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  • Embargo expired:
    18-Jun-2018 5:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 696197

Scientists find potential disease-fighting 'warheads' hidden in bacteria

Scripps Research Institute

A new study by Scripps Research, published today in Nature Communications, suggests scientists could build better drugs by learning from bacteria-derived molecules called thiocarboxylic acids.

Released:
15-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 695952

A diabetes diagnosis later in life may signal early pancreatic cancer in African-Americans and Latinos

Keck Medicine of USC

A new study from the Keck School of Medicine of USC shows that African-Americans and Latinos who are diagnosed with diabetes after age 50 have a more than threefold risk of developing pancreatic cancer.

Released:
17-Jun-2018 8:00 PM EDT
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19-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT
Released to reporters:
15-Jun-2018 1:00 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 19-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

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  • Embargo expired:
    15-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695995

Quality of diet still poor for SNAP participants

Tufts University

A new Food-PRICE study finds persistent nutritional disparities within the food choices of those receiving assistance under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) compared to those not receiving SNAP assistance.

Released:
12-Jun-2018 12:00 PM EDT
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Law and Public Policy

Article ID: 696148

A sprinkle of platinum nanoparticles onto graphene makes brain probes more sensitive

University of California San Diego

Graphene electrodes could enable higher quality brain imaging thanks to new research by a team of engineers and neuroscientists at UC San Diego. The researchers developed a technique, using platinum nanoparticles, to lower the impedance of graphene electrodes by 100 times while keeping them transparent. In tests on transgenic mice, the electrodes were able to record and image neuronal activity (calcium ion spikes) at of large groups of neurons and individual brain cells.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 2:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696109

3D Imaging and Computer Modeling Capture Breast Duct Development

Johns Hopkins Medicine

Working with hundreds of time-lapse videos of mouse tissue, a team of biologists joined up with civil engineers to create what is believed to be the first 3D computer model to show precisely how the tiny tubes that funnel milk through the breasts of mammals form.

Released:
14-Jun-2018 11:20 AM EDT
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  • Embargo expired:
    14-Jun-2018 11:00 AM EDT

Article ID: 695774

Researchers pinpoint new subtype of prostate cancer

Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

Researchers led by the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center have identified a new subtype of prostate cancer that occurs in about 7 percent of patients with advanced disease. This subset of tumors were responsive to immunotherapy treatment.

Released:
7-Jun-2018 12:05 PM EDT
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18-Jun-2018 3:00 PM EDT
Released to reporters:
13-Jun-2018 3:05 PM EDT

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 18-Jun-2018 3:00 PM EDT

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Article ID: 696080

Metabolic imaging targets early signs of disease development

National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

Obesity, cardiovascular disease, and cancer often begin with early, subtle changes in cell metabolism. Now researchers at Tufts University have developed a non-invasive optical imaging technique that detects these changes, providing an early window of opportunity for new research and potential therapeutic development.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 1:05 PM EDT
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Article ID: 696059

Students Study Nanotech, Viruses Across Oceans and Disciplines in Singapore

Michigan Technological University

The world needs more students trained in global, interdisciplinary health science research. The International Research Experience for Students (IRES) program provides an eight-week-long opportunity for students to get lab experience abroad. One group is in Singapore this summer studying nanotechnology and virus detection.

Released:
13-Jun-2018 10:05 AM EDT
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