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A Vaccine for Ebola?

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To learn more about this outbreak and the creation of new human vaccines, Vermont Medicine, a publication of the University of Vermont College of Medicine, talked to infectious disease experts Beth Kirkpatrick, M.D., UVM Vaccine Testing Center director, and Kristen Pierce, M.D., who have led vaccine studies for such global pathogens as cholera, West Nile virus, dengue, typhoid fever and anthrax.

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Home Is Where the Microbes Are

A study published today in Science reports provides a detailed analysis of the microbes that live in houses and apartments.

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Mice Study Shows Efficacy of New Gene Therapy Approach for Toxin Exposures

New research led by Charles Shoemaker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, shows that gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention and treatment of botulism exposure over current methods. The findings of the National Institutes of Health funded study appear in the August 29 issue of PLOS ONE.

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AJRCCM Releases ‘Caring for Critically Ill Patients with Ebola Virus Disease: Perspectives from West Africa’

The largest-ever Ebola virus disease outbreak is ravaging West Africa, but with more personnel, basic monitoring, and supportive treatment, many of the sickest patients with Ebola virus disease do not need to die, note the authors of a new paper published ahead of print publication in the American Thoracic Society’s American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Center for Vaccine Development Leading the Way in Testing of Potential Ebola Vaccine as Part of Unprecedented International Consortium

The Center for Vaccine Development at the University of Maryland School of Medicine is leading an internationally-acclaimed consortium of scientists in an unprecedented multi-trial collaboration to test a potential vaccine that could help prevent the continuing spread of the deadly Ebola virus.

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HIV Lessons From the Mississippi Baby

The news in July that HIV had returned in a Mississippi toddler after a two-year treatment-free remission dashed the hopes of clinicians, HIV researchers and the public at large tantalized by the possibility of a cure. But a new commentary by two leading HIV experts at Johns Hopkins argues that despite its disappointing outcome, the Mississippi case and two other recent HIV “rebounds” in adults, have yielded critical lessons about the virus’ most perplexing — and maddening — feature: its ability to form cure-defying viral hideouts.

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Zombie Bacteria Are Nothing to Be Afraid Of

Scientists at Washington University in St. Louis have obtained the first experimental evidence that there are at least two fail-safe points in the bacterial cell cycle. If the fail-safes are activated, the cell is forced to exit the cell cycle forever. It then enters a zombie-like state and is unable to reproduce even under the most favorable of conditions. Drugs that trigger the fail-safes are already under development.

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Drug Shows Promise Against Sudan Strain of Ebola in Mice

Researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and other institutions have developed a potential antibody therapy for Sudan ebolavirus (SUDV), one of the two most lethal strains of Ebola. A different strain, the Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV), is now devastating West Africa. First identified in 1976, SUDV has caused numerous Ebola outbreaks (most recently in 2012) that have killed more than 400 people in total. The findings were reported in ACS Chemical Biology.

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New Analysis of Old HIV Vaccines Finds Potentially Protective Immune Response

Applying the benefit of hindsight, researchers at Duke Medicine have reanalyzed the findings of two historic pediatric HIV vaccine trials with encouraging results. The vaccines had in fact triggered an antibody response -- now known to be associated with protection in adults -- that was previously unrecognized in the infants studied in the 1990s.

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A New Report Examines First Reported Spread of Vaccinia Virus Through Shaving After Contact Transmission

A 30-year-old unvaccinated male security forces student is the first reported case of spreading the smallpox vaccine virus (vaccinia) across his face by shaving after he had inadvertently acquired the virus during combative training at the largest U.S. Air Force training installation, according to a recently released health surveillance report.

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