Curated News:

Scientific Meetings

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Citrus, Peel, exocarp, Microjet, Fluid Dynamics, oil glands, citrus fruit, jetting behavior, Nicholas Smith, Andrew Dickerson, University of Central Florida, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

Bursting Citrus Peel Oil Glands Inspire New Approach for Microjetting Fluids

When was the last time you took a close look at an orange, lime or lemon peel? Outer citrus peels are covered with tiny oil glands or cavities that can explode in an outward direction, often spraying toward you, if bent in an attempt to gain access to the inner fruit. Researchers at the University of Central Florida set out to explore how the material properties during this phenomenon enable the production of these high-speed jets that often go unnoticed or unappreciated, even by avid citrus consumers. They’ll discuss their work at the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Science

Channels:

Acoustics, acoustical waves, Sound, Vibrations, Noise, Auditory, Bubble, eggs, Volcano, New Orleans, JAZZ, Acoustical Society of America, ASA

Save the Date: Acoustical Society of America Fall Meeting in New Orleans, Dec. 4-8

Acoustical waves and vibrations allow us to hear and experience the world with fuller sensory stimulation. Acoustics has applications that cover a broad spectrum of topics including anthropogenic noise in marine environments, the dangers of hospital noise, and auditory sensitivity after drinking. The Acoustical Society of America’s fall meeting this year will showcase the diversity of sound and its applications, held Dec. 4-8, 2017, in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Science

Channels:

Nasal Spray, Sinus, Drug Delivery, fluid pathways, sinus paths, nasal cavities, Fluid Dynamics, Saikat Basu, Zainab Farzal, Julia S. Kimbell, University Of North Carolina, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

'Magic' Sinus Paths Could Mean New Instructions for Nasal Sprays

APS-DFD_Basu_MagicalSinus.jpg

Sinus infections, inflammation and nasal congestion constantly plague Americans, often leading to unpleasant symptoms and even missed days of work. Traditional nasal spray anti-inflammatory medications attempt to treat the symptoms noninvasively, but are not very efficient in transmitting the active drug ingredients directly into the sinus cavities. Researchers from the University of North Carolina will present their research on the anatomy-based flow physics in nasal cavities which generate “magical” streamlines for sinus drug delivery at the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Science

Channels:

Rain, Raindrops, Pathogens, Crops, Dispersal, splash, Grain, Wheat, Plants, Seungho Kim, Hope Gruszewski, Todd Gidley, David G. Schmale III, Sunghwan Jung, Virginia Tech, Division of Fluid Dynamics, Fluid Dynamics, American Physical Society, APS, DFD

Raindrops Splash Pathogens Onto Crops

Pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses or fungi, cause harmful plant disease and often lead to the destruction of agricultural fields. With many possible dispersal methods, it can often be difficult to assess the damage of a pathogen’s impact before it’s too late. At the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, researchers from Virginia Tech will present their work on rain drop dispersal mechanisms of rust fungus on wheat plants.

Science

Channels:

dandelion, Parachute, dandelion seeds, plume dispersal, Drone, Reynolds number, Vortex, Cathal Cummins, Ignazio Maria Viola, Madeleine Seale, Enrico Mastropaolo, Naomi Nakayama, University Of Edinburgh, Fluid Dynamics, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

The Physics Behind Dandelion Seed Plume Dispersal Revealed

The fluffy dandelion seed head infuriates gardeners, but delights physicists. That’s because those seeds may lend key insights into the physics of parachutes, useful for designing small drones, or micro air vehicles. An interdisciplinary collaboration at the University of Edinburgh will present their findings on the topic at the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21. Investigators reveal why, at low Reynolds numbers, the rules for big parachutes don’t apply to small dandelions.

Science

Channels:

Plesiosaurs, Dinosaurs, Jurassic Period, flipper, Swimming, Propulsion, robotic vehicle, Hydrodynamics, Bioinspired, bioinspired design, Gabriel Weymouth, Kate Devereux, Nick Copsey, Luke Muscutt, Jon Downes, Bharath Ganapathisubramani, University of Southampton, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

Plesiosaur Flippers Inspire a Steering Mechanism for Swimming Robotic Vehicle

WeymouthPic.jpg

Plesiosaurs, who thrived during the early to middle Jurassic Period, used four paddlelike flippers of nearly equal size and musculature to swim. Despite the seemingly subpar engineering, the fossil record reveals that plesiosaurs were widespread and prolific. This inspired a team in the U.K. to explore how swimming with four flippers might be advantageous compared to two. They’ll present their work during the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Science

Channels:

star-nosed mole, Chemical Detection, Bioinspired, bioinspired design, chemical sensor, Gas Sensor, odor, Smell, Alexander Lee, Thomas Spencer, David Hu, Georgia Institute Of Technology, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

Underwater Sniffing of Star-Nosed Moles Is Mimicked for Chemical-Detecting ‘Electronic Nose’

Lee1.jpg

The star-nosed mole has several unusual abilities. One of them is “sniffing” underwater by blowing bubbles and quickly re-inhaling them, detecting odors of its prey through the water. The moles’ “star” nose features a ring of tiny, pink tentacles and is the most sensitive known touch organ of any mammal. Researchers will present their work exploring the star-nosed moles’ unusual underwater sniffing ability during the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.

Science

Channels:

BEER, beer foam, stout beer, bubble clustering, Bubble, Cascade, splash, Fluid Dynamics, Fumiya Iwatsubo, Tomoaki Watamura, Kazuyasu Sugiyama, Osaka University, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

Bubbles Clustering While Pouring Stout Beers?

Sugiyama-Beer-Bubbles.jpg

If you’ve poured a stout beer into a pint glass, you may have wondered about the or physics behind the rapid rise of bubbles and three-color shift when dark, medium and light shades are all clearly visible, before it transitions to simply beer and foam. During the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017, researchers from will present their work exploring the fluid dynamics behind this type of bubble clustering in stout and nitrogenized stout beers and carbonated drinks.

Science

Channels:

Jellyfish, stinging cells, nematocyte, nematocysts, jellyfish sting, Tubule, Fluid Dynamics, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

Stinging Cells Pack a Powerful Pressure

The stinging cells of jellyfish, called nematocytes, have evolved to be one of the world’s most efficient predation tools. The nematocysts consist of a capsule and folded tubule, and use high pressure and acceleration for defense and locomotion and, more importantly, to capture prey. Inconsistencies in a previous conceptual explanation of the stinging cell mechanism were identified using a microfluidic system and mathematical models. Researchers will share their mathematical model of nemotocytes at the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017. The model demonstrates how environmental modifications can reduce the impact of jellyfish stinging capacity.

Science

Channels:

oil, cooking oil, kitchen safety, Indoor Air Pollution, hot oil, Air Quality, explosive droplets, Cooking, Jeremy Marston, Chao Li, Tadd Truscott, Mohammad Mansoor, Texas Tech University, Utah State University, Division of Fluid Dynamics, DFD, American Physical Society, APS

'Explosive' Hot Oil Droplets Could Hurt Your Skin -- and Air Quality

Cooking in a frying pan with oil can quickly become dangerous if “explosive” hot oil droplets jump out of the pan, leading to painful burns. But these droplets may be doing something even more damaging: contributing to indoor air pollution. A group of researchers exploring these “explosive droplets” will present their work to uncover the fluid dynamics behind this phenomenon during the 70th meeting of the Division of Fluid Dynamics, Nov. 19-21, 2017.







Chat now!