophisticated gadgetry, can easily hack 3-D printers by measuring ‘leaked’ energy and acoustic waves that emanate from the printers. The work is eye-opening because it shows how anyone with a smartphone — from a disgruntled employee to an industrial spy — might steal intellectual property from an unsuspecting business.

Science

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endophyte, Alfalfa, Cattle, Forage, Fungus

Taking Advantage of Plants’ Little Fungal Helpers

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Researchers at The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation are working to harness the power of endophytes. The initiative, Forage365, aims to help farmers provide livestock with year-round grazing.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Biology; Medicine/Health (Environmental Health, Public Health

Selecting the Right House Plant Could Improve Indoor Air (Animation)

Indoor air pollution is an important environmental threat to human health, leading to symptoms of “sick building syndrome.” But researchers report that surrounding oneself with certain house plants could combat the potentially harmful effects of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), a main category of these pollutants. Interestingly, they found that certain plants are better at removing particular harmful compounds from the air, suggesting that, with the right plant, indoor air could become cleaner and safer

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Biology, Medicine/Health (Diabetes)

Insulin Pill Could Make Diabetes Treatment ‘Ouchless’


Every day, millions of Americans with diabetes have to inject themselves with insulin to manage their blood-sugar levels. But less painful alternatives are emerging. Scientists are developing a new way of administering the medicine orally with tiny vesicles that can deliver insulin where it needs to go without a shot. Today, they share their in vivo testing results.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Medicine/Health

Battery You Can Swallow Could Enable Future Ingestible Medical Devices

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Non-toxic, edible batteries could one day power ingestible devices for diagnosing and treating disease. One team reports new progress toward that goal with their batteries made with melanin pigments, naturally found in the skin, hair and eyes.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Energy/Fuel (non-petroleum), Materials (Superconductors/Semiconductors), Nanotechnology/Micromachines), Technology/Engineering/Computer Science

Stretchy Supercapacitors Power Wearable Electronics

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A future of soft robots that wash your dishes or smart T-shirts that power your cell phone may depend on the development of stretchy power sources. But traditional batteries are thick and rigid — not ideal properties for materials that would be used in tiny malleable devices. In a step toward wearable electronics, a team of researchers has produced a stretchy micro-supercapacitor using ribbons of graphene.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Atmospheric Science (Climate; Pollution/Remediation), Medicine/Health (Environmental Health; Public Health), Technology/Engineering/Computer Science (Vehicles)

How Cars Could Meet Future Emissions Standards: Focus on Cold Starts

Car emissions is a high-stakes issue, as last year’s Volkswagen scandal demonstrated. Pressure to meet tightening standards led the carmaker to cheat on emissions tests. But wrongdoing aside, how are automakers going to realistically meet future, tougher emissions requirements to reduce their impact on the climate? Researchers report today that a vehicle’s cold start — at least in gasoline-powered cars — is the best target for future design changes.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials; Polymer Chemistry)

Reducing Tire Waste by Using Completely Degradable, Synthetic Rubber

Scrap tires have been on environmentalists’ blacklist for decades. They pile up in landfills, have fed enormous toxic fires, harbor pests and get burned for fuel. Scientists trying to rid us of this scourge have developed a new way to make synthetic rubber. And once this material is discarded, it can be easily degraded back to its chemical building blocks and reused in new tires and other products.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Biology

New Device Could Help Improve Taste of Foods Low in Fat, Sugar and Salt

Scientists may be closing in on a way to let consumers savor the sweet taste of cake, cookies and other culinary delights without the sugar rush. In preliminary tests using a new device developed in-house that allows them to screen for odor compounds in real foods, they have isolated several natural aromatic molecules that could be used to trick our brains into believing that desserts and other foods contain more fat, sugar or salt than they actually do.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Medicine/Health (Critical Care/Emergency Medicine; Sports Medicine [Trauma/Injury])

Nanoparticles That Speed Blood Clotting May Someday Save Lives

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Whether severe trauma occurs on the battlefield or the highway, saving lives often comes down to stopping the bleeding as quickly as possible. Many methods for controlling external bleeding exist, but at this point, only surgery can halt blood loss inside the body from injury to internal organs. Now, researchers have developed nanoparticles that congregate wherever injury occurs in the body to help it form blood clots, and they’ve validated these particles in test tubes and in vivo.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials), Biology (Biomedical/Environmental/Chemical Engineering), Medicine/Health (Cardiology)

After the Heart Attack: Injectable Gels Could Prevent Future Heart Failure (Video)

During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells within the tissue. But the damage doesn’t end after the crushing pain subsides. Instead, the heart’s walls thin out, the organ becomes enlarged, and scar tissue forms. If nothing is done, the patient can eventually experience heart failure. But scientists now report they have developed gels that, in animal tests, can be injected into the heart to shore up weakened areas and prevent heart failure.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Neurochemistry), Biology (Biotechnology; Physiology), Medicine/Health (Addiction; Neurobiology), Social/Behavioral Science

Watching Thoughts — and Addiction — Form in the Brain

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More than a hundred years ago, Ivan Pavlov conducted what would become one of the most famous and influential psychology studies — he conditioned dogs to salivate at the ringing of a bell. Now, scientists are able to see in real time what happens in the brains of live animals during this classic experiment with a new technique. Ultimately, the approach could lead to a greater understanding of how we learn, and develop and break addictions.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials, Materials, Energy/Fuel

Fungi Recycle Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries

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Although rechargeable batteries in smartphones, cars and tablets can be charged again and again, they don’t last forever. Old batteries often wind up in landfills or incinerators, potentially harming the environment. And valuable materials remain locked inside. Now, a team of researchers is turning to naturally occurring fungi to drive an environmentally friendly recycling process to extract cobalt and lithium from tons of waste batteries.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Agriculture (Food/Food Science)

Edible Food Packaging Made From Milk Proteins (Video)

At the grocery store, most foods — meats, breads, cheeses, snacks — come wrapped in plastic packaging. Not only does this create a lot of non-recyclable, non-biodegradable waste, but thin plastic films are not great at preventing spoilage. And some plastics are suspected of leaching potentially harmful compounds into food. To address these issues, scientists are now developing a packaging film made of milk proteins — and it is even edible.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences (Materials, Optics), Biology

Squid, Jellyfish and Wrinkled Skin Inspire Materials for Anti-Glare Screens and Encryption

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What do squid and jellyfish skin have in common with human skin? All three have inspired a team of chemists to create materials that change color or texture in response to variations in their surroundings. These materials could be used for encrypting secret messages, creating anti-glare surfaces, or detecting moisture or damage, they say.

Science

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Chemistry/Physics/Materials Sciences, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Biology (Biochemistry), Medicine/Health (Dermatology)

Stopping Scars Before They Form

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Most people start racking up scars from an early age with scraped knees and elbows. While many of these fade over time, more severe types such as keloids and scars from burns are largely untreatable. These types of scars are associated with permanent functional loss and, in severe cases, carry the stigma of disfigurement. Now scientists are developing new compounds that could stop scars from forming in the first place.







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