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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 3-Sep-2014 5:00 PM EDT

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NYC Teens/Young Adults who Abuse Prescription at High Risk for Overdose

A study in the International Journal of Drug Policy explores for the first time overdose-related knowledge and experiences of young adult nonmedical PO users to better understand how PO use relates to the likelihood and experience of overdose.

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War Between Bacteria and Phages Benefits Humans

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In our battle with cholera bacteria, we may have an unknown ally in bacteria-killing viruses known as phages. Researchers from Tufts University and elsewhere report that phages can force cholera bacteria, even during active infection in humans, to give up their virulence in order to survive.

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A Nucleotide Change Could Initiate Fragile X Syndrome

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Researchers reveal how the alteration of a single nucleotide—the basic building block of DNA—could initiate fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited form of intellectual disability.

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Mice Study Shows Efficacy of New Gene Therapy Approach for Toxin Exposures

New research led by Charles Shoemaker, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, shows that gene therapy may offer significant advantages in prevention and treatment of botulism exposure over current methods. The findings of the National Institutes of Health funded study appear in the August 29 issue of PLOS ONE.

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A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 4-Sep-2014 12:00 PM EDT