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Simulating the Potential Spread of Measles

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To help the public better understand how measles can spread, an NIH-funded team of infectious disease computer modelers at the University of Pittsburgh has launched a free, mobile-friendly tool that lets users simulate measles outbreaks in cities across the country.

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Gorilla Origins of the Last Two AIDS Virus Lineages Confirmed

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Two of the four known groups of human AIDS viruses (HIV-1 groups O and P) have originated in western lowland gorillas, according to an international team of scientists.

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Johns Hopkins Researchers Identify Key to Tuberculosis Resistance

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The cascade of events leading to bacterial infection and the immune response is mostly understood. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune response to the bacteria that causes tuberculosis have remained a mystery — until now. Researchers at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have now uncovered how a bacterial molecule controls the body’s response to TB infection and suggest that adjusting the level of this of this molecule may be a new way to treat the disease. The report appears this week as an advance online publication of Nature Medicine.

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Curb Overuse of Antibiotics to Reduce Drug-Resistant Superbug

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An aggressive campaign to reduce the unnecessary use of antibiotics has helped cut the rate of infection with a dangerous drug-resistant bacteria at The Valley Hospital in Ridgewood, NJ, by nearly 40 percent.

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Malaria Transmission Linked to Mosquitoes’ Sexual Biology

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Sexual biology may be the key to uncovering why Anopheles mosquitoes are unique in their ability to transmit malaria to humans, according to researchers at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and University of Perugia, Italy.

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Research Shows Asian Herb Holds Promise as Treatment for Ebola Virus Disease

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New research that focuses on the mechanism by which Ebola virus infects a cell and the discovery of a promising drug therapy candidate is being published February 27, 2015, in the journal Science.

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Human Antibodies Target Marburg, Ebola Viruses; One Step Closer to Vaccine

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Researchers at Vanderbilt University, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and The Scripps Research Institute for the first time have shown how human antibodies can neutralize the Marburg virus, a close cousin to Ebola.

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TSRI Team Shows How Rare Antibody Targets Ebola and Marburg Virus

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The Scripps Research Institute scientists have captured the first images showing how immune molecules bind to a site on the surface of Marburg virus and have described an antibody that binds to both Marburg and Ebola viruses, pointing to new antibody treatments to fight an entire family of viruses.

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Largest Study of Its Kind Documents Causes of Childhood Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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To investigate specific causes of childhood CAP, University of Utah Health Sciences and other institutions collaborated with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on the largest study of its kind, the Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC). Among children under age 18, 73 percent of those with pneumonia had viral infections and 15 percent had bacterial infections. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was the most commonly detected pathogen. The results were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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Multicenter Study Finds Respiratory Viruses Most Common Cause of Pneumonia in Children

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Respiratory viruses, not bacterial infections, are the most commonly detected causes of community-acquired pneumonia in children, according to new research released Feb. 26 in the New England Journal of Medicine.