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Article ID: 693240

Wayne State Professor Earns NSF CAREER Award to Improve Wireless Wearable Biosensors

Wayne State University Division of Research

ai-Yen Chen, Ph.D., assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering at Wayne State University’s College of Engineering, recently received a National Science Foundation (NSF) Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award, the organization’s most prestigious accolade for up-and-coming researchers in science and engineering. Chen is the recipient of a five-year, $500,000 grant for his project, “Integrated Research and Education on Self-Activated, Transparent Harmonics-Based Wireless Sensing Systems Using Graphene Bioelectronics.”

Released:
20-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Embargo will expire:
24-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
20-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 24-Apr-2018 12:00 PM EDT

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Article ID: 693219

Wood Formation Model To Fuel Progress in Bioenergy, Paper, New Applications

North Carolina State University

Need stronger timber, better biofuel or new sources of green chemicals? A systems biology model built on decades of NC State research will accelerate progress on engineering trees for specific needs.

Released:
20-Apr-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    20-Apr-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 692970

When There’s an Audience, People’s Performance Improves

Johns Hopkins University

Often people think performing in front of others will make them mess up, but a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist found the opposite: being watched can make people do better.

Released:
17-Apr-2018 12:30 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693189

Vitamin D Deficiency Linked to Greater Risk of Diabetes

University of California San Diego Health

An epidemiological study conducted by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Seoul National University suggests that persons deficient in vitamin D may be at much greater risk of developing diabetes. The findings are reported April 19 in PLOS One.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 4:15 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693197

Wayne State Political Science Professor Receives NSF Funding to Explore Constraints on Policy Learning After Disasters

Wayne State University Division of Research

With the help of a $55,000 grant from the National Science Foundation, Kristin O’Donovan, Ph.D., assistant professor of political science in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Wayne State University, will explore the limits on policy learning about disaster mitigation after a community has experienced a disaster. O’Donovan will also seek to understand why one community may be more vulnerable to a disaster than its neighbor.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

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Article ID: 693193

This Remote-Control Shoots Laser at Gold to Switch on Cancer-Killing Immune Cells

Georgia Institute of Technology

Cancer immune cell therapy has made headlines with astounding successes like saving former U.S. President Jimmy Carter from brain cancer. But immunotherapy has also had many tragic flops. Georgia Tech researchers working to optimize the innovative treatment have implanted a genetic switch that activates T-cells when they are inside of tumors. Remote-control light waves resembling those used in a TV remote combine with gold nanorods to flip the switch.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 4:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693187

Putting Proteins in Their Proper Place

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania

A host of nuclear RNA-binding proteins, when misplaced outside the nucleus, form the harmful clumps seen in several brain disorders, including FTD and ALS. Clumps that form from these disease proteins are composed of sticky fibrils that damage nerve cells.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 4:00 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693192

BIDMC-Lead Team Develops New Approach to Study Non-Coding RNAs

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center

In a groundbreaking paper published today in the journal Cell, investigators at the Cancer Research Institute Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have found dozens of important new genes, both coding and non-coding that impact sensitivity to chemotherapy. In doing so, the scientists developed a novel technique that marries CRISPR technology with big data mining to identify and assign function to non-coding RNAs

Released:
19-Apr-2018 3:55 PM EDT
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Article ID: 693186

Variants in Non-Coding DNA Contribute to Inherited Autism Risk

University of California San Diego Health

In recent years, researchers have firmly established that gene mutations appearing for the first time, called de novo mutations, contribute to approximately one-third of cases of autism spectrum disorder. In a new study, a team led by scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have identified a culprit that may explain some of the remaining risk: rare inherited variants in regions of non-coding DNA. The findings are published April 20 in Science.

Released:
19-Apr-2018 3:30 PM EDT
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