:

Grant Funded News

Add to Favorites | Subscribe | Share

Filters:

  • (Press "esc" to clear)

Science

Channels:

Neautrophils, Tissues, Integrins, Inflammation, Nature Communications, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, Adhesion receptors

LJI Researchers Gain New Understanding of How Neutrophils Latch Onto Vessel Walls to Protect From Infection and Clean Up Injured Tissue

mAb24Kim127CellMask-3_AiryscanProcessing_c123.jpg

As an arm of the innate immune system, white blood cells called neutrophils form the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Neutrophils spend most of their lives racing through the bloodstream, patrolling for bacteria or other foreign particles. Once they arrive at tissues besieged by infectious agents, they halt on a dime and then blast through the vessel wall to reach the inflammatory attack site.

Medicine

Channels:

Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia, NIMH, industry partnership, Academic Partnership, iPSC, induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, Drug Discovery

Johns Hopkins and Salk Co-Lead $15 Million Initiative to Unravel Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia

cover2.jpg

The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies will co-lead a $15.4 million effort to develop new systems for quickly screening libraries of drugs for potential effectiveness against schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the National Institute of Mental Health has announced.

Medicine

Channels:

Inflammation, Sepsis, Umbilical Cord Blood, net, Immune Response

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 6-Sep-2016 4:00 PM EDT

Medicine

Channels:

Toxoplasma, Toxoplasma Gondii, Toxoplasmosis, Malaria Parasite, Plasmodium Falciparum, Whitehead Institute, genome-wide analysis, apicomplexans

EMBARGOED

A reporter's PressPass is required to access this story until the embargo expires on 1-Sep-2016 12:00 PM EDT

Science

Channels:

University Of Oklahoma, Gallogly College of Engineering, Climate Change, Jizhong Zhou, environmental temperature , Environment

OU Study on Diversity of Microbial Groups Demonstrates the Effects Of Human-Caused Changes in Climate, Land Use and Other Factors

Research shows the diversity of soil bacteria, fungi and nitrogen-fixing bacteria all are better predicted by variation in environmental temperature rather than pH.

Medicine

Science

Channels:

Alcohol, Alcoholism, Addiction, fMRI, Pet And Mri Scans, Dopamine, Brain Scans

Addiction Cravings May Get Their Start Deep in the Right Side of the Brain

Oberlin-Karakenventralstriatumgraphic2.jpg

If you really want a drink right now, the source of your craving may be a pea-sized structure deep inside the right side of your brain, according to scientists at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

Medicine

Channels:

Diabetes, Protein, Insulin, Type 1 And 2 Diabetes, Cell Signaling

Case Western Reserve University Researchers Identify Protein that Delays Type 1 Diabetes Onset in New Mouse Model

A new study reveals a counterintuitive cellular strategy that may protect insulin-producing cells from destruction during type 1 diabetes.

Medicine

Channels:

tissue-engineered liver, Progenitor Cells

Functional Human Tissue-Engineered Liver Generated From Stem and Progenitor Cells

humanTeli-1.jpg

A research team at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles has generated functional human and mouse tissue-engineered liver from adult stem and progenitor cells. Tissue-engineered Liver (TELi) was found to contain normal structural components such as hepatocytes, bile ducts and blood vessels.

Medicine

Channels:

Childhood Obesity, Antibiotic, Microbiome, Gut Bacteria, PCORnet, PCORI, Patient Centered Outcomes Research, Community Engagement, Pediatric, Obesity

Swelling Obesity Rates May Be Tied to Childhood Antibiotic Use

Fat-feet-over-scale-300x244.jpg

As the nation’s obesity rate continues to skyrocket, scientists across the country are combing the health records of 1.6 million kids to determine if childhood antibiotic use causes weight gain later in life.

Medicine

Channels:

Opioid, Pain Medication

Scientists Report on Safe, Non-Addictive Opioid Analgesic in Animal Model

Since the isolation of morphine from opium in the 19th century, scientists have hoped to find a potent opioid analgesic that isn’t addictive and doesn’t cause respiratory arrest with increased doses.

Medicine

Channels:

hamid gari, scott lucia, james lambert, jim lambert, University Of Colorado Cancer Center, Breast Cancer, triple negative breast cancer, Immunotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, Immune Therapies

Study Uncovers Molecular Switch That May Sensitize Triple-Negative Breast Cancers to Immunotherapy

PRL3.Infographic.png

University of Colorado Cancer Center investigators unpack the mechanism of investigational drug, AMPI-109, showing its inactivation of PRL-3 flips an important switch on triple-negative breast cancer.

Science

Channels:

Kansas State University, K-State, KSU, Physics, James R. Macdonald Lab, Department Of Energy, DOE, Itzik Ben-Itzhak, AMO physics, Atomic, Molecular, Optical

J.R. Macdonald Lab Receives Nearly $8 Million DOE Grant Renewal

macdonald.jpg

Kansas State University's James R. Macdonald Laboratory has received a nearly $8 million grant renewal from the U.S. Department of Energy.

Medicine

Channels:

Hongjun Song, Guo-li Ming, Hengli Tang, zika, Drugs, cell, Infection, Virus

New Hope for Zika Treatment Found in Large-Scale Screen of Existing Drugs

Zikadrug.jpg

Scientists report that a specialized drug screen test using lab-grown human cells has revealed two classes of compounds already in the pharmaceutical arsenal that may work against mosquito-borne Zika virus infections.

Medicine

Channels:

Cholera, blood type

Study May Explain Why People with Type O Blood More Likely to Die of Cholera

USMC-13197.jpg

People with blood type O get sicker from cholera than people of other blood types. Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that cholera toxin activates a key molecule more strongly in people with blood type O than type A, possibly worsening symptoms.

Medicine

Channels:

Ophthalmology, Glaucoma, Contact Lens, drug delivery platform

Drug-Dispensing Contact Lens Effectively Lowers Eye Pressure in Pre-Clinical Glaucoma Model

JospehCiolinoMDwithcontactlens-CreditJohnEarlePhotography.jpg

A contact lens designed to deliver medication gradually to the eye could improve outcomes for patients with conditions requiring treatment with eye drops, which are often imprecise and difficult to self-administer. In a study published online today in Ophthalmology, a team of researchers have shown that a novel contact lens-based system, which uses a strategically placed drug polymer film to deliver medication gradually to the eye, is at least as effective, and possibly more so, as daily latanoprost eye drops in a pre-clinical model for glaucoma.

Medicine

Channels:

Cell Signaling, Retina, Vision, Pharmacology, Blindness, Macular Degeneration

Case Western Reserve University Researchers Identify New Drug Cocktail to Protect Mouse Retinas, Potentially Avoiding Blindness

Palczewski_2.jpg

A gentle combination of FDA-approved drugs could protect critical cells in the eye, called photoreceptor cells, against damage caused by bright light.

Medicine

Channels:

Colorectal Cancer, Colon Cancer, Rectal Cancer, colorectal cancer research, Immune activation

Researcher to Study a Two-Pronged Approach Against Colorectal Cancers

Ellen Beswick, PhD, studies G-CSF, a protein that could be key in attacking cancers of the colon and rectum, and possibly other cancers, too. Beswick was recently awarded a $1.7 M grant to study how G-CSF reduces tumor growth and draws macrophages, T-cells and natural killer cells to the tumor.

Medicine

Channels:

Autism, Cell Signaling, Development

Case Western Reserve University Scientists Uncover Common Cell Signaling Pathway Awry in Some Types of Autism

Controlvs.ASDNPCsBRN2.png

The researchers discovered that cells derived from autistic donors grew faster than those from control subjects and activated their genes in distinct patterns.

Medicine

Channels:

Research Suggests That a Novel Inhibitory Brain Receptor Is a Mechanism for Remission of Epilepsy in Adolescence

Research led by SUNY Downstate Medical Center shows that, at the onset of puberty, the emergence of a novel inhibitory brain receptor, α4βδ (alpha four beta delta), reduces seizure-like activity in a mouse model of epilepsy.

Medicine

Channels:

Colorectal Cancer, Colorectal Cancer Screening, Hmong, lay health educator, Sacramento, Cancer Health Disparities, NCI, Aancart

Lay Educators Help Boost Colorectal Screening Rates in Hmong

Tong-Elisa_29_1.jpg

Hmong Americans are more likely to understand the importance of colorectal cancer screening and to get screened when they’re provided information by specially trained Hmong lay health educators, new research from UC Davis has found.







Chat now!