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Social and Behavioral Sciences

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HIV Acquisition, Hetrosexual, Center for Drug Use and HIV Research, CDUHR, NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing

NYU Researchers Examine Most Efficacious Social/Behavioral Interventions to Uncover Undiagnosed HIV

At least a third of new HIV transmission events are linked to those with undiagnosed HIV. Researchers looked to identify best approaches to uncovering undiagnosed HIV, comparing the efficacy of three social/behavioral intervention strategies for heterosexual individuals at high risk for HIV in Brooklyn, NY. Active approaches to detect undiagnosed HIV among heterosexuals are needed to achieve elimination of HIV transmission in the U.S.; the study addresses this gap in available HIV prevention programs.

Medicine

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psorias, Thrombosis, Blood Clot, IL-6

Immune System’s “Workaround” May Explain Heart Disease in Psoriasis Patients

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Two new studies out of Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine describe how the inflammatory response to psoriasis can alter levels of several immune system molecules, ultimately increasing a person’s risk of thrombosis, which can include fatal blood clots

Medicine

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Cancer, Breast Cancer, Breast Reconstruction, autologous breast reconstruction, Treatment Satisfaction, Radiation Therapy

More Complications, Less Satisfaction in Breast Cancer Patients Who Have Radiation and Implants

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A new study finds that breast cancer patients who have implant reconstruction following radiation therapy had more complications from the surgery and were less satisfied with the result than women who had implants but no radiation.

Medicine

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Optometry, Optometry & Vision Science, Optometry and Vision Science, ophtahlmology

$2 Million Grant Awarded to UAB to Continue Eye Care Research

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Funding from a National Eye Institute award to the UAB School of Optometry will advance eye care research.

Medicine

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Diabetes Research, center for diabetes translation research, diabetes translation research center, diabetes translation research, pre-diabetes research, epidemiology & population health, Social Medicine

NIH Funds Center for Diabetes Translation Research Led by Albert Einstein College of Medicine

The National Institutes of Health has awarded researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Health System a five-year, $2.9-million grant to launch a new center, one of only 8 in the country, for diabetes translation research. The center—the New York Regional Center for Diabetes Translation Research (NY Regional CDTR)—also includes faculty from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai and the New York Academy of Medicine.

Medicine

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Northwestern University, Northwestern Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Brain

Rhythm of Breathing Affects Memory and Fear

Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered for the first time that the rhythm of breathing creates electrical activity in the human brain that enhances emotional judgments and memory recall. These effects on behavior depend critically on whether you inhale or exhale and whether you breathe through the nose or mouth.

Science

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TET Proteins Drive Early Neurogenesis

The fate of stem cells is determined by series of choices that sequentially narrow their available options until stem cells’ offspring have found their station and purpose in the body. Their decisions are guided in part by TET proteins rewriting the epigenome, the regulatory layer of chemical flags that adorn the genome and influence gene activity, report researchers at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology and UC San Diego.

Medicine

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How to Turn White Fat Brown

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Researchers found that the browning program in white fat cells is normally suppressed by a protein called FLCN. It performs this function in cooperation with a major cellular signaling hub, a protein complex known as mTOR. Harnessing this knowledge may one day provide the key to better treatments for obesity.

Medicine

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Neal Fedarko, Peter M. Abadir, Peter Abadir, Autoantibody, Blood, Angiotensin

New Link Discovered Between Class of Rogue Autoantibodies and Poor Health Outcomes

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Results of a new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers offer new evidence for a strong link between angiotensin receptor autoantibodies and increased risk of frailty. In a report on the work, published online in the journal Circulation on Nov. 30, the team says a large class of common blood pressure drugs that target the angiotensin receptor, called angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), may help patients depending on the levels of the autoantibodies.

Medicine

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Glioblastoma, NAD+ pathway, Nampt, NMN, Aging and Cancer, Brain Cancer

Pathway Linked to Slower Aging Also Fuels Brain Cancer

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A metabolic pathway linked to slower aging is overactive in a deadly form of brain cancer, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Their findings suggest that tweaking the pathway to treat cancer may affect other biological processes, such as aging.

Science

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Learning, infant learning, Language acquisition, Babies, Parenting, Visual Attention, First Words, Psychology, psychological and brain sciences, early language learning, Speech Disorders, Autism

Babies' First Words Can Be Predicted Based on Visual Attention, IU Study Finds

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Indiana University psychologists have shown that a baby's most likely first words are based upon their visual experience, laying the foundation for a new theory of infant language learning. The study appears in the journal of the Royal Society Philosophical Transactions B.

Science

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quantum spin liquid, Ytterbium, YbMgGaO4, Martin Mourigal, ORNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Neutron Scattering, Crystal, quantum materials, condensed matter physics, spooky action at a distance, quantum entanglement

‘Spooky’ Sightings in Crystal Point to Extremely Rare Quantum Spin Liquid

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Little is rarer than an observable quantum spin liquid, but now, tests reveal that a synthetic crystal with ytterbium as its base may house one at near absolute zero. It joins an extremely short list of materials believed house myriads of particles joined together in an observable vast, shared entanglement, or "spooky action at a distance."

Medicine

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Janice Clements, Lucio Gama, HIV, AIDS, simian immunodeficiency virus, SIV, shoot and kill, Brain, Virus, macaques

'Shock and Kill' Strategy for Curing HIV May Endanger Patients' Brains

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Combination drug treatments have become successful at long-term control of HIV infection, but the goal of totally wiping out the virus and curing patients has so far been stymied by HIV's ability to hide out in cells and become dormant for long periods of time.

Science

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Cannibis, baby boom generation, Health Risk, Marijuana

"Baby Boomers” on Dope: Recreational Marijuana Use Is on the Rise Among Adults Over 50

There is a common misperception that widespread marijuana use is limited to younger generations. However, the Baby Boomer generation has reported higher rates of substance use than any preceding generation.

Science

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Physics, Materials Science, Quantum Mechanics, Classical Physics, Quantum Physics, topological insulator

Exotic Insulator May Hold Clue to Key Mystery of Modern Physics

Experiments using laser light and pieces of gray material the size of fingernail clippings may offer clues to a fundamental scientific riddle: What is the relationship between the everyday world of classical physics and the hidden quantum realm that obeys entirely different rules?

Medicine

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JAK inhibitors, Cancer, Tumor, Interferon, cell

Disabling Critical "Node" Revs Up Attack When Cancer Immunotherapies Fall Short

PHILADELPHIA—An existing drug known as a JAK inhibitor may help patients who don’t respond to the so-called checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy drugs overcome that resistance, suggests a new preclinical study published online in Cell today by Penn Medicine researchers.  Importantly, the results demonstrate that shutting down the interferon pathway, shown here to be critical to a tumor’s resistance to immunotherapy, with a JAK inhibitor may improve checkpoint inhibitor drugs and even bypass the need for combinations of these drugs, which often come with serious side effects.

Medicine

Science

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Opioid, Addiction, pain, Oxycodone, Brain, Therapy

Scripps Florida Scientists Identify Novel Compound to Alleviate Pain and Itch

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In a new study, scientists from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have identified a possible drug candidate that suppresses pain and itch in animal models.

Medicine

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Alzheimer's Disease, Dementia, Einstein Aging Study, Aging Brain, Aging, Neurology, Healthy Aging, smartphones and dementia

Einstein and Penn State Researchers Awarded $12.2 Million to Study Alzheimer's Disease

December 1, 2016 — (BRONX, NY) —The National Institutes of Health has awarded researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Pennsylvania State University a five-year, $12.2 million grant to continue studies on the aging brain, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. More than five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease—a number that is expected to double by 2040 as baby boomers age.

Medicine

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Roland Griffiths, Cancer, Drugs, Anxiety, Psilocybin

Hallucinogenic Drug Psilocybin Eases Existential Anxiety in People with Life-Threatening Cancer

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In a small double-blind study, Johns Hopkins researchers report that a substantial majority of people suffering cancer-related anxiety or depression found considerable relief for up to six months from a single large dose of psilocybin -- the active compound in hallucinogenic "magic mushrooms."

Medicine

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Bidmc, Beth Israel Deaconess, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Parkinson Disease, Cognitive Deficits, Orthostatic Hypotension

Standing Up May Unmask Cognitive Deficits in Patients with Parkinson’s

This study shows that when patients with PD experience a drop in blood pressure upon standing up – a condition known as orthostatic hypotension (OH) – they exhibit significant cognitive deficits. These deficits reverse when the individual lies down and their blood pressure returns to normal. As a result, these findings are important as clinical providers might miss an important target for intervention when not considering OH as a contributor to cognitive impairment.







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