Feature Channels:

Social Media

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Medicine

Channels:

Inflammatory Bowel Disease, IBD, Social Media, Social Media and IBD, Social Media and Medication

Researchers Use Social Media to Identify Biggest Concerns Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Have with Treatments

Cedars-Sinai researchers analyzed thousands of social media posts to determine the biggest concerns patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have about their prescribed treatments. The No. 1 patient concern: Risks of side effects from biologic medications even when risks are remote.

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Facebook, Fake news, UK elections, Social Network

Despite Efforts, Facebook Is Not Ready to Take on Fake News

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Nitin Agarwal, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Social Media, social media analysis, social media behavior, Botnets, trolls, Propaganda, online campaigns, Fake news, NATO, propaganda dissemination, Deviant Behavior

Arkansas Professor Addresses NATO Meeting on Dangers of Information Disseminated by Botnets

Nitin-Agarwal.jpg

A University of Arkansas at Little Rock professor advised members of NATO about the danger of false information distributed online through botnets, a network of computer programs that act autonomously on social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook.

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Trump, Tweets, Social Media, Fake news, Mass Media, Twitter

Trump Tweets Phrases "Fake News" And "Failing NYTimes" the Most - Temple University Expert

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Trump, first 100 DAYS, Twitter, Tweets, Fake news, Failing Nytimes, New York Times

Trump Tweets the Phrases "Fake News" and "Failing NYTimes" the Most

“Fake news” and “failing nytimes” are the two phrases Donald Trump tweeted most in his first 100 days in office, showing just how much the president used Twitter to target the media at the start of his administration, according to Temple University researchers.

Life

Law and Public Policy

Channels:

Google, Internet, Internet search, Public Opinion, Fake news, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Poland, Italy, Spain, Media, Mass Media, algorithim, search engines

Fake News and Filters Aren’t Fooling Internet Users

Despite what some politicians argue, fake news and biased search algorithms aren’t swaying public opinion, finds a Michigan State University researcher.

Science

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

Brain, Facebook, social media, Social Networks, Social Exclusion, fMRI

The Link Between Brain Activity and Social Networks

The structure of the social network to which a person belongs could shape how their brain responds to social exclusion, according to a new study led by a Michigan State University researcher.

Science

Business

Channels:

signal inteference, electronic jamming, spectrum resilience, responder tech, GPS, Communications, communications jamming, DHS, S&T, R&D, Facebook

Let's Talk About Stopping Jamming!

We will answer questions about DHS S&T’s work on spectrum resiliency and its impact on first responders, their mission space and their standard operating procedures. Hope to see you there!

Life

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Channels:

autocracy, Elections, Politics, Russia, Russian Government, Vladimir Putin, Social Media, Blogs, Fraud, Kremlin, Democracy, Facebook, Twitter, Blogosphere

Is the Blog to Blame for Vladimir Putin’s 2011-12 Elections Defeat?

Russia.jpg

In the 2011-12 elections, Russia’s government leaders underestimated the power of the internet and it impacted the outcome of the elections and spurred massive demonstrations in response to Vladimir Putin’s stage-managing the presidential succession and evidence of widespread fraud. While the effects of internet use on political participation are well understood, the mechanisms of how this happens is unclear. A new study uncovers how social media can drive support for opposition in an autocratic state.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Twitter, research communication, science communication, Journals, Surgery, Social Media

As Scientists Take to Twitter, New Study Shows Power of “Visual Abstract” Graphics to Share Results

VisualAbstractCapture.JPG

When it comes to sharing new research findings with the world, Twitter has emerged as a key tool for scientists. A new study shows a way for research findings to reach even more people, by boiling them down into a Twitter-friendly graphic called a “visual abstract”. The result: Nearly three times as many clicks to read the full paper.







Chat now!