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Science

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A Novel Way to Power Greener Homes, A New Path in Battle Against Mosquito-Borne Illness, A Better Hydrogen Fuel Option for Vehicles, and More in the DOE Science News Source

Click here to go directly to the DOE Science News Source

Medicine

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Influenza, flu, Flumist, Sick, throw up, cold, Vaccine, Fever, trivalent, Loyola, Injection, CDC, chills, coug, Cough, infectious diosease, Infection, Infectious Disease, FDA, Strains, Virus, Germs, hand, Sneeze, Hygiene

You'll Feel the Pinch This Year: Get the Flu Shot

This year, everyone will have to roll up their sleeves and receive the flu shot via injection, as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) no longer recommends the nasal flu mist vaccine due to ineffectiveness. "Feeling the pinch is a small price to pay to protect your health and, importantly, to protect the health of those more vulnerable to illness," said Jorge Parada, MD, MPH, medical director, infection prevention and control program, Loyola Medicine.

Medicine

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Hirschsprung disease, Hirschsprung’s disease, regulatory networks, RET, genetic networks, Colon, Rare Diseases, Complex Diseases

Noncoding Mutations Disrupt Cooperative Function of ‘Gene Families’ in Rare Genetic Disorder

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Scientists say they are one step closer to understanding the genetic mechanism of a rare, complex, multiple-gene disorder called Hirschsprung’s disease. Their results suggest that many patients develop the disease when multiple mutations in gene regulatory sequences of a specific gene combine to destroy the normal cooperative function of a whole network of genes.

Medicine

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Autoimmune, Autoimmune Advocacy, National Coalition of Autoimmune Patient Groups (NCAPG), behcets, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Celiac, Graves Disease, Hashimoto's, Pemphigus Vulgaris, Lupus, Myasthenia Gravis, multiple sclerosis, Psoriasis, Scleroderma, Myositis, Sjogren's Syndrome, Vasculitis, Relapsing Polychondritis

AARDA Salutes September #Autoimmune Hero for Providing a Strong, Collaborative Voice for the 50 Million Americans with Autoimmune Disease

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American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) announced today its newest Autoimmune Heroes – the 39 autoimmune disease specific patient groups who comprise the National Coalition of Autoimmune Patient Groups (NCAPG).

Medicine

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flu, Influenza, Flu Mist, CDC, Flu Season, flu bug, Infectious Disease, Infection Control, Flumist, Flu Vaccine

Loyola Infectious Disease Experts Available To Talk About Flu And Why Nasal Flu Mist is not Recommended This Year

Medicine

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Flu Vaccination, Pediatrics, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Immunization, Influenza Vaccination, American Journal of Infection Control

Parents Cite Lack of Need as Reason for Not Getting Kids Flu Shots

Despite the fact that influenza leads to more hospitalizations and deaths among children than any other vaccine-preventable disease, parents frequently decline vaccinating their children against influenza because they don’t perceive the need, according to a new case-control study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Infection Control, the official publication of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).

Medicine

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Ted Dawson, Dawson, Valina Dawson, Han Seok Ko, Xiaobo Mao, Parkinson's Disease, Parkinson's, LAG3, Alpha-synuclein, α-synuclein , Brain, Cells

New Treatment Strategy Could Cut Parkinson’s Disease Off at the Pass

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Researchers at Johns Hopkins report they have identified a protein that enables a toxic natural aggregate to spread from cell to cell in a mammal’s brain — and a way to block that protein’s action. Their study in mice and cultured cells suggests that an immunotherapy already in clinical trials as a cancer therapy should also be tested as a way to slow the progress of Parkinson’s disease, the researchers say.

Medicine

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Sepsis, sepsis early warning and response tool , sepsis prevention

Pennsylvania Leaders and Pinnacle Health Call on Citizens to Join New Campaign To "Knock Out Sepsis" and Save Lives

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Knock Out Sepsis" campaign launched from the Harrisburg State Capitol Rotunda for Sepsis Awareness Month.

Medicine

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flu, Flu Season, Flu Vaccination, Flu Vaccine, Influenza

The Medical Minute: What You Need to Know This Flu Season

As flu season approaches, medical experts have some new recommendations – along with some old standards – on how to reduce your chances of getting sick.

Medicine

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HPV, Human Papilloma Virus, Human Papilloma Virus (Hpv), human papilloma virus vaccine, Incidence Rates

New Research Shows HPV Vaccine Reduces Cervical Pre-Cancers In Young Women

New research published Sept 29, 2016, in JAMA Oncology shows the HPV vaccine is efficacious in reducing cervical pre-cancers among young women throughout a population. The New Mexico HPV Pap Registry was the data source used in the study. The researchers found that among women who were 15 to 19 years old at the time of a diagnostic cervical biopsy, the incidence rate of cervical abnormalities decreased between 2007 and 2014.

Science

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Kansas State University, K-State, KSU, Kansas State, Higgs, stephen higgs, Vanlandingham, Dana Vanlandingham, zika, Mosquito, zika virus, Outbreak, Biosecurity Research Institute, BRI, Vaccine, Zika vaccine, Dna Vaccine

Kansas State University Contributes to Potential Zika Virus Vaccine Development

A research team that includes scientists with Kansas State University's Biosecurity Research Institute has developed a promising Zika virus vaccine.

Medicine

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Sandra Rotman Centre for Global Health, University Of Toronto, University Health Network, Science Translational Medicine , Toronto General Research Institute , TGRI, UHN, UFT and UHN, UHN collaborative work, UHN research, Malaria, antimalarial drugs, Antimalarial, Global Health, Cerebral Malaria, children illness, children disease, children with malaria, ne

Treating Malaria by Stabilizing Leaky Blood Vessels

Boosting a protective protein to stabilize blood vessels that are weakened by malaria showed improved survival, beyond that of antimalarial drugs alone in pre-clinical research. Toronto General Research Institute (TGRI) and the Sandra Rotman Centre for Global Health, University of Toronto and University Health Network (UHN) researchers describe in Science Translational Medicine how their approach bolsters the body’s own capabilities to protect itself against cerebral malaria, rather than solely targeting the malaria parasites in the blood.

Medicine

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St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Infectious Disease, inflammasome, Immunology, IRGB10 , danger-sensing proteins, Cytoplasm, Interferon

Scientists Reveal How Signals From Pathogenic Bacteria Reach Danger Sensors of Cells

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital scientists show that IRGB10, an essential protein induced by the signaling protein interferon, is needed to activate danger-sensing proteins in the cytoplasm of cells.

Medicine

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zika, Infectious Disease

Case Study Reports Details of Mysterious Utah Zika-Related Death

Researchers at the University of Utah School of Medicine and ARUP Laboratories in Salt Lake City unravel the mystery behind a rare Zika-related death in an adult, and unconventional transmission to a second patient in a correspondence published online on September 28 in the New England Journal of Medicine. Details point to an unusually high concentration of virus in the first patient’s blood as being responsible for his death. The phenomenon may also explain how the second patient may have contracted the virus by casual contact with the primary patient, the first such documented case.

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Exercise Not Shown to Reduce Women’s Risk of Developing MS

MINNEAPOLIS – A large, new study shows no evidence that exercise may reduce a woman’s risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS). The research is published in the September 28, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Previous small studies had shown conflicting results.

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EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Oct-2016 3:00 PM EDT

Medicine

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Wayne State University, HIV and youth, HIV, Youth, National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child and Human Development

Wayne State Awarded $15.7 Million NIH Grant to Address HIV Prevention Among Youth

A team of researchers led by Wayne State University has been awarded funding as a part of the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, a research network devoted to the health and well-being of adolescents and young adults with HIV or at risk for HIV infection. The Wayne State team, led by Sylvie Naar, Ph.D., professor and division director of behavioral sciences in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences at the Wayne State School of Medicine and associate director of the Pediatric Prevention Research Center, has been awarded an anticipated total of $15.7 million dollars over five years from the National Institute of Child and Human Development of the National Institutes of Health, for the project, Scale it Up.

Medicine

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mosquito-borne viruses, , zika, dengue, chikungunya

Sociol-Ecological System Approach Leads to New Information in Study of Mosquito-Borne Viruses

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In an article published online Sept. 13 in UGEC Viewpoints , Upstate Medical University researcher Anna Stewart Ibarra, PhD, MPA, describes how a collaborative approach by researchers of varying disciplines is being used as a framework for studying the mosquito-borne viruses, zika, dengue and chikungunya.

Medicine

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zika, Public Health

Zika and Water Safety Education a Mission for Rutgers Graduate

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Amber Gourdine puts her public health education into service in central Nicaragua

Medicine

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Food Insecurity, child hunger, Child Welfare, Hunger, poverty and health, Poverty, Immigrant, Immigration enforcement, Immigration enforcement program, Immigration Expert, Immigration and Health , Health Outcomes, health outcomes research, Immigration Policy, Deportation

Deportation Risk Increases Food Insecurity

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Researchers from the University of Missouri have found that local immigration enforcement policies that seek to apprehend and deport adults, can increase food insecurity risks for Mexican non-citizen households with children. Stephanie Potochnick, assistant professor in the Truman School of Public Affairs, says that any immigration policy that seeks to deport adults must have support systems, such as access to food stamps, in place to help improve outcomes for the children left behind.







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